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Remembrancer

Project Space installation by Danny Giles

Feb 10 – Apr 02, 2017
Opening Reception Feb 10 6-10pm
During his January 2017 artist residency at Sector 2337, Danny Giles will incubate new works that explore everyday things whose implications for identity and political resistance are activated through spectacles of memory and provide allegories for transgression and self-determination. Thereafter, Giles will present new works in Sector 2337’s project in a solo exhibition titled “Remembrancer.”
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“Remembrancer,” Installation image, Sector 2337, Chicago, 2017. Photo by Clare Britt.

 

“Remembrancer,” Installation image, Sector 2337, Chicago, 2017. Photo by Clare Britt.

“Remembrancer,” Installation image, Sector 2337, Chicago, 2017. Photo by Clare Britt.

 

“Remembrancer,” Installation image, Sector 2337, Chicago, 2017. Photo by Clare Britt.

“Remembrancer,” Installation image, Sector 2337, Chicago, 2017. Photo by Clare Britt.

 

“Remembrancer,” Installation image, Sector 2337, Chicago, 2017. Photo by Clare Britt.

“Remembrancer,” Installation image, Sector 2337, Chicago, 2017. Photo by Clare Britt.

 

Danny Giles, “An Extravagance of Laughter” 2017. Wood barrels, pexiglass variable size.

Danny Giles, “An Extravagance of Laughter” 2017. Wood barrels, pexiglass variable size.

 

Danny Giles, “An Extravagance of Laughter” 2017. Wood barrels, pexiglass variable size.

Danny Giles, “An Extravagance of Laughter” 2017. Wood barrels, pexiglass variable size.

 

Danny Giles, “An Extravagance of Laughter” 2017. Wood barrels, 6 min video and single track audio, variable size.

Danny Giles, “An Extravagance of Laughter” 2017. Wood barrels, 6 min video and single track audio, variable size.

 

Danny Giles, “Untitled No.3” 2017. Plaster, charcoal, 9”x 5” x 3.35”.

Danny Giles, “Untitled No.3” 2017. Plaster, charcoal, 9”x 5” x 3.35”.

 

Danny Giles, “Untitled No.4” 2017. Plaster, grout, 8”x 4” x 3.5”.

Danny Giles, “Untitled No.4” 2017. Plaster, grout, 8”x 4” x 3.5”.

 

Danny Giles, “Untitled No.1” 2017. Plaster, grout, charcoal, vaseline, wood, 10”x 17” x 7.5”.

Danny Giles, “Untitled No.1” 2017. Plaster, grout, charcoal, vaseline, wood, 10”x 17” x 7.5”.

 

Danny Giles, “Untitled No.2” 2017. Plaster, grout, charcoal, 10”x 17” x 7.5”.

Danny Giles, “Untitled No.2” 2017. Plaster, grout, charcoal, 10”x 17” x 7.5”.

 

Danny Giles combines a range of mediums and tactics to give form to political and metaphysical positions. His practice attempts to represent performative states of dispossession and to redress oppressive and exploitative systems. Giles received his BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 2011 and his MFA from Northwestern University in 2013.Giles attended the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in 2013 and has held residencies at Mana Contemporary, High Concept Laboratories and Illinois State University. Recent exhibitions and performances include MCA Live at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, 2017, LYRIC at Andrew Rafacz Gallery, 2016, Chicago and Vicinity at Shane Campbell Gallery, 2016.

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GRAFT

Solo Show by Edra Soto

Feb 10 – Apr 02, 2017
with an opening reception on Fri, Feb 10 @ 6-9pm
Main Gallery / Sector 2337 / 2337 N Milwaukee Ave., / Chicago

The Green Lantern Press is pleased to announce its Winter 2017 exhibition, GRAFT — an interactive exhibition for which the artist Edra Soto installs life-size Puerto Rican style bus stop benches inside of the Sector 2337 gallery, with the island’s traditional rejas on the exterior storefront. About the project, Curator Albert Stabler writes, “Even more than colonial and modern styles, vernacular architecture shows the full breadth of [Puerto Rico’s] historical influences, from before, during, and after colonialism. Appropriating the mesmerizing designs of rejas and transposing them on to structures in the mainland U.S. provokes questions. Can a nation that has so freely appropriated the land and resources of Puerto Rico, while consigning its residents to second-class citizenship and exorbitant government debt, be itself appropriated as a screen upon which Soto can project the (wooden) rejas of her Boricua childhood? Or does the gesture become a multiculturalist token of assimilation, an exotic garnish that helps to erase the trauma of conquest, exploitation, and slavery?” The first iteration of this exhibition took place at Cuchifritos Gallery in New York (Spring, 2016). It is accompanied by a two-part tabloid-style with bilingual contributions from Dorothy Bell Ferrer, Cristina Correa, Christopher Cozier, Rafael Franco, Alison Fraunhar, Jefferson Godard, Daniel Hojnacki, J. Anna Looney, Anansi kNOwBody, Jesus Mejia, Daniel R. Quiles, Xuxa Rodriguez, Teresa Silva, Albert Stabler, Andy Sullivan, and Carolyn Supinka.

GRAFT is produced with support from the Efroymson Family Fund and The Green Lantern Press.

Edra Soto, GRAFT, 2017. Installation view, Sector 2337. Photo by Clare Britt.

Edra Soto, GRAFT, 2017. Installation view, Sector 2337. Photo by Clare Britt.

 

Edra Soto, GRAFT, 2017. Installation view, Sector 2337. Photo by Clare Britt.

Edra Soto, GRAFT, 2017. Installation view, Sector 2337. Photo by Clare Britt.

 

Edra Soto, GRAFT, 2017. Installation view, Sector 2337. Photo by Clare Britt.

Edra Soto, GRAFT, 2017. Installation view, Sector 2337. Photo by Clare Britt.

 

Edra Soto, GRAFT, 2017. Installation view, Sector 2337. Photo by Clare Britt.

Edra Soto, GRAFT, 2017. Installation view, Sector 2337. Photo by Clare Britt.

 

Edra Soto, GRAFT, 2017. Installation view, Sector 2337. Photo by Clare Britt.

Edra Soto, GRAFT, 2017. Installation view, Sector 2337. Photo by Clare Britt.

 

Edra Soto, GRAFT, 2017. Installation view, Sector 2337. Photo by Clare Britt.

Edra Soto, GRAFT, 2017. Installation view, Sector 2337. Photo by Clare Britt.

 

Artist Bio: Edra Soto (b. Puerto Rico, 1971)  is a Chicago-based artist, educator, curator, and and co-director of the artist-run outdoor project space THE FRANKLIN. She obtained her Master of Fine Arts degree at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 2000, as well as attending Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, Beta-Local in Puerto Rico, and the Robert Rauschenberg Residency Program in Captiva, Florida though a 3Arts Foundation Fellowship. The 4th Poly/Graphic Triennial of San Juan and the Caribbean, Cuchifritos Gallery + Project Space in New York and the co-curation of the exhibition Present Standard, at the Chicago Cultural Center with overwhelmingly positive reviews from the Chicago Tribune, Newcity and Artforum. She was recently featured in Newcity’s annual Art 50 issue, Chicago’s Artists’ Artists and awarded the Efroymson Contemporary Arts Fellowship. Upcoming venues presenting Soto’s work include: The Arts Club of Chicago; The University Galleries at Illinois State University; Museo de la Universidad de Puerto Rico; the DePaul Museum; the Pérez Art Museum Miami, The Museum of Contemporary Art of Chicago; residencies at Project Row Houses in Houston, the Kohler Art Center in Wisconsin, the Robert Rauschenberg Residency in Captiva, Headlands Center for the Arts and a long awaited commission in collaboration with Dan Sullivan from the Chicago Transit Authority, featured her architectural intervention titled GRAFT at the Western Avenue stop on the train line to O’Hare Airport. Soto will be attending the Robert Rauschenberg Residency through their alumni fellowship program during the fall of 2017. Her work has been exhibited both nationally and internationally. edrasoto.com

Curator Bio: Albert Stabler spent 17 years in Chicago, devoting time to teaching art with young people, writing art criticism, and curating shows and events at independent galleries.  He is currently pursuing a Ph.D in Art Education at the University of Illinois. EfroymsonFF

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New Demands?

Project Space Installation by Lisa Vinebaum

The Green Lantern Press is pleased to present New Demands?, an exhibition by Lisa Vinebaum in and around Sector 2337’s project space. New Demands? presents new neon works and a site-specific, cut-vinyl window installation exploring intersections between historical and contemporary modes of collective organizing for better living and working conditions. Emphasizing text, typography and the juxtaposition of past and present protest slogans, Vinebaum’s extends back and forth across time, connecting current and historical demands for social, racial, and economic, justice. Drawing inspiration from suffrage, civil rights, and labor slogans, New Demands? stresses notions of union, collective, belonging, and mutual support — modes of togetherness that extend across struggles for labor justice and human and civil rights. At once angry and hopeful, the show emphasizes collectivity and community, mutual support and solidarity at a time of increased polarization, intolerance, xenophobia, and exclusion. This exhibition is part of an ongoing series of the artist’s work exploring labor, collectivity, and precarity, created under the same title and incorporating public performances, interventions, cloth banners, print works, text based installations, and neon.

 

Artist Bio: Lisa Vinebaum is an interdisciplinary artist, critical writer, and educator. Working across art and theory, her practice explores collectivity and intersubjective relationships, working conditions and workers’ rights, and the value of artistic labor. Her art practice incorporates performance, text-based installations, textiles, print, neon, video, photography and protest tactics. Her work has been included in exhibitions and festivals internationally, including David Weinberg Photography, Rapid Pulse International Performance Art Festival, Performance Studies International 19, Open Engagement: Art & Social Practice, La Centrale, the Centre Pompidou, the UCLA Hammer Museum, Lincoln Center, and in conjunction with Grace Exhibition and Performance Space and Articule Gallery. Her scholarly work has been commissioned and published in edited anthologies, academic journals and exhibition catalogues, including Exhibiting Craft and Design: Transgressing the White Cube Paradigm 1930-present (Routledge 2017), Danica Maier: Grafting Propriety from Stitch to Drawn Line (Black Dog Books 2017), More Caught in the Act: Performance by Canadian Women (YYZ Books 2016), The Handbook of Textile Culture (Bloomsbury Academic 2015), the Journal of Modern Craft online, and Textile: Cloth and Culture. Lisa Vinebaum holds a PhD in Art from Goldsmiths, University of London. She is an Assistant Professor of Fiber and Material Studies, and affiliated faculty in Art History, Theory and Criticism at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. www.lisavinebaum.com

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This Land Again

Solo Show by Lindsey Dorr-Niro

Was a high wall there that tried to stop me
A sign was painted said: Private Property,
But on the back side it didn’t say nothing—
This land was made for you and me.
-Woody Guthrie, This Land is Your Land (1944)

The Green Lantern Press is pleased to present Lindsey Dorr-Niro’s spring 2017 exhibition, This Land Again, in the main gallery of Sector 2337. With the backside of a billboard as her starting point, Dorr-Niro interrogates the global epidemic of distracted materialism through a set of architectural interventions. These include a floor sculpture/stage in the gallery’s center that shifts its configuration according to the needs of public programs; a site-specific screen that amplifies and undermines Sector’s storefront window; the gallery’s adjacent hallway is additionally transformed into a construction site. The resulting environment seeks to prompt inquiry and agency among viewers and participants alike, asking: What does it mean to take ownership of our experience within America’s 21st-century landscape of late-capitalism? What and where is “freedom”? If freedom is possible, how does it locate human dignity and citizenship on this land? The billboard photograph was taken in Chicago but initially displayed in downtown Bloomington, Indiana, for an experimental performance. Returning to its original site/sight, the image becomes an adaptable backdrop for programs and interventions that complicate linear notions of truth and authenticity within today’s sociopolitical environment.

Artist Bio: Throughout her work, transdisciplinary visual artist Lindsey Dorr Niro aims to make art a practice of critical consciousness, calling viewers deeper into themselves and relation with the world. Her installations disrupt and reorganize our vision and being in a way that enable us to see, imagine, and be differently — facilitating an embodied, contemplative, and ecstatic alternative to the amnesiac conditions of late capitalism. Lindsey holds her MFA from Yale University (2008) and currently works as both an artist and educator in Chicago, Illinois. Recent exhibitions include A Primacy of Perception at Indiana University’s Fuller Projects Gallery (Bloomington, IN 2016) and An Anthem for the Sun as part of Roman Susan’s No Diving! Series (Chicago, IL, 2016).