Poets Theater Reading Room

Curated by Patrick Durgin

Dec 07 – Dec 10 2016

In tandem with the Second Annual Festival of Poets Theater, Sector 2337 is proud to present a reading room in the project space featuring books, programs, audio and visual recordings connected to Poets Theater–featuring Signals Through the Flames: The Story of the Living Theatre (1984) by Sheldon Rochlin and Maxine Harris.

The Second Annual Festival of Poets Theater presents performances, screenings and readings over four nights, plus an afternoon of talks on the genre at Sector 2337 and Links Hall. Tickets and Passes are available at www.linkshall.org

Thanks to Canarium Books, kenning editions, Flood Editions, The Living Theater.

New Age Now : Art Auction

2016 GLP Fundraiser

Featuring Claire Ashley, Rebecca Beachy, Rami George, Sofia Leiby, Heather Mekkelson, Michael Milano, Aay Preston-Myint, Mitsu Salmon, Edra Soto, Hui-min Tsen, Andrew Yang, and Philip von Zweck.

Toying with the intersection of 18th c. Spiritualism and 60s psychedelia, NEW AGE NOW: Art Auction features the works of twelve artists and artworks that use beeswax, photography, spray paint, silkscreen, a salad bowl, mud, terrycloth towel, plastic, indigo dye, duct tape, and birdsnest. Within this alchemical field of materials, we look for the future ad hoc: How can artistic experimentation articulate strategies for collective and long term sustainability?

This auction/exhibition is further contextualized by a Transcendental Menu with finger foods specifically prepared for the occasion by artists Brandon Alvendia, Jessica Campbell, Rebecca Mir Grady, Kiam Marcelo Junio, Alyssa Martinez, Eric May, Midnight Kitchen Projects, Kathleen Rooney, and Edra Soto.

Buy tickets to this event here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How this works: Interested parties are welcome to bid online until Dec 2nd at 12am; bidding will resume at 6pm that same day during a silent auction at Sector 2337, at which time the last online bid will be entered as the first silent auction bid. The silent auction will take place from 6-9:45pm on Friday Dec 2nd, 2016; winners will be announced on site at 10pm + confirmed via email by Dec 3 at 12am. Thank you for your support!

10% of all proceeds earned from individual artworks are paid back to contributing artists.

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Institutional Garbage

Presented by The Green Lantern Press + The Hyde Park Art Center

this online exhibition is published here  (use command +/- keys to assist with zooming and and out)

Sep 01 – Dec 31, 2016

and launches officially on Sep 01, 7-9pm  at Sector 2337, 2337 N Milwaukee Ave., Chicago IL during Wasted hours – an evening of performance (curated by Every house has a door) with commissioned works by Michal Samama and Alberto Aguilar 
Participating artists include: Alberto Aguilar, Brit Barton, Mara Baker, Kevin Blake, Zippora Elders, Rami George, David Hall, Kuras and MacKenzie,  Josh Rios and Anthony Romero,  Michal Samana, Naqeeb Stevens, Tina Tahir, Anna Martine Whitehead; writers: Lise Haller Baggesen, Daniel Borzutzky, Isaiah Dufort, Patrick Durgin, Tricia Van Eck, Jane Lewty, Jill Magi, Nam Chi Nguyễn, Rowland Saifi, Suzanne Scanlon, Mia You and Maarten van der Graaf with Fiep van Bodegom and Obe Alkema; & curators: David Ayala-Alfonso, Britton Bertran, Rashayla Marie Brown, Every house has a door, Lucia Fabio, João Florêncio, Stevie Greco, Jeanine Hofland, Renan Laru-an, La Keisha Leek, Sofia Lemos and Vincent van Velsen. Online Exhibition Design: Pouya Ahmadi.

Institutional Garbage is an online exhibition that presents the administrative residue of imaginary public institutions produced by artists, writers, and curators. This residue includes but is not limited to contracts, email correspondences, documented unproductivity, syllabi, scanned objects, and obstacle courses; collecting such fragments in one place, Institutional Garbage illustrates the backend activities of imaginary bureaucracies in an effort to trace the private life of institutional endeavors. What comes to the fore is not a cohesive, singular agenda, but instead a cross-section of often misfired objects that, once assembled, try to tease out new strategies for community arts production, education, sustainability, and value assessment. The resulting website will launch on September 1st, 2016 on the occasion of Wasted Hours, a live performance event at Sector 2337 curated by Every house has a door. Institutional Garbage is curated by Caroline Picard and Lara Schoorl with support from The Center Program, in response to a 2014 invitation RISD students posed on the occasion of the Hyde Park Art Center’s 75th anniversary. 

Photo: Mara Baker, pisa falling, 2016. Still from stop-motion animation

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Styles of Radical Will (Italian Sculpture)

Solo Exhibition by Stephen Lapthisophon

Sep 09 – Nov 20, 2016
with an opening reception on Fri Sep 09 @ 6-9pm
at Sector 2337 (Main Gallery), 2337, N Milwaukee Ave., Chicago, IL

The Green Lantern Press is pleased to present its fall exhibition, Styles of Radical Will (Italian Sculpture), by Stephen Lapthisophon, on view in the main gallery from Sept 09-Nov 20, 2016. Styles of Radical Will (Italian Sculpture) mixes sculpture, wall drawing, found objects, text, photography, works on paper, and fabric to address issues of time and duration. Works prepared in both the artist’s studio and created onsite in the gallery space make reference to artistic precedents in Italian art from the mid 20th c. such as Piero Manzoni, Jannis Kounellis, Giovanni Anselmo and Giuseppe Penone. This show extends Toccare (Non) Toccare, a body of work Lapthisophon presented for a 2016 project at the Nasher Sculpture Center­. Texts will be drawn from an artist book produced in conjunction with the Nasher project, Notebook 1967-68, incorporating the work of Italian poet Giacomo Leopardi. The way the show brings together installation, sculpture, and writing congeals in Lapthisophon’s simple correspondence about his materials, unified suddenly in a list without commas:

Paper flowers ink vegetables fabric lumber cardboard leaves egg shells string
Books dead flowers light nails glass and a flag

“Lapthisophon’s work evokes the past, and in general a sense of pastness, to poetically address the present.” — Artforum, print edition, May 2016.

Stephen Lapthisophon is an American artist and educator working in the field of conceptual art, critical theory, and disability studies. Lapthisophon received his MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 1979. His early work combined poetry, performance, sound art, and visual arts with postmodern philosophical concerns. He was also influenced by the legacy of the Situationists, who sought to make everyday life a focus of artistic activity. Lapthisophon has taught at Columbia College in Chicago, the School of the Art Institute, and the University of Texas at Dallas. He currently teaches art and art history at The University of Texas at Arlington.

Installation Images

Stephen Lapthisophon, "Styles of Radical Will (Italian Sculpture)," 2016. Installation image,  Sector 2337, Chicago. Photo by Clare Britt.

Stephen Lapthisophon, “Styles of Radical Will (Italian Sculpture),” 2016. Installation image, Sector 2337, Chicago. Photo by Clare Britt.

 

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Stephen Lapthisophon, “Styles of Radical Will (Italian Sculpture),” 2016. Installation image, Sector 2337, Chicago. Photo by Clare Britt.

 

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Stephen Lapthisophon, “Styles of Radical Will (Italian Sculpture),” 2016. Installation image, Sector 2337, Chicago. Photo by Clare Britt.

 

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Stephen Lapthisophon, “Styles of Radical Will (Italian Sculpture),” 2016. Installation image, Sector 2337, Chicago. Photo by Clare Britt.

 

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Stephen Lapthisophon, “Bare Life (GA),” 2016. Cardboard, eggshell, housepaint, rain, 18” x 12” x 12” (h). Photo by Clare Britt.

 

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Stephen Lapthisophon, “Eggbell” (detail), 2016. Rope, string, nail, eggshell, gold, dry pigment, book. Dimensions variable. Photo by Clare Britt.

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Stephen Lapthisophon, “Styles of Radical Will (Italian Sculpture),” 2016. Installation image, Sector 2337, Chicago. Photo by Clare Britt.

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A Rule By Nobody

Curated by Third Object for the Sector Project Space

Sept 09 – Nov 20, 2016
with an opening reception for Part I. on Fri, Sep 09 @ 7-9pm and for Part II. on Sat, Oct, 22 @ 7-9pm
at Sector 2337 (Project Space), 2337 N Milwaukee Ave., Chicago IL

The Green Lantern Press is pleased to announce its Fall 2016 Curatorial Residency was awarded to Third Object, for the group exhibition, A Rule By Nobody 

A Rule By Nobody is an exploration of the boredoms, frustrations and pleasures of bureaucratic routines. Drawing its title from Hannah Arendt’s definition of bureaucracy, the exhibition takes the bored energy of office labor and channels it into a multipart dive into the sublimely overflowing inbox, the inky warm Xerox room, the balled up wads of red tape, and the moments of escape that punctuate the droning beige sameness of nine to five.

The show is composed of a two-part group exhibition in Sector 2337’s rear project space, a video screening, a live performance, and a printed publication.

Exhibiting artists include: (Part One) Naama Arad, Samuel Levi Jones, Hai Knafo, Andrew Norman Wilson / (Part Two) Stephen Kwok, Kelly Lloyd, Christopher Meerdo / (Ongoing) Globe Al Chemical Company

Additionally, video screening artists include Simon Denny, Liz Magic Laser, Hanne Lippard, Jodie Mack, Ellen Nielsen, Kay Rosen, Pilvi Takala, Lawrence Weiner, and Andrew Norman Wilson. Publication includes contributions from Brandon Alvendia, Blair Bogin, Rashayla Marie Brown, Alex Chitty, Bethany Collins, Nick Ferreira, Jesse Malmed, Huong Ngo, Josh Rios, Anthony Romero, Neal Vandenbergh, J. Gibran Villalobos, and Philip von Zweck.

A Rule by Nobody is organized by Third Object, a roving curatorial collective based in Chicago. Recent exhibitions include Slow Stretch, Mana Contemporary Chicago; Satellites, The Franklin; Were the Eye Not Sunlike, ACRETV and Fernwey; and Mossy Cloak, Roots and Culture. Third Object is Ann Meisinger, Raven Munsell, and Gan Uyeda.

Image: Stephen Kwok, 1117 (installation view), 2013

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PART ONE Installation images

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Globe Al Chemical Company, “Satellite Office,” Email ooo@globe-al.org for more info about the office. Installation image, “A Rule by Nobody,” Sector 2337, Chicago, 2016. Photo by Clare Britt.

 

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“A Rule by Nobody,” Installation image, Sector 2337, Chicago, 2016. Photo by Clare Britt.

 

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“A Rule by Nobody,” Installation image, Sector 2337, Chicago, 2016. Photo by Clare Britt.

 

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Hai Knafo, “Portraits for The WallStreet Journal, 1982 – 2011,” rapidograph pens on paper, variable size. Photo by Clare Britt.

 

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“A Rule by Nobody,” Installation image, Sector 2337, Chicago, 2016. Photo by Clare Britt.

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Copy Drawings

Solo Exhibition by Magalie Guérin

Opening reception on Fri Mar 25 from 6-9pm w/ a special performance by Marissa Perel at 7pm

Exhibition runs from March 25, 2016 – May 15, 2016

The Green Lantern Press is pleased to announce the solo exhibition of Magalie Guérin, Copy Drawings, organized in conjunction with the publication of Guérin’s first book, NOTES ON (The Green Lantern Press, 2016). With 100+ drawn reproductions of the artist’s prior works, Copy Drawings, examines the process by which one reconsiders and recreates the past, posing questions about what is and is not original.

For the opening and book launch of Guérin’s NOTES ON, NY-based performance artist, Marissa Perel, will perform, “Oh toi, ma persécutée!!” my mother used to say to me. The title of the piece, taken directly from NOTES ON, points to the painful suspension of disbelief an artist experiences when facing “the blank surface—the emptiness” that it “can/will actually become something” (Guérin 19). Reading various excerpts of Guérin’s book, Perel will insert her own commentary into the margins, while sampling music and other media referenced in the book (as in, if you like Patti Smith, you should definitely come to see this).

NOTES ON is an a-chronological studio diary that Guérin has re-transcribed twice by hand and now in print. Through that active facsimile Guérin documents her painting process, mapping at once her creative history and the way that history consistently transforms. Personal, professional, and creative spheres intersect like simultaneous layers in a painting as accumulated entries capture the shifting gray area between self-doubt, self-awareness, and creative breakthrough. A recurring and parallel “character” in this journal is a hat shape—an abstract form that Guérin paints over and over again. Whether anatomical or abstract, the hat shape becomes an anthropomorphic companion as witness/lover/nemesis to Guérin’s artistic endeavors. Guérin shows us not only that a room of one’s own is useful, but what can happen when it is utilized.

Magalie Guérin is a Montreal-born artist based in Chicago, IL. She received a MFA at The School of The Art Institute of Chicago in 2011. Solo exhibitions include Sector 2337 (Chicago), Lyles & King (New York), The Suburban (Oak Park) and Corbett vs. Dempsey (Chicago), which was a Critics’ Picks in Artforum.com. Recent group exhibitions at Nicelle Beauchene (NY), Brand New gallery (Milan), and Rhona Hoffman (Chicago). Guérin is the author of NOTES ON, published by The Green Lantern Press (2016). She teaches Painting & Drawing at College of DuPage, Indiana University Northwest, and at The School of The Art Institute of Chicago. She is represented by Corbett vs. Dempsey.

Marissa Perel is an artist and writer based in New York. Her interdisciplinary work includes performance, installation, criticism and curatorial projects. Perel attended the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (M.F.A 2010) with the artist, Magalie Guerin, though their friendship began after graduating. Through shared values of writing and criticism, and conversations on the parallels of formal structures in choreography and painting, they became supporters of one another’s aesthetic interrogations. In Chicago, Perel’s work has been shown at the Chicago Cultural Center, Links Hall, the Chicago Humanities Festival, Defibrillator, and LVL3 galleries among others. In New York, her work has been shown through Movement Research at Judson Church, The Chocolate Factory Theater, Danspace Project, Dixon Place, and the former Golden gallery. She is currently in residence at Brooklyn Arts Exchange and the Elizabeth Foundation for the Arts. She is a lecturer through the Low-Residency M.F.A Program at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

 

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Bleeding Black Noise

Group exhibition curated by Amelia Ishmael in the Sector Project Space

February 12-March 11, 2016

Friday Feb 12 from 6-9 pm: Opening Reception and publication release for EN3MY, 1550 N. Milwaukee Ave., third floor , 2012-2005, a chapbook edited by Amelia Ishmael and Jason Soliday (Holon Press, 2016)


With a live performance on Fri, Feb 26 @ 7pm with Noise Crush + The Fortieth Day 

and a closing screening on Fri, March  11 @ 7pm (details below)

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Featuring Gast Bouschet & Nadine Hilbert (Brussels, Belgium), Faith Coloccia (Seattle, US), Niels Geybels (Antwerpen, Belgium), Alessandro Keegan (New York City), Max Kuiper (Arnhem, Netherlands), and Michaël Sellam (Paris, France)

Bleeding Black Noise is a revision of Steven Parrino’s statement “My relation between Rock and visual art: I will bleed for you.” Here the curator replaces Rock with Noise, and celebrates the Bleeding as a release of the Black Noise, raw energy and formless potential. The collected works on paper of seven artists provide encounters with dust, electromagnetism, sympathetic magic, ecology, politics, and a passion for storms. Each of the artists are involved in experimental music—as active musicians or collaborators.

This exhibition is coordinated to appear near large bodies of water. In Chicago it will take place during the season when the melted ice and city-street sludge mix in ecstatic swirls of primordial fluids, and when the snow causes audiovisual sensations to move to the forefront and include the perceiver within the elements themselves.

Amelia Ishmael is a curator and writer, specializing in visual art’s relations with experimental music. She curates video and film screenings and gallery exhibitions for venues across North America, Europe, and in print—including “.blacK~SSStaTic_darK~fuZZZ_dOOm~glitCH.” (2013) and “Black Thorns in the Black Box” (2012), the journal portfolios for Helvete: a journal of Black Metal Theory (2013-2016), and the internationally recognized exhibitions “Black Thorns in the White Cube” (Western Exhibitions, 2012) and Charlemagne Palestine’s solo installation “divinitusssanimalusssacréusssorganusss” (Experimental Sound Studio, 2014).

 

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Bleeding Black Noise, Installation view, Sector 2337, Chicago, 2016. Photo by Clare Britt.

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Bleeding Black Noise, Installation view, Sector 2337, Chicago, 2016. Photo by Clare Britt.

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Bleeding Black Noise, Installation view, Sector 2337, Chicago, 2016. Photo by Clare Britt.

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Bleeding Black Noise, Installation view, Sector 2337, Chicago, 2016. Photo by Clare Britt.

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The Sea is Represented by an Irregular Shape

An Opera by Mark Booth

Feb 06 – Mar 13, 2016

with an opening reception on Sat, Mar 06 from 6-9pm

Sector 2337 is happy to present Mark Booth’s evolving project The Sea is Represented by an Irregular Shape as an on-going month long production with focused occurrences of the work happening every Saturday in February at 2:30. The basis of Booth’s opera is an unfolding chain of metaphors that slowly describe a world of surprising, yet effortlessly entangled images. The intuitive resonance of each juxtaposition—how the sea could be represented by space, and space represented by carbonated water—manifests throughout the month-long performance as sound, written text, and paintings. These multivalent metaphors strike the audience as a tangent strikes a parabola; as the constantly changing performers read their way through the metaphors the supreme stillness of Booth’s formal decisions highlight the work’s strangely conscious inward movement. Cosmic in scope and stoic in its ethics, The Sea is Represented by an Irregular Shape is an opera for our ecological age.

This performative installation is produced by The Green Lantern Press as part of IN>TIME 2016, a Winter Long, City Wide, Multi Venue Performance Festival for Chicago (January 29th – March 4th).

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Performances will occur on:

February 13th at 2:30
February 20th at 2:30
February 27th at 2:30
March 5th at 2:30
March 12th at 2:30

Mark Booth is an interdisciplinary artist, sound artist, writer, and musician. His work in text, image, and sound explores the material qualities of language, as well as the ways that language functions (and does not function) to describe human experience. Having learned to read and navigate the world as a dyslexic, Booth uses his work to make sense of his own disjointed experience with words and meaning. His art is simultaneously grandiose in scope (attempting (and failing, of course) to describe the entire spectrum of human existence) and comically quotidian. Booth is on the faculty of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. He has exhibited and performed his work in Chicago, nationally, and internationally in a variety of known and obscure venues.

The 4th edition of IN>TIME Festival is a convergence of performance practices in Chicago. IN>TIME collaborates with 18 venues that range from museum to gallery to DIY spaces. It is borne from deep engagement: engagement with local performance practices, with friends and artists internationally, with structures and concepts of performance itself. It has evolved from a biennial to a triennial festival, encompassing venues all over Chicago, and pieces ranging from dance to performance art to experimental theatre. It’s IN>TIME because it comes just in the dead of winter, when things seem bleakest; because it provides a snapshot of what is happening in contemporary performance right now; because performance is a time-based medium that required that we all be present with one another. IN>TIME is a coming together for a moment within performance.

Installation View:

 

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Mark Booth, “The Sea is Represented by an Irregular Shape,” 2016. Installation view, Sector 2337, Chicago, IL. Photo by Clare Britt.

 

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Mark Booth, “The Sea is Represented by an Irregular Shape,” 2016. Installation view, Sector 2337, Chicago, IL. Photo by Clare Britt.

 

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Mark Booth, “MIGRATORY SHAPES,” 2016. Steel and wood, 12 units. Installation view, Sector 2337, Chicago, IL. Photo by Clare Britt.

 

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Mark Booth, “MIGRATORY SHAPES,” (detail) 2016. Steel and wood, 12 units. Installation view, Sector 2337, Chicago, IL. Photo by Clare Britt.

 

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Mark Booth, “The Sea is Represented by an Irregular Shape,” 2016. Installation view, Sector 2337, Chicago, IL. Photo by Clare Britt.

 

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Mark Booth, “‘THIS representing ‘THAT’ ( 59 units) and IS (third person singular of ‘be’) (5 units),” (detail) 2016. Acrylic and ink on paper. Sector 2337, Chicago, IL. Photo by Clare Britt.

 

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Mark Booth, “POLYP,” 2016. Acrylic and ink on paper. Photo by Clare Britt.

 

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Imperceptibly and Slowly Opening

A Group Exhibition About Plants

Oct 09 – Nov 21, 2015

Opening Reception Oct 09 6-9pm

Featuring artists Sebastian Alvarez, Srijon Chowdhury, Katy Cowan, Zoe Crosher, Lindsey French, Essi Kausalainen, Deanna Ledezma, Wilfredo Prieto, Steve Ruiz, John Steck Jr., Linda Tegg, and Andrew Yang; a night of performances by Katherine Behar and Joshua Kent (curated by Every house has a door); and The Lichen Museum, an Institution in Residence, by A. Laurie Palmer.

Responding to a new field of critical thought, Imperceptibly and Slowly Opening uses the group exhibition format to explore the strangeness of plants and algae, and how they trouble human structures. Vegetal life forms are banal in their ubiquity. Undeniably alive, yet silent, they creep upwards, their roots submerged and out of human sight. Like anarchists protesting order, weeds break through concrete. Plants challenge theoretical logic as well; they can be both one and many: Aspen trees growing on a hillside share a single root system. Plants have occupations and desires: engaged in constant growth, they spread out with a will to consume and occupy space. Studies confirm that plants communicate and activate built-in chemical defense mechanisms to ward off predators. Some even move visibly: Mimosa plants close in on themselves when touched by a human finger. This would suggest some kind of sentience, but what would the character of that sentience be? How do we quantify it? Imperceptibly and Slowly Opening highlights the inaccessible subjectivity that plants possess. Proposed artists install multi-disciplinary artworks showing plant life as it troubles both physical and ideological human spaces. Capitalizing on the potential for multi-disciplinary programming, this exhibit includes Impatient Flowers — a performance series curated by Every house has a door, The Lichen Museum (Sector 2337’s first Institution-in-Residence), a three mile plant walk, and a series of talks. Its affiliated and forthcoming catalogue (The Green Lantern Press, 2016) contextualizes participating artists with auxiliary writing by Giovanni Aloi, Joela Jacobs, Renan Laru-an, Michael Marder, Catriona Sandilands, Steven Shaviro and others. Curated by Caroline Picard, this exhibition is part of an on-going investigation that began with Field Static (The Co-Prosperity Sphere, 2012), Ghost Nature (Gallery 400 / La Box ENSA, 2014), and congealed last fall in a group show about the material of the human body, The New [New] Corpse (Sector 2337, 2014). Following suite, Imperceptibly and Slowly Opening attempts to examine and celebrate the verdant strangers among us.

Image credit: Essi Kausalainen, Orchard, 2013. Still from video, 2″. Photo by Karin Pennanen and courtesy of artist.

Sebastian Alvarez is a transdisciplinary artist, independent researcher, and Visiting Faculty at the San Francisco Art Institute. Working across diverse media, his practice highlights the interrelation of disparate infrastructures and the uncanniness of human-made systems. Alvarez’s work manifests in the form of still and moving allegorical images, video, infographics, performative lectures, sonic compositions, and walks. He received a MFA (2011) in Performance Art from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and has performed, curated, and presented work internationally at such venues and institutions as Yerba Buena Center for the Arts (San Francisco), Museum of Contemporary Art (Chicago), Hyde Park Art Center, Chicago Cultural Center, Whitney Biennial (NYC), Postgarage (Graz, Austria), Townhouse Gallery (Cairo, Egypt), and the École Nationale Supérieure d’Art de Bourges (Bourges, France).

Srijon Chowdhury (b. 1987, Bangladesh) lives and works in Los Angeles, California and Portland, Oregon. Chowdhury received his MFA from Otis College of Art and Design in 2013. Solo exhibitions of his work have appeared in Los Angeles at Klowden Mann and at The Gallery in Dhaka, Bangladesh as well as in group shows at the Torrance Art Museum, California; Launch Gallery and Helen Bolsky Gallery in Los Angeles; Upfor in Portland, OR; and in Miami at Fredric Snitzer Gallery.

Katy Cowan (b. 1982 in Lake Geneva, WI) received her BFA at the University of Puget Sound (Tacoma, WA) and MFA at Otis College of Art and Design (Los Angeles, CA). Recent solo and two-person exhibitions include The Kittredge Gallery (University of Puget Sound, Tacoma, WA); Green Gallery South (Oak Park, IL); Dan Devening Projects + Editions (Chicago, IL); Green Gallery (Milwaukee, WI); Cherry and Martin (Los Angeles, CA); and ltd los angeles (Los Angeles, CA). Her work has also been included in group exhibitions at Cherry and Martin (Los Angeles, CA); The Poor Farm (Manawa, WI); The Torrance Art Museum (Torrance, CA) and Los Angeles Nomadic Division (Los Angeles, CA). Cowan lives and works in Milwaukee, WI.

Zoe Crosher is an artist who lives and works in Los Angeles. Inspired primarily by the collapse of the image and the imaginary, Crosher explores disconnects between the fantasy of something and its reality. She is the founder and president of the Los Angeles branch of The Fainting Club. Crosher has taught at UCLA and Art Center College of Design, and was Associate Editor of the journal Afterall after receiving her MFA from CalArts. In 2011 she was awarded the prestigious Art Here and Now Award by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and is a recent recipient of the Rauschenberg award. Her work has been included in MoMA’s 2012 “New Photography” exhibition as well as extensive exhibitions throughout the United States and internationally. Most recently, Crosher worked with the Los Angeles Nomadic Division (LAND) on “The Manifest Destiny Billboard Project,” a series she initiated of artist-produced billboards and activations that unfolded along the Interstate 10 Freeway from Florida to California through the spring of 2015.

Lindsey French is an artist and educator whose work engages in gestures of communication with landscapes and the nonhuman. Embracing a number of mediation strategies, her projects materialize as texts written in collaboration with trees, video performances of attempted dialogues with the landscape, and sound installations of distant and displaced forests. French has shared her work in places such as the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago, the Chicago Cultural Center, the Chicago Perch, the Pico House Gallery in Los Angeles, Flying Object in Hadley, MA and in conjunction with the International Symposium of Electronics Arts in both Albuquerque and Vancouver. Her work has been featured in an essay in Leonardo and discussed on podcasts for Creative Disturbance. French currently teaches courses that explore new media practices and site specific research at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in the Art and Technology Studies, Sculpture, and Contemporary Practices Departments.

Essi Kausalainen (b. 1979) has studied performance art and – theory in Turku Arts Academy and the Theatre Academy of Finland. Her work has been exhibited and performed in venues such as la Galerie (Noisy-le-Sec), kim? (Riga), Malmö Moderna Museet, Frankfurter Kunstverein, Museum for Contemporary Art Roskilde, Nikolaj Kunsthalle (Copenhagen) and Kunstraum Bethanien (Berlin).

Deanna Ledezma is a Ph.D. student in the Art History Department at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). Her research explores turn-of-the-century vernacular photography and the material culture of memory in the United States. Her projects have examined the material practices of photography in the home, hairwork and photographic jewelry, and the transformation of nineteenth-century relics in the work of contemporary artist Dario Robleto. She received her master’s degree in Art History from UIC and undergraduate degrees in Art and English from Texas State University. During her graduate studies, she has held the Abraham Lincoln Fellowship (2011–2012; 2013–2014) and the Diversifying Higher Education Faculty in Illinois (DFI) Fellowship (2014–2015).

Wilfredo Prieto‘s latest solo exhibitions were held at Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes de La Habana, Havana (2015), S.M.A.K., Gent (2014), Sala de Arte Publico Siqueiros, Mexico (2012), Hangar Bicocca, Milan (2012), Praxis, ARTIUM, Vitoria (2011), Centro de Arte 2 de Mayo (CA2M), Móstoles, Madrid (2011). Prieto’s work has been included in numerous group exhibitions, including the Centre George Pompidou, Paris (2014), Guggenheim Museum, New York (2014), Lentos Kunstmuseum Linz, Linz (2014), Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (2014), Stedelijk Museum Bureau, Amsterdam (2013), Collateral Event of the 55th Venice Bienal, Venice (2013), , 29th Sao Paolo Biennial, Sao Paolo (2010), De Appel Arts Centre, Amsterdam (2010), CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts, San Francisco (2009) and MoMA, New York (2008). Prieto received The Cartier Award (Frieze, London, 2008) and the 2000 UNESCO Prize for the Promotion of the Arts (7th Havana Biennial, DUPP, Havana, 2000).

Steve Ruiz is an artist and writer currently based in Cambridge, UK. He earned an MFA from the University of Chicago in 2013 and has recently exhibited work at Roots & Culture and Flat Space in Chicago and Bermuda Gallery, Milwaukee. In addition to his studio practice, Steve writes about contemporary art for Daily Serving and manages Chicago’s visual art calendar, The Visualist.

John Steck Jr. is an artist from Chicago who earned his BFA at the Massachusetts College of Art & Design & his MFA at the San Francisco Art Institute. He has exhibited across fourteen states and completed artist residencies in Iceland. Recent publications include Romka, Aint Bad Magazine, Incandescent & The Hand. He currently teaches at Waubonsee Community College.

Linda Tegg explores the contingent viewing conditions through which we orient ourselves in the world. Driven by curiosity, her work oscillates from the romantic to the forensic, in efforts to decipher abstract concepts through concrete models. The artist was the Samstag Scholar of 2014, The Georges Mora Foundation Fellow of 2012 and has been the recipient of numerous Australia Council for the Arts and Arts Victoria Grants. She has degrees from The University of Melbourne and RMIT University. Recent Solo exhibitions include; Grasslands, The State Library of Victoria, Melbourne, 2014; Choir, Westspace, Melbourne 2014; Coexistence, MARSO Galleria, Mexico City, 2012. Selected group exhibitions include; Don’t Talk to Strangers, Random Institute, Brooklyn, 2014 and NEW13, Australian Centre for Contemporary Art, Melbourne, 2013.

Andrew Yang is a transdisciplinary artist and scholar working across the interweaving of the natural, cultural, and bio-historical. His projects have been exhibited from Oklahoma to Yokohama, Chicago to Kassel, with new work for the 14th Istanbul Biennial in 2015. His writing & research appear in journals crossing biology, art, and philosophy including Biological Theory, Interdisciplinary Science Reviews, Antennae, Interdisciplinary Studies in the Philosophy of Science, and Leonardo. He holds a PhD in Zoology and MFA in Visual Arts; he is currently an Associate Professor at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. In the fall of 2015 he will be a visiting scholar at the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science (MPIWG) working on archival knowledge through the Anthropocene.

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The Lichen Museum (Institution in Residence)

by A. Laurie Palmer

A. Laurie Palmer

Oct 09 – Nov 21, 2015

Organized Lichen Walks will be available on October 10th at 10:00, 2:00, and 4:00.  Space is limited. RSVP to info@sector2337.com

During Sector 2337’s group exhibition, Imperceptibly and Slowly Opening (organized by The Green Lantern Press), A. Laurie Palmer will install her Lichen Museum in Sector 2337’s project space. The activities of the Lichen Museum include, among other things, a screening of lichen and lichenologists, guided lichen walks on October 10th, and a window installation.

The Lichen Museum draws inspiration from five radical qualities of the lichen organism (and parallel considerations for human becoming):

—two-ness
(our “I” is also a “we”)
—resistance to cultivation
(we can’t be reduced to use-value)
—site-specificity
(our bodies locate us)
—slowness
(we learn and grow by cultivating powers of attention)
—close association with the mineral world
(we are connected to the rock we devour)

With lichen as muse, the museum solicits and develops actions and perspectives that explore ideas about individuality, labor, relationships to place, and non-human temporalities, and it raises questions about
human dominance of the material world.

A. Laurie Palmer is an artist, writer, and teacher. Her work is concerned, most immediately, with resistance to privatization, and more generally, with theoretical and material explorations of matter’s active nature as it asserts itself on different scales and in different speeds. Her work takes various forms as sculpture, installation, public projects, and writing. Most recently, she has pursued an extended exploration of mineral extraction sites in the U.S. (In the Aura of a Hole published with Black Dog Publishing in Fall, 2014). Palmer collaborated with the four-person art collective Haha for twenty years, while based in Chicago. Palmer now teaches in the Art Department at the University of California, Santa Cruz.

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Tertiary Dimensions

Opening Reception on Sept 04, 5-8 pm

Tertiary Dimensions
September 4th-19th 2015
Curated by Alexandria Eregbu

Tertiary Dimensions is a group exhibition featuring artists Aay Preston-Myint, Adam Liam Rose + Alex Zak, Amina Ross, Betsy Odom, Elijah Burgher, Gordon Hall, Katie Vota, Kiam Marcelo Junio, Margaret Bobo Dancy, Matt Morris, Oli Rodriguez, and Rami George.

 

 

This exhibition unveils the artists’ sensitivity to space and how such material practices propose an alternative, non-binary platforms for the queer and/or collective body. This platform becomes a meaningful tool against oppressive structures which limit pleasure, desire, visibility, and mobility. Here, we might further examine how these artists consider the queer body in space amongst the domestic, the architectural, the landscape, public or private sectors— and how the collision between such domains might summon, conjure, or propose a third space. In some cases, we might witness artwork that is inherently political and readily accessible because it is unlawful. In other instances, we encounter artwork that leaves us with an uncanny, yet beautiful remnant of itself, that it is hardly identifiable. From sculpture to photography, drawing to video, we observe such concerns of new dimensionality and depth articulated via mappings, site-specific installations, material explorations, and personal collections.

The exhibition organized as part of Platforms: 10 Years of Chances Dances — a multi-site series of exhibitions and events in celebration of 10 years of  Chicago-based queer collective, Chances Dances.

Tertiary Dimensions, 2014. Curated by Alexandria Eregbu. Installation view, Sector 2337, Chicago. Photo by Clare Britt.

Tertiary Dimensions, 2014. Curated by Alexandria Eregbu. Installation view, Sector 2337, Chicago. Photo by Clare Britt.

 

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Tertiary Dimensions, 2014. Curated by Alexandria Eregbu. Installation view, Sector 2337, Chicago. Photo by Clare Britt.

 

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Gordon Hall, Set (X), 2015. Joint compound and pigment on wood. Photo by Clare Britt.

 

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Tertiary Dimensions, 2014. Curated by Alexandria Eregbu. Installation view, Sector 2337, Chicago. Left: Betsy Odom, Double Bull, 2015. Leather. Right: Rami George, Untitled (scene from a still), 2014. Archival pigment prints. Photo by Clare Britt.

 

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Tertiary Dimensions, 2014. Curated by Alexandria Eregbu. Installation view, Sector 2337, Chicago. Photo by Clare Britt.

 

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Tertiary Dimensions, 2014. Curated by Alexandria Eregbu. Installation view, Sector 2337, Chicago. Photo by Clare Britt.

 

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Tertiary Dimensions, 2014. Curated by Alexandria Eregbu. Installation view, Sector 2337, Chicago. Photo by Clare Britt.

 

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Adam Liam Rose + Alex Zak, Operational Intercourse, 2015. Cardboard, rope, sheetrock, window blinds, black velvet. Photo by Clare Britt.

 

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Tertiary Dimensions, 2014. Curated by Alexandria Eregbu. Installation view, Sector 2337, Chicago. Photo by Clare Britt.

About the Artists:

Aay Preston-Myint is an artist, printmaker, and educator based in Chicago, IL. His practice employs both visual and collaborative strategies to investigate memory and kinship, within the context of queer community and history. In addition to his own work in interdisciplinary media, he is a founder of No Coast, an artist partnership that prints and distributes affordable contemporary artwork, serves as a DJ and organizer for Chances Dances, party that supports and showcases the work of queer artists in Chicago, and is editor-in-chief of an online and print journal called Monsters and Dust. 


Adam Liam Rose + Alex Zak are interdisciplinary artists and partners working between Chicago and New York. They explore issues involving spatial politics, materiality, and identity. Rose works with malleable barriers and charged geographical lines to explore nationalist agendas within architecture and space. Zak works quickly with a sense of urgency to recognize markers of power, access, and labor with craft materials and silly putty. In collaborating, they are concerned with how their geographical identities and queer sentiments affect their views, conversations, and relationship.

Amina Ross is a transdisciplinary Chicago-based artist. Through visual abstraction she creates palatable tensions of repulsion and seduction. The conceptions of black visuality and the sexualized image are combined through a blending of image, writing, performance, curatorial and installation work. She has shown work at numerous venues including the Black Cinema House, Woman Made Gallery, Links Hall and Defibrillator Performance Art Gallery. She has spoken on panels and taught workshops at College Arts Association Conference, Black Artist Retreat, Threewalls and The School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Amina is committed to creating spaces that foster thinking, conversation, growth and love. These ambitions manifested in the founding of 3rd Language, queer arts collective; which has received the Propeller Fund grant and Davis Foundation awards for its summer workshops series. Amina holds a BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and is currently a teaching artist at Hyde Park Art Center.  She is a part of Chicago Artist Coalition’s BOLT residency 2015-2016 cohort.

Betsy Odom received her MFA from Yale University School of Art and her BFA from the San Francisco Art Institute. She has exhibited internationally in group and solo exhibitions at venues including Glass Curtain Gallery in Chicago, Amel Bourorina Gallery in Berlin, and Rudolph Projects in Houston, TX. Recent solo exhibitions include 4WPS, ThreeWalls Gallery, Hyde Park Art Center, and Woman Made Gallery. Odom has been the recipient of several fellowships including an Illinois Arts Council Grant, a Chances Dances Critical Fierceness prize, and grant from the Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs. Her work became part of the West Collection in 2012. 

Elijah Burgher makes small, colored pencil drawings that utilize ideas from magick and the occult to address sexuality, sub-cultural formation and the history of abstraction. Citing early 20th century occultist, Austin Osman Spare’s system, Burgher draws sigils—emblems to which magical power is imputed. By recombining the letters that spell out a wish into a new symbol, Burgher’s pictures of sigils literally encode desire while embodying it abstractly through shape, color and composition. Through precise, repetitive marks, he endows his drawings with a sense of all-over intentionality. His figurative works often depict naked men conducting rituals in rented rooms or wooded landscapes. They draw the ritual circle, invoke the dead, or cut symbols into one another. Others portray counter-cultural queer icons or betray a prurient attitude towards art history’s storehouse of imagery. At stake are a concern with human relationality and a desire to close the gap between fantasy and reality. Burgher has exhibited in solo shows at Western Exhibitions, Chicago (2013, 2012); 2nd Floor Projects, San Francisco (2011); and Shane Campbell Gallery, Oak Park (2010); and two-persons shows at Lump, Raleigh (2012); and Peregrine Program, Chicago (2009). He was included in the 2014 Whitney Biennial. Recent group shows exhibitions at Cabinet (2014) and Hales Gallery (2014), London; Exile (2014), Berlin; Witte de With, Rotterdam (2013), H.F. Johnson Gallery of Art, Kenosha (2012); 92YTribeca (2012), New York City. His work was recently included in Phaidon’s Vitamin D2, a survey of contemporary drawing practices. In 2011, he was a resident artist at both the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture and the Fire Island Artist Residency. Burgher has taught in Contemporary Practices and Painting and Drawing since Fall 2010. He received a MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 2004, and a BA from Sarah Lawrence College, Bronxville, in 2000, where he studied Literature. 

Gordon Hall is an artist based in New York. Hall has exhibited and performed at SculptureCenter, The Kitchen, Movement Research, EMPAC, The Brooklyn Museum, The Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, Whitney Museum of American Art, Night Club, Kent Fine Art, Foxy Production, The Hessel Museum at Bard College, White Columns, and at Chapter NY, among others. Hall has also organized programs as the Center for Experimental Lectures at MoMA PS1, Recess, The Shandaken Project, Alderman Exhibitions, and at the Whitney Museum of American Art, producing a series of lectures and seminars in conjunction with the 2014 Whitney Biennial. Hall’s writing and interviews have been featured in a variety of publications including V Magazine, Randy, Bomb, Title Magazine, What About Power? Inquiries Into Contemporary Sculpture (published by SculptureCenter, 2014) and in Theorizing Visual Studies (Routledge, 2012). Hall was awarded a Triangle Arts Foundation Residency in 2015, the LMCC Workspace Residency for 2013-14, attended the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in 2013, the Fire Island Artist Residency in 2012, and ACRE in 2010 and 2011. Hall holds an MFA and an MA in Visual and Critical Studies from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. 

Katie Vota is a Chicago-based artist working to create interactive environments and sculptural objects that engage viewers in ideas of play, desire, pleasure, power exchange, and the role of the active body in shaping identity. Vota received her BFA from the Maryland Institute College of Art (2010, magna cum laude) and a Studio MFA from the School of the Arts Institute of Chicago (2015). She was awarded a US Student Fulbright Grant (’11-’12) to study traditions of Andean Back-strap Weaving and Natural Dyeing in Cusco, Peru, with the Center for Traditional Textiles of Cusco. Vota has exhibited in numerous solo and juried exhibitions, at venues including Threewalls (Chicago), The Leroy Neiman Center Gallery (Chicago), Pratt MPW School of Art Gallery (Utica, NY), The Krasl Art Center (St. Joseph, MI), The Indianapolis Art Center (Indianapolis), and Area 405 (Baltimore). She is a Lenore Tawney Foundation Scholar, and has participated in residencies such as ISLAND (the Institute for Sustainable Art and Natural Design) in Traverse City, MI. 

Kiam Marcelo Junio (preferred gender pronoun: “they/their/them”) is a Chicago-based interdisciplinary artist creating work through photography, video, installation, performance, and hybrid forms. Their research and art practice centers around queer identities, Philippine history and the Filipino diaspora, American imperialism, the politics of visibility, and social justice through collaborative processes and healing modalities. Kiam served seven years in the US Navy as a Hospital Corpsman.  Kiam is the sole proprietor of IAMKIAM STUDIOS, a portrait and event photography, videography, promotional and media production company based in Chicago. They were born in the Philippines, and have lived in the U.S., Japan, and Spain. 

Margaret Bobo Dancy is a Video and Sculpture artist living and producing in Chicago. She received her BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 2013. Margaret has exhibited nationally at the Spectacle Theatre of New York City and with the Nomadic Limbs Dance Collective in Milwaukee. Bobo-Dancy has been a part of exhibitions in Chicago including Woman Made Gallery, the Nightingale Theatre, The Defibrillator, and the Fulton Street Art Collective. Her work has been highlighted in the Chicago Reader and the online art forum Hyperallergic. She is the recent recipient of the Chances Dances ‘Critical Fierceness Grant’ to finalize sculptures from her most recent body of work, “Transverberate”.

Matt Morris is an artist, writer, and sometimes curator based in Chicago. He has presented artwork at Queer Thoughts, peregrineprogram, The Bike Room, Gallery 400, Sector 2337, and The Franklin in Chicago, IL; Fjord and Vox Populi in Philadelphia, PA; The Contemporary Arts Center, U·turn Art Space, Aisle, and semantics in Cincinnati, OH; Clough-Hanson Gallery and Beige in Memphis, TN; with additional projects in Reims, France; Greencastle, IN; Lincoln, NE; and Baton Rouge, LA. Morris is a transplant from southern Louisiana who holds a BFA from the Art Academy of Cincinnati, and earned an MFA in Art Theory + Practice from Northwestern University, as well as a Certificate in Gender + Sexuality Studies. Recent curatorial efforts have been presented at Western Exhibitions and The Hills Esthetic Center in Chicago, IL. He is a lecturer at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago who teaches in the Sculpture as well as the Painting and Drawing departments. He is a contributor to Artforum.com, Art Papers, Flash Art, Newcity, and Sculpture; and his writing appears in numerous exhibition catalogues and artist monographs. 

Oli Rodriguez is an interdisciplinary artist working in video, photography and performance. A Chicago native, he began his undergraduate career at DePaul University studying Psychology, Gender Studies and Photography. Oli then pursued his MFA at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in the Film, Video, New Media and Animation Department. His projects often conceptually intersect and dialogue within consent, queerness, childhood and sexuality. Oli has screened, performed, lectured and exhibited at such institutions and museums such as, The Banff Centre, Schwarzer Kanal, Berlin, Germany, Smart Museum, University of Chicago, Bridge Art Fair, New York, NY, Co-Prosperity Sphere, Chicago IL, Hyde Park Art Center, Chicago, IL, X Initiative Gallery, New York, NY, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, Columbia College Chicago, Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, Gene Siskel Chicago and The Swimming Pool Project Space, Chicago, Nightingale, Chicago, IL. Currently, he is faculty in the Photography Department at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. 

Rami George was born in the summer of ‘89, a year known for its numerous revolutions, the signing of the Taif Agreement (beginning the end of the Lebanese Civil War), and the conception of the World Wide Web. They spent a childhood marked by these and other significant events. Completing their BFA at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 2012, they have exhibited and screened internationally. They continue to be influenced and motivated by political struggles and missing narratives. 

About the Curator:

Alexandria Eregbu is a visual artist whose work often takes shape in the form of performance, programming, and curatorial practices. Her concerns frequently address community, materiality, performativity, and visibility of racialized and gendered bodies in space. In 2012, Eregbu was commissioned by Out of Site Chicago to perform 11/10/10, a project that confronted the physical and geographical boundaries of the city of Chicago. The following year in 2013, Eregbu curated Marvelous Freedom/Vigilance of Desire, Revisited at Columbia College Chicago. This curatorial project reexamined the first Marvelous Freedom/Vigilance of Desire— a Surrealist exhibition that took place in Chicago in 1976. Eregbu’s work has been featured in two solo exhibitions and several group exhibitions including Seminar (New York); Exodus at the University of Chicago’s Arts Incubator in Washington Park; and Mythologies at Sullivan Galleries (Chicago). Eregbu was a recipient of the Propeller Fund Grant (2013), a 2014-2015 Resident Curator with HATCH Projects at Chicago Artists Coalition, and a Public Studio Artist in Residence at the Chicago Cultural Center. Eregbu received her BFA from the School of the Arts Institute of Chicago. She was recently highlighted in Newcity’s Breakout Artists 2015: Chicago’s Next Generation of Image Makers and is anticipating a Curatorial Fellowship and Artist Residency with ACRE this upcoming year.

 

EsauMcGhee,

Blackitolism

Esau McGhee

Opening reception on Saturday, Aug 22 from 8-10pm

The Green Lantern Press is pleased to present Blackitolism, a window installation by Chicago-based artist, Esau McGhee. Produced in tandem with the Terrain Bienniale, Blackitolism will be visible from the street 24 hours a day, seven days a week from August 23 — September 30th, teasing late night pedestrians with a-typical advertisement. Part concrete poem, part neon sculpture, part print edition, McGhee’s work toys with the power of suggestion and the idiosyncrasy of desire.

The 2015 Terrain Biennial will take place in multiple locations in Oak Park, River Forest, and Chicago as well as Los Angeles and Dallas. The opening event will be at 704 highland Ave. 3-10 pm on Sunday August 23rd, with performances and events by Aram Han Sifuentes, Sarah Beth Woods/ Tracers; True Touch Spa/ Rachel Ellison; Fatimata Traore; Holly Rae Harrell; Caleb Yono; The Haxan 5 with Bruce Neal, Sean DeSantis, Matt Silcock, Catie Olson and EC Brown and DJ dance event by Chances Dances. Bad at Sports will host a talk show project throughout the day @ Terrain and Inside the Artist Kitchen will host a pie eating (and throwing) event.  

 

Esau McGhee, Blackitolism, 2014. Installation view, Sector 2337, Chicago. Photo by Clare Britt.

Esau McGhee, Blackitolism, 2014. Installation view, Sector 2337, Chicago. Photo by Clare Britt.

Artist CV / Bio: Much of Esau McGhee’s research and artistic practice concentrates on a critique of image construction through strategies of image making. Beginning with his photographic investigation of urban space in his native Philadelphia he has increasingly honed in on the topics of class and race construction. His most recent work has shifted from conventional strategies of representation, be it the use of the camera lens or traditional collage, to sculptural practice and large-scale installation of grid based printed works. In both cases he has deployed the found object as a strategy to further investigate the constructed image, focusing on the “image” of urban racial construction and the site of its consumption.

About Terrain: Terrain Exhibitions is committed to producing spontaneous interactions between the viewers and artworks by creating opportunities for artists to make site responsive installations that redefine the definition of public art. In a massive expansion for the 2nd Biennial, Terrain has reached out to sites all across the country as well as internationally. This year, the Biennial includes cities in Illinois near Oak Park like Chicago, and Morris, as well as states and countries such as Wisconsin, Tennessee, South Dakota, North Carolina, Texas, California; Denmark; Ontario and Cambodia. 75 artists and 3 collectives are creating site interventions at 60 locations. An interactive website will provide access to information, documentation and additional events for all sites.

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elsetime

A Solo Exhibition by Ellen Rothenberg

CHICAGO — The Green Lantern Press is pleased to present elsetime, a solo exhibition by Ellen Rothenberg at Sector 2337. Featuring new work in a wide range of media from photography, performance, and installation, elsetime examines the difficulty of artistic lineage exploring history’s dislocated presence. Central to Rothenberg’s artistic retcon is the image of her walking in the study of Bertolt Brecht. How can plans for a future protest affect the furniture of the past? Rothenberg expands from there, refracting through additionally (and personally) significant figures like Stefan Brecht and Simone Forti, along with temporally specific locales like post-war Berlin, Woodstock, and downtown New York; layering these sites and personae, Rothenberg traces a range of influences through objects and sometimes ambiguous politics. elsetime is the material culmination of the artist negotiating, inserting, and revising past and future selves in the present now. A series of public programs entitled “Not to be Taken,” is an additional elements of elsetime. Not to be Taken Performance Series invites select artists and thinkers to publicly use elsetime as a generative studio space in which she can engage questions about legacy and politics, place and time, through discrete actions; these subjective, ephemeral responses momentarily transform the exhibition with the performer’s unique potential.

May 9 – July 3, 2015
Curated by Caroline Picard

For more information related to the exhibit:
• Complete installation view
• Not to be Taken performance series

Ellen Rothenberg, elsetime, 2015, (installation view) Sector 2337, Chicago. Photo by Clare Britt.

Ellen Rothenberg, elsetime, 2015. Installation view, Sector 2337, Chicago. Photo by Clare Britt.

 

“One of things that’s really striking about this show was all of the overlapping temporalities. As someone who works on photography, I’ve been really interested in the presentness of the past and I think that different pasts are very present in this exhibition in a way that I find really exciting and engaging.” Hannah B Higgins, Shawn Smith, and Ellen Rothenberg appeared in conversation on May 30, 2015.

 

Documentation of Not to be Taken performance series

Not to be Taken invites select artists and thinkers to publicly use elsetime as a generative studio space in which she can engage questions about legacy and politics, place and time, through discrete actions; these subjective, ephemeral responses momentarily transform the exhibition with the performer’s unique potential.

Terri Kapsalis, Anne Elizabeth Moore, and Tim Schwartz, Not to be Taken, June 20, 2015. This three-part performance action involved a reading of pulp detective novel excerpts, an improvised conversation, and a sung recitation. Photo by Ellen Rothenberg.

Mark Booth & Becky Grajeda's Saturday Not to be Taken performance.

Mark Booth & Becky Grajeda,  Not to be Taken,  June 13, 2015. Photo by Jesse Eisenberg.  Grajeda and Booth organized a series of actions that involved recording the movement of chairs around the gallery, musical compositions, and spoken recitation.

Dao Nguyen, Not to be Taken, May 30, 2015. Nguyen created a five-act performance that involved a Janis Joplin track and on-going reconfiguration of chairs.

Alexandria Eregbu, Not to be Taken, May 23, 2015. For this Saturday action, Eregbu asked participants to reenact Simone Forti’s “Huddle.” Photo by Deanna Ledezma.

Tim Kinsella, Not to be Taken, May 16, 2015. Kinsella builds a dashiki fort before reading a biographical account of his preceding 24 hours. Photo by Caroline Picard.

Artist CV / Bio
Ellen Rothenberg’s work is concerned with the politics of everyday life and the formation of communities through collaborative practices. Her installations and public projects often employ the iconography of social movements and their residual documents to interrogate the mechanisms underlying contemporary political engagement and social dialogue. Her work—architecturally scaled installations, public projects, performance, collaborations, and writing —uncovers histories embedded in the present, particularly those of women, labor, and feminism. Her approach to form and material is informed by these concerns, and inflect meaning beyond their historical conventions. Her work has been presented in North America and Europe at The Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; The Museum of Fine Arts and The Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston; The Museum of London, Ontario; The Contemporary Jewish Museum, San Francisco; The Neues Museum Weserburg, Bremen; Royal Festival Hall, London; The Brukenthal National Museum, Sibiu, Romania; among others. Awards include NEA Regional Fellowships, The Bunting Institute Fellowship Radcliffe College Harvard University, Illinois Arts Council Fellowships, The Massachusetts Artist Foundation Fellowships, and grants from CEC Artslink, The Charles Engelhard Foundation, The LEF Foundation, and NEA Artists Projects. Rothenberg teaches at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago and at the Vermont College Fine Arts Graduate Program

REVIEWS
“Anyone prepared to spend time with the work will be rewarded, not with answers, but with a deepened appreciation of how unnecessary such summaries are.”
—Artslant:  May 27, 2015, “The Personal Is Political: Ellen Rothenberg at Sector 2337″ by James Pepper Kelley

“Elsetime” is an operation in ways to proceed forward, a challenging exhibition that provides rewards if you want them.”
—Newcity Art:  June 13, 2015, RECOMMENDED: Ellen Rothenberg at Sector 2337 by Chris Reeves

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Please Don’t Bury Me Alive! Parts One + Two

April/May Artists in Residence: Josh Rios & Anthony Romero

While in residence at Sector 2337, Josh Rios and Anthony Romero will present a two-part project titled Please Don’t Bury Me Alive!. Part One, a performative lecture, brings various gestures associated with pedagogy and theater together in a zone of imaginative investigation, a zone where diverse interests like speculative Chicana/o futures and the Othering of Modernism can co-mingle in uncommon and unpremeditated ways. Part Two, an installation staged in the project space, draws on vernacular forms of picture collecting and display indicative of mood boards, bulletin boards, and other casual approaches to aggregating images and objects. Specifically, the installation embraces the visual pleasure of presenting and arranging an excess of Chicana/o centered images where they would not appear otherwise.

Please Don’t Bury Me Alive! Part One (Action, Lecture, Screening)

At 7pm on April 16th, Josh Rios and Anthony Romero will present Part One of Please Don’t Bury Me Alive!—a performative lecture that brings various gestures associated with pedagogy and theater together in a zone of imaginative investigation, a zone where diverse interests like speculative Chicana/o futures and the Othering of Modernism can co-mingle in uncommon and unpremeditated ways. Doors open at 630 pm. This event is free.

Please Don’t Bury Me Alive! Part Two 

Josh Rios & Anthony Romero. “Please, Don’t Bury Me Alive! Part Two.” Installation view, Sector 2337, 2015. Photo by Clare Britt.

Josh Rios & Anthony Romero. “Please, Don’t Bury Me Alive! Part Two.” Installation view, Sector 2337, 2015. Photo by Clare Britt.

Josh Rios & Anthony Romero. “Please, Don’t Bury Me Alive! Part Two.” Installation view, Sector 2337, 2015. Photo by Clare Britt.

Josh Rios & Anthony Romero. “Please, Don’t Bury Me Alive! Part Two.” Installation view, Sector 2337, 2015. Photo by Clare Britt.

Josh Rios & Anthony Romero. “Please, Don’t Bury Me Alive! Part Two.” Installation view, Sector 2337, 2015. Photo by Clare Britt.

Josh Rios & Anthony Romero. “Please, Don’t Bury Me Alive! Part Two.” Installation view, Sector 2337, 2015. Photo by Clare Britt.

 

Josh Rios & Anthony Romero. “Please, Don’t Bury Me Alive! Part Two.” Installation view, Sector 2337, 2015. Photo by Clare Britt.

 

Anthony Romero and Josh Rios, both originally from south Texas, now live and work in Chicago. Over the past several years they have been developing various performances, 2 and 3 dimensional works, curatorial projects, installations, writings, and screenings that deal with the experience of being US citizens of Mexican origin in these challenging times. Broadly speaking, their collaborative works center on contemporary Chicana/o aesthetics, the elided histories of the Chicana/o struggle, and the dismissal of Chicana/o contributions to US culture in general.

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Everything Is Still Really Interesting

A Solo Exhibition by Kuras & MacKenzie

Opening reception on Thursday, Feb 12 from 7-9 pm

The Green Lantern Press and Sector 2337 are pleased to present Everything Is Still Really Interesting, the latest exhibition by collaborative duo Kuras & MacKenzie. The opening will coincide with the launch of their new book, Diagrams (The Green Lantern Press, 2015), and take place at Sector 2337.

The Green Lantern Press and Sector 2337 are pleased to present Everything Is Still Really Interesting, the latest exhibition by collaborative duo Kuras & MacKenzie. The opening will coincide with the launch of their new book, Diagrams (The Green Lantern Press, 2015), and take place at Sector 2337.

The title of the exhibition hints at a moment in time — “still” suggests something that has passed, but hasn’t yet entirely disappeared. What is it that persists? A remnant, a feeling, an after taste. A naive interest in the world, perhaps, it persists as some vague but committed idealism — whether authentic or the product of Romantic thinking, the artists do not differentiate. Either way, any residual “naiveté” is complicated. Everything Is Still Really Interesting muddles through the oppositional poles of lofty hope and hard-won cynicism, leaving the art object to mark moments in an ongoing conversation.

The works in this exhibition are eclectic and varied in subject and media, reflecting the artists’ omni-vorous collaborative practice. In its search for sources of energy and inspiration, Kuras & MacKenzie’s investigations typically culminate in paintings, sculptures, prints, and site-specific installations. Everything Is Still Really Interesting continues the lineage of those concerns.

For the last decade, Kuras & MacKenzie’s work has sought to embody and confront the tension between imagination and practicality, control and helplessness. Part of the human condition assumes a capacity to exert some control over one’s life, while anticipating the collapse of that illusion. The question raised in the aftermath is practical and imaginative at once: how does one respond to disappointment?

The artists suggest simply: “enthusiastically” embrace whatever is left.

In their own words Kuras & MacKenzie, “…stumble on punch drunk, over-extended, under-actualized, but optimistic and cautiously bemused. The inevitability of finitude hasn’t crowded in on us yet, for us there is no need for resignation.” The works in Everything Is Still Really Interesting point to a lasting enchantment with the universe, to an optimistic belief in the possibilities life among humans can afford, despite or because of the everyday melodrama in personal office politics.
The only bio we could wring out of them reads…

Kuras & Mackenzie is a partnership of Christian Kuras and Duncan MacKenzie. They have been working together for lots of years etc etc. Duncan is based in Chicago, and Christian is in Manchester UK: there, now you know something about them.

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Jane Jerardi: November Artist-in-Residence

with a looped screening of "Efficiency" (2005) in the Sector Project Space & an artist workshop on November 9th

November 07 – December 06, 2014

November 9, 2-3:30pm Artist Workshop

This event is affiliated with The New [New] Corpse

Jane Jerardi is a time-based artist working in the media of choreography, performance, and video. She has created work for a variety of contexts — from theaters and galleries to record store listening booths, public subway escalators, audio walks, and projected videos — constructing pieces that often move fluidly between media.

In addition to screening her film and organizing a workshop, while in residence Jane Jerardi will develop a new piece, with the working title Tenuous. Drawing on DeLillo’s Cosmopolis, an article about immortal jellyfish, and interviews with security guards, Jerardi’s new choreographed work explores strategies of control in every day life, and the sense of uncertainty.

“I don’t own a watch or clock. I think of time in other totalities now. I think of my personal time-span set against the vast numerations, the time of the earth, the stars, the incoherent light-years, the age of the universe, etc. World is supposed to mean something that’s self-contained. But nothing is self-contained. Everything enters something else. My small days spill into light-years.” -Don DeLillo, Cosmopolis

About Efficiency (2005) Video documentation from a performance work by Jane Jerardi. Efficiency originated from a Washington Post commentary that looked at our incessant desire for hyper-efficiency all in the quest for more free-time— tracing its roots to the industrial revolution and the way it permeates contemporary life. Despite more and more technological advancements and methods for speed — from smartphones to email, transportation to exercise regiments — increased efficiency never seems to quite live up to its promise of more ‘free’ time. Documentation from this work captures abstract choreography against a backdrop of fast-paced urban life in an exploration of the ordinary intimacies that crop up between strangers. It reflects on how our labors seem to disconnect us from ourselves and our relationships. Images of a swimming pool allude to some the fantasy and desire for inefficiency — removed from the office and everyday commutes. With an original score by UK experimenter Scanner (aka Robin Rimbaud) and video projections create in collaboration with Michael Wichita, the piece features Brian Buck, Jane Jerardi, and Nicholette Routhier. Efficiency was commissioned by Washington Performing Arts Society on the occasion of its 40th anniversary season, with support from the Eugene and Agnes E. Meyer Foundation. The creation of Efficiency was also funded in part by the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities, an agency supported in part by the National Endowment for the Arts.

Exercising Inefficiency : a workshop
Sunday Nov 9, from 2-3:30 pm

What if you already are everything you needed? You didn’t need to work harder, or faster, or more efficiently to ‘get ahead’? That in fact there was no getting ahead and instead you might slow down and become aware of your body to realize you are already here. You might ‘exercise inefficiency’ in a strident refusal — or subtle resistance — to everything telling you to be faster and more productive. Come practice inefficiency on Sunday Nov 9, from 2-3:30 pm. A mix of relaxation, breathing, meditation and movement exercises will aid us in traveling into body-time. Open to all – all ages, sizes, types, experience, people. While this event is free, space is limited, so please RSVP via facebook or send an email to caroline@sector2337.com

The New New Corpse

The New [New] Corpse

Featuring Benjamin L. Aman & Marion Auburtin, Joseph Grigely, Young Joon Kwak, Jason Lazarus, Carlos Martiel, Heather Mekkelson, Aay Preston-Myint, Rachel Niffenegger, Xaviera Simmons, Shane Ward, and Shoshanna Weinberger; with Jane Jerardi as our November Studio Resident.

CHICAGO — For its inaugural exhibition, Sector 2337 presents The New [New] Corpse, a group show produced by The Green Lantern Press with thirteen artists whose work in photography, sculpture, performance, film, and drawing wrestles with representation to show how the figure appears fragmented, distorted, or emphatically absent. These artists exhume the human body to study the material networks by which it is comprised. Xaviera Simmons shows an appropriated photograph of migrants on a boat. French artists Benjamin L. Aman and Marion Auburtin present ceramic music boxes that turn like grotesque curiosities. Recent Whitney Biennial participant Joseph Grigely offers expired New York Time sclippings with the figure frozen and silent listening or mid-song. Heather Mekkelson includes the material excerpts of human activity and Rachel Niffenegger’s painted fabric hangs loose, torn and painted like a dress. Shoshanna Weinberger and Young Joon Kwak each explore an estranged and modified body, while Jason Lazarus photographs a blurred chair, emphasizing the body’s absence. Throughout each of these portrayals, representation is skewed, and unfixed — as copies of images in flux, emerging in foreign mediums that themselves have material properties: metal, cake, photography, facsimile, dust. Carlos Martiel documents a performance where he lay on ice for as long as possible, until his body temperature lowered to numbness. Shane Ward’s sculpture is a deteriorated cast of a Roman artifact, and Aay Preston-Myint installs an edible homage to utopic ideals. Within this constellation of works, a postulate emerges: the human figure is no longer defined by stable boundaries, but is rather embedded in a network of fluctuating nonhuman parts.

This exhibit is part of Chicago Artists Month. 

The New [New] Corpse Installation View, 2014.

The New [New] Corpse Installation View, Sector 2337, 2014. Photo by Joseph Rynkiewicz.

See more installation images here.

BIOS

Benjamin L. Aman (b.1981, Rouen, France) Lives and works in Berlin. Currently in residency at La Cité Internationale des Arts, Paris. Benjamin Laurent Aman is a sound and visual artist whose work oscillates between drawing, sculpture and sound, most frequently echoing each other and flowing from a range of perceptions combining a physical, a mental and an emotional approach. Using techniques of collage and spatial shifts, Aman’s constructions invite the public to travel through undetermined zones, invested by a particular sense of place where reflections and life are organized. Since 2005, Aman’s work has been exhibited in numerous group exhibitions (Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris, CAC Nei Liicht Luxembourg, Selasar Sunaryo Museum Bandung, Space London) and dedicated ones (Styx Projects, Able Kulturverein, Atelier KSR in Berlin, Kunstraum Michael Barthel in Leipzig). Since 2007, BLA has carried out many sound performances all over Europe. He has been invited to festivals and radio shows (Epsilonia in Paris, Le tétraèdre in Bruxelles, The Wire on Air, Resonance FM in London…) and performed at the 10th Berlin Biennale, Transmediale X, Club Transmediale (CTM) and Nu Substance Indonesia amongst others. In 2009, Aman founded the Razzle Dazzle label, publishing items related to fine arts and sound.

Marion Auburtin (b. 1978, France) During the past 10 years, French artist Marion Auburtin has been focusing her work on painting miniatures, following a long and meticulous process of work with a maniac and distant approach. In recalling early Renaissance masters, still life, anatomical studies or film noirs images, Auburtin produces objects and paintings that toy with reversible feelings like seduction and repulsion, training and perfection, luxury and death, beauty and deformity, etc…Graduated from ENSA Nancy (Fine Arts Academy of Nancy). She lives and works in Berlin and Paris. Currently residing at the Cité Internationale des Arts in Paris, she took part in numerous exhibitions and projects in Europe like Evil Clowns (HMKV Dortmund), Perturbations (Musée Fabre Montpellier), Sleep Disorders (Nei Liicht Contemporary Art Center Luxembourg), Légère éclaircie (Galerie White Project, Paris), Equinox (Grimmuseum Berlin)… She ‘s been supported by the French Art Council twice and her work is part of several collections including: The Colas Fondation, Ravini­Bourriaud, Corréard, and Vidal. She has been selected for Le Prix Novembre de Vitry and Le Salon de Montrouge (Paris), and has had solo shows in Germany (Total gallery Berlin, Able gallery Berlin), Luxembourg (Dominique LangContemporary Art Center Luxembourg) and France (Galerie 9 Nancy).

Joseph Grigely is an artist and critical theorist. His exhibitions include solo shows at the Musée d’art Moderne in Paris; The Douglas Hyde Gallery, Dublin; The Whitney Museum of American Art; and the MCA, Chicago. His group shows include the Whitney, Venice, Berlin, Istanbul and Sydney Biennials. He is represented by Gallery Air de Paris, Paris.

Young Joon Kwak (b. 1984) is an LA-based artist and performer. She has had solo exhibitions in Chicago and LA, most recently at Commonwealth and Council (LA) in September 2014.  She performs in the band Xina Xurner, and is co-founder of Mutant Salon. Kwak received her MFA from USC Roski School of Art & Design, MA from the University of Chicago, and BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Jason Lazarus (b. 1975) is a Chicago based artist, curator, writer, and educator–he is currently an Adjunct Assistant Professor at the School of the Art Institute, Chicago, IL. Lazarus’ work has recently been examined by Michelle Grabner (monograph published by University Galleries of Illinois State University), Abigail Solomon-Godeau (monograph published by SF Camerawok), Shane Lavalette (monograph published by Light Work), Lori Waxman (Art Forum), and Carmen Winant (Frieze Magazine).  Major exhibitions include Black Is, Black Ain’t at the Renaissance Society, Love to Love You at MASS MoCA, On the Scene at the Art Institute of Chicago, Not the Way You Remembered at the Queens Museum of Art, Image Search at PPOW Gallery in NYC, and Michael Jackson Doesn’t Quit, Part 3 at the Future Gallery, Berlin. Recent solo exhibitions include Jason Lazarus: Chicago Works at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, Live Archive at the Contemporary Jewish Museum in San Francisco, and THTK (Toronto) at Gallery TPW in Toronto, CA.  In 2016, Lazarus is commissioned to mount a site-specific vernacular photography installation for the re-opening of SF MOMA’s Photography Wing, this installation will become part of the SF MOMA permanent collection. Jason is a Co-Founder and Co-Editor of Chicago Artist Writers, an online art criticism platform that asks artists and art workers to write traditional and experimental criticism that serves non-profit, temporary, and alternative arts programming in Chicago. Throughout 2014, he will be screening internationally a feature length film comprised entirely of animated GIFS called twohundredfiftysixcolors, a collaboration with Eric Fleischauer.

Carlos Martiel (b. Havana) is a controversial Cuban artist specializing in performance. His works focus on specific political events and on social injustices that occurr inside and outside his country of origin. Martiel’s performances reflect on the relations of power between the individual and the different contexts in which he or she operates. He graduated from the National Academy of Fine Arts “San Alejandro,” Havana in 2009. Between the years of 2008-2010, he studied in the Catedra de Arte Conducta, directed by the artist Tania Bruguera. Martiel’s works have been included in: Havana Biennial (2009), Pontevedra Biennal (2010), Liverpool Biennial ( 2010), Biennial “La Otra,” Bogotá ( 2013); International Performance Art Biennale, Houston,(2014). He has had solo exhibitions at the Contemporary Art Center “Wifredo Lam,” Havana (2012); Nitsch Museum, Naples (2013); Axeneo 7, Montreal (2013); Lux Gallery, Guatemala City (2013); and Steve Turner Contemporary, Los Angeles (2014). He has received several awards, including “CIFOS Grants & Commissions Program Award” in Miami, 2014; “Arte Laguna” in Venice, Italy, 2013; “Close Up Award” in Vallarta, Mexico, 2012. His work has been exhibited in Estonian Museum of Art and Design in Tallinn, Estonia; Museum of Modern Art of Buenos Aires in Argentina; Bellevue Museum of Arts, Washington; The 8th floor in New York, Arocena Museum in Mexico, among others

Heather Mekkelson lives and works in Chicago. Solo and two-person exhibitions include Now Slices at 65GRAND, Invisible Apocalypse at Roots & Culture; Heather Mekkelson at +medicine cabinet; Limited Entry at Old Gold; Debris Field at Threewalls; and Out Land at STANDARD (all Chicago, IL.) Her work has also been in group shows at INOVA (Milwaukee, WI), The Museum of Contemporary Photography (Chicago, IL), The Figge Art Museum (Davenport, IA), The Poor Farm (Manawa, WI), Raid Projects (Los Angeles, CA), and Vox Populi (Philadelphia, PA). Mekkelson’s work has been written about in Art Journal, Broadsheet, Time Out Chicago, New City, Chicago Tribune, Artforum.com and others. In 2012 she became an Artadia Award Chicago awardee. Mekkelson is represented in Chicago by 65GRAND.

Aay Preston-Myint is an artist, printmaker, and educator based in Chicago, IL. His practice currently employs visual and collaborative strategies to investigate memory, memorial, self-reflection and self-projection within the context of queer community and history. In addition to his own work in interdisciplinary media, he is a founder of No Coast, an artist partnership that prints and distributes affordable contemporary artwork, serves as a DJ and organizer for Chances Dances, party that supports and showcases the work of queer artists in Chicago, and is editor-in-chief of an online and print journal called Monsters and Dust.

Rachel Niffenegger recently returned to United States after a residency at De Ateliers in Amsterdam. While in Europe, she presented a solo show at Club Midnight in Berlin and was included in group shows at Museum for Modern Art in Arnhem and Bourouina Gallery in Berlin. She has been included in group shows at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago, Tracy Williams Ltd in NYC , Asya Geisberg in NYC, Ceri Hand Gallery in Liverpool, and in Chicago at Western Exhibitions  Corbett vs. Dempsey, Andrew Rafacz Gallery and the Hyde Park Art Center. Chicago Magazine named her “Chicago’s Best Emerging Artist” in 2010 and New City named her one of “Chicago’s Next Generation of Image Makers” in 2010. Niffenegger, born in Evanston in 1985, received her BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and her MFA from Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois in 2012.

Xaviera Simmons received her BFA from Bard College (2004) after spending two years on a walking pilgrimage retracing the transatlantic slave trade with Buddhist monks. She completed the Whitney Museum’s Independent Study Program in Studio Art (2005) while simultaneously completing a two year actor-training conservatory with The Maggie Flanigan Studio. Simmons has exhibited nationally and internationally where major exhibitions and performances include: The Museum of Modern Art, MoMA PS1, The Studio Museum in Harlem, The Contemporary Arts Museum Houston, The Public Art Fund, and The Sculpture Center. Selected solo and group exhibitions for 2013–2014 include Archive As Impetus at The Museum Of Modern Art; Underscore at The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum; Open at David Castillo Gallery; Rehearsals at The Savannah College Of Art and Design; and Radical Presence at The Studio Museum In Harlem among many others. Her works are in major museum and private collections including Deutsche Bank, UBS, The Guggenheim Museum, The Agnes Gund Art Collection, The Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, The Studio Museum in Harlem, MOCA Miami, and Perez Art Museum Miami.

Shane Ward (b. 1985) is an American artist who lives and works in Chicago. Ward’s work is dedicated to themes of war and romance, capital and masculinity, violence and emancipation, surface luster and value.  Ward is after the relationship between the grave and the monument, the mine and jewelry box, the wound and the mend.  Of late, he has thought of this as a sustained inquiry into the nature of victory, its relationship to liberty, and its ultimate fragility.

Ward earned his MFA from the University of Chicago in 2012 and received the Claire Rosen & Samuel Edes Foundation Prize for Emerging Artists in 2013. He currently teaches in the Sculpture Department at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Shoshanna Weinberger Born in Kingston, Jamaica in 1973 to a Jamaican-mother and American-father, Shoshanna was raised in Montclair, NJ. She currently lives and works in Newark, NJ. Her work has shown for the past decade nationally and internationallyfeatured in group shows: The New Authentics (Spertus Museum, Chicago, IL); New American Talent 18 (The Jones Center for Contemporary Art, Austin, TX); Acts of Alterity (Nomad Gallery, Brussels, Belgium); Empire (Five Myles, Brooklyn, NY); All That Glitters (The Gateway Project, Newark); Mutations (Tiwani Contemporary, London, England); America Through Artists’ Eyes (NJ State Museum, Trenton). Solo shows include: What Makes My Hottentot So Hot (Solos Project House, Newark, 2012); Sometimes All of Me is Not Enough (Carol Jazzar Contemporary Art, Miami, 2012); Potbelly Pin-Ups: Out of Many One (Woman Made Gallery, Chicago, 2014). She has also been featured in the National Gallery of Jamaica, 2012 Biennial, Kingston, JA and BIAC Martinique 2013 Biennial, French West Indies. Weinberger was featured in the Nov/Dec 2012 issue of Art Papers and awarded the First Prize in the 34th Bradley International Print and Drawing Exhibition, Bradley University, Peoria, IL (2013). Her work has been acquired by public collections: The Newark Museum, Newark, NJ; The Sagamore Collection, Miami; Girls Club Collection, Ft. Lauderdale and The Margulies Collection, Miami. Weinberger holds a BFA degree from The School of the Institute of Art in Chicago, 1995; and received a MFA degree from Yale School of Art, Yale University, 2003.

ABOUT OUR NOVEMBER RESIDENT:

Jane Jerardi is a time-based artist working in the media of choreography, performance, and video.  She has created work for a variety of contexts –- from theaters and galleries to record store listening booths, public subway escalators, audio walks, and projected videos –- constructing pieces that often move fluidly between media. A frequent collaborator, she has been fortunate to work with performers Heeran Lee, Ginger Wagg, Brian Buck and Maré Hieronimus; musicians Amy Farina (of The Evens), Scanner (aka Robin Rimbaud) and Lucas Zarwell; and artists Michael Wichita and Agata Olek, among many others, on her projects.  Her work has been presented by spaces such as 6018North, Defibrillator Performance Gallery and Links Hall (Chicago): the Joyce Soho, Danspace Project at St. Mark’s Church, the LUMEN Festival (in New York); and at Transformer, The Warehouse, Dance Place, and the Kennedy Center (in Washington, DC), as well as other venues.  She has been fortunate to receive support from the Creative Communities Fund of the National Captial Region as well as support from the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities through its Artist Fellowship, Young Emerging Artist, and New Media awards. She holds a MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in Performance and a BA from Hampshire College in Amherst, MA, where she studied choreography and cultural studies.  She is currently on faculty and staff at The Dance Center at Columbia College, Chicago.

Isolated Fictions_HPAC

Isolated Fictions: A Reenactment

Hyde Park Art Center : August 24 – November 23, 2014

Featuring Amanda Browder, Nick Butcher, Maria Dumlao, Jason Dunda, Rebecca Mir Grady, Nadine Nakanishi, Carmen Price, Steve Ruiz, and Hui-min Tsen. Curated by Caroline Picard

As invited by Whitney Oldenburg, Michael Leon, Mehmet Canevi, Andrew Giannakakis, Anthony Bragg, Fernando Pezzino, Jon Merritt, Katherine Darby, Sarah Pater, and Suzanne Gonzalez, for the Hyde Park Art Center’s exhibition, The Chicago Effect: Redefining the Middle.

“This time around, The Green Lantern…reprises its closing exhibition, a delightful celebration of the fleet of English sailors who in 1821 were icebound for nine months in the Arctic, during which time they produced weekly plays and a newspaper. Standouts from the show within a show include Hui-min Tsen’s “Moonscape in Earthlight,” a wondrously convincing peephols box, Amanda Browder’s cuddly quilted iceberg and an exquisite little gouache by Jason Dunda, which purports to illustrate ‘The Most Beautiful Searchlight in the World.” It’s just a floodlight on a rooftop, but to those stranded sailors any visible searchlight would surely have seemed superlative. (As it happens, The Green Lantern recently reopened in Logan Square. I like to imagine it was buoyed by its survivalist swan song.” — Lori Waxman, Chicago Tribune, (November 13, 2014).

“Exemplary of [The Chicago Effect: Redefining the Middle’s] strengths is a brief interlude in the middle of the main gallery marked by a stripe of grey paint that hangs on the walls and floor between two halves of the white cube… Isolated Fictions: A Reenactment, as the sub-show is titled, presents a provocative case study in the generative possibilities between art schools, small galleries, art centers, and other ‘middle men’ of the art economy.” — Elliot Reichert, Chicago Artist Writers.

In June 2014, The Green Lantern, a nonprofit publishing house and former apartment gallery, was invited by a group of Rhode Island School of Design students to reproduce one of The Green Lantern’s past exhibition in response to the Hyde Park Art Center’s Chicago Effect: Redefining the Middle. The resulting choice, Isolated Fictions, explores a curious incident in history when a fleet of English sailors found themselves icebound in the Arctic for nine months. In order to survive, they put on weekly plays and published a newspaper of theater reviews, inside jokes, poems and classified ads. The resulting periodical, The North Georgia Gazette, presents the sailors as an older, idiosyncratic DIY art collective whose activities arguably sustained the crew through a physically, and psychologically inhospitable environment. In the original exhibition, participating artists reflected upon that marginalized nautical history with their contributions. Original contributors, Amanda Browder, Nick Butcher, and Nadine Nakanishi include their original contributions at The Hyde Park Center. Otherwise the show has changed significantly and illustrates the way thought (and memory) shift over time. Carmen Price reinterprets his original painting using new strategies and materials, while Deb Sokolow invited artist Steve Ruiz to participate on her behalf. Jason Dunda submitted a different work, and two new artists, Maria Dumlao and Hui-min Tsen, entered the fold. Isolated Fictions: A Reenactment reflects the dynamic, ever-changing nature of history and the bearing it has on future communities. Three iterations of Isolated Fictions took place previously at AS220 in 2009 (Providence), FLUXspace in 2010 (Philadelphia), & The Green Lantern Gallery in 2010 (Chicago Ave., Chicago). The Philadelphia show was covered here.

The Chicago Effect: Redefining the Middle is an exhibition and public program that engages artists and practitioners in considering conditions of the middle—both conceptual and concrete. Artwork on view in The Chicago Effect will explore permeable boundaries, liminal spaces, and in-betweens, identifying and asserting the necessity of the middle as a fertile improvisational space that becomes a creative engine, and raising questions about the value of a middle-man, a middle class, a moderate political position, and even the middle ground between formal and material states. Using the Art Center as a model for how an arts institution can occupy the space of the middle to foster intercommunity connectivity and spur creative production, public programming and a printed catalogue will accompany the exhibition to offer analyses of how mid-sized organizations can serve and engage audiences. Co-curated by Director of Exhibitions & Residency Programs Allison Peters Quinn, Residency & Special Projects Manager Megha Ralapati, and New York-based guest curator Christopher K. Ho, the exhibition encourages movement away from the poles. The curators frame the position of the middle as an essential condition of the creative process, selecting artwork that exemplifies this idea.

Isolated Fiction Artist Biographies

Born in Missoula, MT in 1976, Amanda Browder received an MFA/MA from the University of Wisconsin at Madison and taught at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She currently lives and works in Brooklyn, New York producing large-scale fabric installations for building exteriors and other public sites. She has shown on three continents including at the Nuit Blanche Public Art Festival/LEITMOTIF in Toronto; FAB Fest, New York City; The Dumbo ArtsFestival, Brooklyn; Mobinale, Prague; Allegra LaViola Gallery, NYC; Nakaochiai Gallery, Tokyo; White Columns, NYC; No Longer Empty, Brooklyn. Photos and reviews have appeared in print media from the New York Times to Fibers Magazine and she is a founder of, and can be heard on, the art podcast, www.badatsports.com. The artist website is www.amandabrowder.com

Nick Butcher (b. 1980, Dyersburg, TN) is an artist and musician living in Chicago, Illinois. He is currently an MFA candidate at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in Printmedia. Butcher’s work, though diverse, has centered around printmaking since 2001. He received his BFA form Middle Tennessee State University under the guidance of printmaker Christie Nuell in 2002. A Chicago resident since 2003, Butcher has worked under local printmaker Jay Ryan, as well as established Sonnenzimmer, a collaborative art practice, print and design studio with his wife, Nadine Nakanishi. Their collaborative work has been shown in the United States, Europe, and China with recent exhibits at the Art Institute of Chicago, the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, the Minneapolis College of Art and Design.

Born in Manila, Philippines, Maria Dumlao is an interdisciplinary artist whose work has been exhibited and screened Art in General, Momenta Art Gallery, and Schroeder Romero Gallery in NYC, The Contemporary Museum in Hawaii and internationally. She’s had residencies at Experimental Television Center in Owego, NY, and at free103point9′s Wave Farm in Acra, NY. Her collaborative work with Brainstormers has appeared at Brooklyn Museum of Art and Bronx Museum of Art (a collaboration with Guerilla Girls) and received funding from The Puffin Foundation. She received a BA in Studio Art and Art History at Rutgers College in New Brunswick, NJ and an MFA in Studio Art at Hunter College-CUNY in New York, NY. She is currently an Assistant Professor at Bucks County Community College in Newtown, PA. Since moving to Philadelphia in 2010, she’s been involved with Little Berlin and Vox Populi.

Jason Dunda is a Canadian painter currently living in Chicago. Trained as an oil painter at York University in Toronto (BFA) and The School of the Art Institute of Chicago (MFA),  he is currently working on a suite of gouache paintings called “The Most Beautiful Things in the World” in which he depicts images of beautifully ramshackle instruments of authority. Outside the studio, he is an Adjunct Assistant Professor at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago where he teaches studio and seminar classes in the Contemporary Practices and Arts Administration and Policy departments. Recent projects include “Euphemize” at Slow in Chicago; “Sensible” at Katharine Mulherin  Contemporary Art Projects in Toronto; “Isolated Fictions” at Fluxspace in Philadelphia, Green Lantern in Chicago, and AS220 in Providence; “no substantial advantage to mankind” at Kasia Kay, as well as the Hyde Park Art Center in Chicago, Cain Schulte Gallery in San Francisco, James Baird Gallery in St. John’s, the Contemporary Arts Museum in Houston, the Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston, and the Wexner Center in Columbus. International exhibits include the Heine-Onstad Art Centre in Oslo, the Kuwait Art Foundation in Kuwait City, and  SÍM Gallery in Reykjavik. His work is represented in the collections of Todd Oldham, the Agnes Etherington Art Centre and the Doris McCarthy Gallery at the University of Toronto. Recent residencies include the Corporation of Yaddo, the Atlantic Center for the Arts, and a four-month research and production residency at the Cité Internationale des Arts in Paris.

Rebecca Mir Grady is a Chicago based artist, by way of Alaska and Maine. When she was too little to walk, she was pulled around on a sled by a german shepherd called Namer. Her work is primarily concerned with the perplexing character of interactions with nature. Grady received her MFA from the University of Illinois at Chicago and a BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She has exhibited widely around the US and Internationally, at the University of Chicago, Columbia College, Carthage College, Illinois State University, Pittsburgh Center for the Arts and Prosjecktrom Normanns, among others. Her work can be found online at www.sheisrestless.com.

Nadine Nakanishi (b. 1976, Los Angeles, CA) is a Swiss-American artist based in Chicago, Illinois. Nakanishi works across several disciplines including printmaking, painting, weaving, and graphic design. She studied typography at the Gestalterische Berufsschule in Zürich, Switzerland. In 2006, she established Sonnenzimmer, a collaborative art practice, print and design studio with her husband, Nick Butcher. Her individual work has been shown in Switzerland, while her collaborative work with Sonnenzimmer has been shown in the United States, Europe, and China with recent exhibits at the Art Institute of Chicago, the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, the Minneapolis College of Art and Design.

Carmen Price’s work creates new relationships between familiar visual elements. His celebratory drawings use personal symbolism and a strong faith in the accidental to form occasionally narrative and often confusing scenes. Originally from Kansas City, Price currently lives and works in Chicago.

Steve Ruiz is an artist and writer from Chicago, having earned his MFA at University of Chicago in 2013. In addition to writing for Daily Serving and Bad at Sports, he manages the visual art calendar website, The Visualist.

Hui-min Tsen’s work explores the act of exploration itself with an emphasis on the individual’s everyday relationship with place, wonder, and the unknown. Through a series of projects ranging from boat-building to walking tours, she has sought to cross the distance between here and over there by reaching for the myth and mystery present in our everyday landscape. Selected exhibitions and publications include the Hyde Park Art Center, Gallery 400, MDW Fair, and Proximity Magazine. Screenings and performances include work with Public Culture Lecture Series, the Macedonian Museum of Contemporary Art and Neighborhood Public Radio’s This American Life at The Whitney Biennial 2008.  Her first book, The Pedway of Today, was published through Green Lantern Press in 2013. She received a BFA from Tisch School of the Arts, and an MFA in photography from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and currently teaches photography and video in Chicago.

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Ghost Nature

Ghost Nature was featured in issue 7 of the Journal for Artistic Research.

La Box, ENSA, Bourges: January – April, 2014.

Gallery 400, Chicago: January 17 – March 1, 2014.

Artists: Sebastian Alvarez, Art Orienté objet (Marion Laval-Jeantet and Benoît Mangin), Jeremy Bolen, Irina Botea, Agnes Meyer-Brandis, Robert Burnier, Marcus Coates, Assaf Evron, Carrie Gundersdorf, Institute of Critical Zoologists, Jenny Kendler, Devin King, Stephen Lapthisophon, Milan Metthey, Rebecca Mir, Heidi Norton, Akosua Adoma Owusu, Tessa Siddle, and Xaviera Simmons.

The Northwest Passage—an historic golden fleece of shipping routes—has opened up in the Arctic, and scientists continue to predict dramatic rising seas. Bee populations have fallen rapidly, raising questions about food production. Mice grow human ears on their backs in laboratories and rabbits glow in the dark. In this new age of ecological awareness, “Nature” as a Romantic ideal—a pristine mountainside beyond the scope of human influence—is but a dithering spirit. Rather than succumbing to the pang of this loss, Ghost Nature exposes the limits of human perspective in the emergent landscape that remains: a slippery network of sometimes monstrous creatures, plants, and technological advances.

An affiliated catalogue of the same name with written contributions by Timothy Morton, Graham Harman, Laurie Palmer, Caroline Picard, João Florêncio, Nettrice Gaskins, and Jamila Woods was co-published by La Box & The Green Lantern Press.

In France, Ghost Nature took place as a two part exhibition in January and March. Both iterations were covered by the local Bourges paper, Le Berryhere and here. It was listed in depth on AAAR.Fr, and reviewed by Paris Art who wrote, “By reflecting, criticizing, blurring and moving the boundaries between what is human and what is not, the material presented here emphasizes the fluidity of the enigmatic natural landscape we inhabit” / “En reflétant, critiquant, estompant et bouleversant les frontières entre ce qui est humain et ce qui ne l’est pas, les plasticiens présentés ici soulignent l’énigmatique fluidité du paysage naturel que nous habitons.”

In Chicago, Ghost Nature was sited as one of Hyperallergic’s top 10 shows to see in Chicago during the polar vortex winter, made the top 20 and top 18 list of shows to see in the Chicago Magazine in January and February respectively, and was listed on the CAA website as a recommended exhibit.

It was also reviewed in the Turkish magazine, Art Unlimited.

Here is an interview with The Institute of Critical Zoologists; another with Marion Leval Jeantet of Art Orienté objet; an interview with Xaviera Simmons; and a more recent interview with Robert Burnier.

LA BOX, ENSA: Installation Images

Akosua Adoma Owusu. " Anance," 2013, dual video projection, 1.37 min. Installation view, La Box, ENSA, 2014.

Akosua Adoma Owusu. ” Anance,” 2013, dual video projection, 1.37 min. Installation view, La Box, ENSA, 2014.

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Ghost Nature, La Box, 2014. Installation view. “Picturesque,” Irina Botea, 2013. Video still.

Ghost Nature, La Box, Bourges, 2014. Installation view.

Ghost Nature, La Box, Bourges, 2014. Installation view.

Ghost Nature, La Box, Bourges, 2014. Installation View.

Ghost Nature, La Box, Bourges, 2014. Installation View.

GALLERY 400 : Installation Images

Ghost Nature, Gallery 400, Chicago, 2014 (installation view). Left: Heidi Norton, Anaphase Mutated, 2014, glass, resin, plants, paint, wood, 61 1/2 x 52 in. Right: Akosua Adoma Owusu, Anancy, 2012, video and slides, 2:00 min.

Ghost Nature, Gallery 400, Chicago, 2014 (installation view). Left: Heidi Norton, Anaphase Mutated, 2014, glass, resin, plants, paint, wood, 61 1/2 x 52 in. Right: Akosua Adoma Owusu, Anancy, 2012, video and slides, 2:00 min.

Ghost Nature, Gallery 400, Chicago, 2014 (installation view). Sebastian Alvarez, The Chronosophical Society, Transection 01, 2014, digital print on vinyl, 8 x 24 ft.

Ghost Nature, Gallery 400, Chicago, 2014 (installation view). Sebastian Alvarez, The Chronosophical Society, Transection 01, 2014, digital print on vinyl, 8 x 24 ft.

Ghost Nature, Gallery 400, Chicago, 2014, Installation view.

Ghost Nature, Gallery 400, Chicago, 2014, Installation view.

Ghost Nature, Gallery 400, Chicago, 2014 (installation view). Left: Jenny Kendler, Camouflage V (Ultra-deflector for endangered Bird of Paradise), 2013, vintage porcelain bird, glue, paperclay, acrylic, gold leaf, 10 x 6 x 6 in. Center: Assaf Evron, Untitled, (sRGB 1996), 2012, MDF and epoxy, 32 x 35 x 18 in. Right: Carrie Gundersdorf, Four Sections of Saturn’s Rings, 2013, colored pencil and watercolor on paper, 40 x 60 in.

Ghost Nature, Gallery 400, Chicago, 2014 (installation view). Left: Jenny Kendler, Camouflage V (Ultra-deflector for endangered Bird of Paradise), 2013, vintage porcelain bird, glue, paperclay, acrylic, gold leaf, 10 x 6 x 6 in. Center: Assaf Evron, Untitled, (sRGB 1996), 2012, MDF and epoxy, 32 x 35 x 18 in. Right: Carrie Gundersdorf, Four Sections of Saturn’s Rings, 2013, colored pencil and watercolor on paper, 40 x 60 in.

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Field Static

A Group Show About the Object

June 2nd – June 13th, 2012 at the Co-Prosperity Sphere .:. 3219 South Morgan Street  Chicago, IL 60608

Featuring the work of Ellen Rothenberg, Mark Booth, Stephen Lapthisophon, Heather Mekkelson, Christian Kuras and Duncan MacKenzie, Carrie Gundersdorf, Justin Cabrillos, and Rebecca Mir.

Field Static examines the possibilities of objects as they engage with each other and thereby embody a network, or constellation of points. What begins to emerge is an ecology that blurs the lines between life forms and inanimate material bodies. In Field Static curators Caroline Picard and Devin King created an opportunity in which relations between objects might be highlighted such that the field created via the installation of artwork would accent one’s material engagement. Each object within the Co-Prosperity Sphere becomes focal point and periphery alike, suggesting both solitary histories and the peculiar synthesis of matter common to all things. Field Static rejects or, at least, torques art’s historically anthropocentric position — the poem is written by a human, the portrait is painted of a human — in favor of a more egalitarian engagement with objects. How are objects, human and non-human digested and reborn by the realization and decay of magnetisms? Part celebration, part lament for the passing of a moment, these artists have been invited to examine pan-psychic networks of affect and influence.

Field Static will open with an accompanying catalogue featuring essays by João Florêncio, Lin Hixson, Robert Jackson, Lily Robert-Foley, Peter O’Leary, Devin King & Caroline Picard.

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Additional programming includes a public seminar, Location/Location on Wednesday the 6th of June from 6-9 pm, during which 5 panelists will give 10-15 minute presentations followed by a longform discussion. This symposium was organized and will be moderated by Lily Robert-Foley. Panelists include Laura Goldstein, Gene Tanta, T. Siddle, AD Jameson and Meredith Kooi.

SYMPOSIUM: Location/Location

The English word location, /ləʊˈkeɪʃn/, translated into French gives endroit, lieu,
où se trouve [qqchose].  On the other hand, the french word location /lɔkasjɔ̃/, translated into English gives, renting, renting out, or rent (as in rent money), hire, reservation, or booking.  We call this homonymic condition—of looking the same but sounding and meaning differently—a faux ami, or false friend.

In what has now become the grand tradition of a poetic approach that seeks to treat

from the mistranslation of location/location:  of location as renting, or as renting as location; of endroit as location, of location as endroit.  To rent is the appropriation of something its user does not own, it’s the experience of a secondary usage, of a mistranslation of objects or space.  Location has many meanings, but may be summarily delimited as a kind of meeting place:  of subject and object, of objects and subjects with each other.  It is the place where the metaphysics of self and other rub together like thumb and index in the analogon for tender. This seminar is to be held at the Co-Prosperity Sphere in the context of a show curated by Caroline Picard and Devin King, Field Static, which reflects upon objects in space, and the way they relate to each other.  In this sense it likewise seeks to turn away from a self centered discourse of the subject towards a reflection on objects themselves. Proposals for articipation must therefore maintain a connection to a reflection on the interrelatedness of objects.  What is an object, and how does it mean?   What use or contextualization of an object be seen as a kind of translation?  At what point does an immaterial phenomenon become object?  Is there such a thing as object performance?   Do objects have consciousness (à la C.S. Peirce)?

BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

ARTISTS:

MARK BOOTH is an interdisciplinary artist, sound artist, and writer.  He received a BFA from the Rhode Island School of Design and an MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.  Exhibitions and projects include The Sea is Represented by an Irregular Shape at Devening Projects and Editions Chicago, God is Represented by the Sea, Adds Donna Gallery Chicago, Nothing to do with wizards, O’Connor Gallery, Domincan University, River Forest, IL.,pierecednightstarvoice at Schalter Gallery, Berlin, Germany, The Stinging Tentacles Of Anxiety That Constrict The Heart Are Healed By The Light Of An Inner Sun, Gahlberg Gallery, College of DuPage, Glen Ellyn, IL., Spanish Still Life (or a large list of merged animals), Hyde Park Art Center, Chicago, IL., Endless (Perverted by Language/Delay 1968), UBS 12×12, Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, IL.. Collaborative projects include the exhibition (6) The Speed of the Word Sound/The Sound of the Word Speed, at Light Projects, Northcote, Victoria, Australia, with Micheal Graeve, the performance Quiet (A disruptive fog (or a hogshead full of vapor called memory) in Chicago, Illinois with Karen Christopher and John Sisson, and BERGBASTARDS with Volker Saul. He has performed and exhibited in the United States, Scandinavia, Australia, and Germany. Booth is an assistant professor at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

JUSTIN CABRILLOS is a choreographer, writer, and performance artist based in Chicago. Cabrillos received his MFA in writing from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. He was a summer fellow at Ox-Bow School of Art, an IN>TIME Incubation Series artist-in-residence at the Chicago Cultural Center, and a 2011 LinkUP Artist at Links Hall. He was a recipient of a Greenhouse grant from the Chicago Dancemaker’s Forum and has collaborated with Every house has a door.

CARRIE GUNDERSDORF Carrie Gundersdorf is a Chicago based artist.  Solo exhibitions include the Museum of Contemporary Art (Chicago), Julius Caesar (Chicago), Shane Campbell Gallery (Chicago), and Gahlberg Gallery, College of Dupage, (Glen Ellyn, IL).  She has also exhibited in group shows at Loyola Museum of Art (Chicago), Regina Rex (Brooklyn), Marc Foxx Gallery (Los Angeles), Proof Gallery (Boston), Gallery 400, University of Illinois (Chicago), Tony Wight Gallery (Chicago) and SWINGR (Vienna), among others.  Her work has been discussed in Art Review, Chicago Tribune, Artforum.com, Artnet, Bad at Sports, Art on Paper, and Time Out Chicago.  Gundersdorf is the recipient of the Artadia Award and the Bingham Fellowship.

CHRISTIAN KURAS lives in the post-rural English countryside. His art practice involves painting, sculpture, writing and photography. He usually works in collaboration with other artists, which he finds is the perfect platform for the exploration of the confusions and conflicts inherent to individual personhood and its relationship to all forms of social entanglement. His work has been shown and published across Canada, the United States and Europe. He splits his time between his art practice and co-directing a successful design agency called Exploded View. He has been collaborating with Duncan MacKenzie since 2003.

STEPHEN LAPTHISOPHON is an American artist and educator working in the field of conceptual art, critical theory, and disability studies. Lapthisophon received his MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 1979. His early work combined poetry, performance, sound art, and visual arts with postmodern philosophical concerns. He was also influenced by the legacy of the Situationists, who sought to make everyday life a focus of artistic activity. Lapthisophon has taught at Columbia College in Chicago, the School of the Art Institute, and the University of Texas at Dallas. He currently teaches art and art history at The University of Texas at Arlington.

DUNCAN MACKENZIE is an Artist, Pundit, Educator and a Founding Member/Producer of Bad at Sports. (badatsports.com) His works have appeared in galleries all over the world including Canada, Australia, The United States of America, New Zealand, Estonia and England. His work has been discussed in Flash Art, Art Forum, the New York Times, Time Out and many other venues. He is the author of over 250 interviews and has worked with such people as Rodney Graham, Kerry James Marshall, Francesco Bonami, Luc Tuymans, James Elkins, Julie Ault, Carol Becker, James Rondeau, Jeff Wall, and Gavin Turk. He currently enjoys a posting as an Assistant Professor in Art + Design at Columbia College Chicago.

HEATHER MEKKELSON lives in Chicago where she earned degrees from the University of Illinois at Chicago and The School of The Art Institute of Chicago. Her work has been seen in solo shows at threewalls (Chicago), Old Gold (Chicago), and STANDARD (Chicago) as well as in group shows at The Museum of Contemporary Photography (Chicago), The Figge Art Museum (Davenport, IA), Raid Projects (L.A.), and Vox Populi (Philadelphia, PA). She has had her work featured in Art Journal and Broadsheet (The Contemporary Art Center of South Australia) and in the essay collection The Migrant’s Time: Rethinking Art History and Diaspora published by Yale University Press and the Clark Institute.

REBECCA MIR is a Chicago based artist, by way of Alaska and Maine. When she was too little to walk, she was pulled around on a sled by a German shepherd called Namer. Her work is primarily concerned with the perplexing character of interactions with nature. Mir received her MFA from the University of Illinois at Chicago and has exhibited around the country. Issue #3 of her zine SHE IS RESTLESS, focused on earthly phenomenon, was just released at Chicago Zine Fest 2012. Look for more of her work at rebeccamir.com.

ELLEN ROTHENBERG’S work is concerned with the politics of everyday life and the formation of communities through collaborative practices.  Her installations and public projects often employ the iconography of social movements and their residual documents to interrogate contemporary political engagement and social dialogue. In her projects, we find familiar materials such as newspapers, protest placards, and public signage… often reformed, refashioned, and rewritten; drawing our attention to the assumptions that animate the world around us.  Her work has been presented in the US and Europe at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; the National Museum of Contemporary Art, Bucharest; the Royal Festival Hall, London; the Institute of Contemporary Art and Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; the Portland Museum of Art, Maine; the Contemporary Jewish Museum, San Francisco; and the Neues Museum Weserburg, Bremen.  Recent exhibitions include Experimental Geography, curated by Nato Thompson and ICI, NYC.  Rothenberg is currently engaged in a cultural exchange project with the Brukenthal National Museum and the Astra National Museum Complex, Sibiu, Romania. Rothenberg continues to work as a co-organizer of the Chicago Torture Justice Memorial Project.

 

CATALOGUE AUTHORS:

JOÃO FLORÊNCIO is a Portuguese scholar based in London and researching on  Contemporary European Philosophy and Performance Studies. His academic background is Musicology with optional courses in Film Studies (B.A., Lisbon and Venice), and Media Arts Philosophy (M.A., Greenwich). He is also an associated researcher of ‘Performance Matters’ (www.thisisperformancematters.co.uk) and a Visiting Tutor in Visual Cultures at Goldsmiths, University of London, where he leads the “Modernities” seminar and laboratory series, both part of the BA History of Art.

LILY ROBERT-FOLEY was born in San Francisco in 1984. She writes poetic-criticism (sometimes bilingual), does language collage, (The North Georgia Gazette, Green Lantern Press, 2009; “m” forthcoming from Corrupt Press, 2012), visual and sound poetry, and performance. She also invents reading and writing machines based on constraints (Graphemachines forthcoming from Atelier de l’Agneau, 2012). She is pursuing a doctorate in Comparative Literature at the University of Paris 8 where she is writing a thesis on self-translation. She currently teaches anglophone literature (also at Paris 8).

LIN HIXSON co-founded Goat Island in 1987, and Every house has a door in 2008. She is full Professor of Performance at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and received an honorary doctorate from Dartington College in 2007. Goat Island created nine performance works and toured extensively in the US, England, Scotland, Wales, Belgium, Switzerland, Croatia, Germany, and Canada. Her writing on directing and performance has been published in the journals P-Form, TDR, Frakcija, Performance Research, Women and Performance, andWhitewalls; and included in the anthologies Small Acts of Repair – Performance, Ecology, and Goat Island, Live Art and Performance, Theatre in Crisis?, and the textbook Place and Placelessness in Performance. Hixson has directed two films, Daynightly They re-school you The Bears-Polka and It’s Aching Like Birds, in collaboration with the artist Lucy Cash and Goat Island.

ROBERT JACKSON is an MPhil/PhD student at the University of Plymouth, an artist and a software developer in the UK. Entitled “Algorithm, Contingency and the Non-Human: Undecidability in Computational Art,” his research incorporates Computational Algorithmic Artworks, Art Formalism and Speculative Realist Philosophy, identifying an occluded history of computer art which operates as configurable units of necessity rather than networked systems of contingency. Robert is also an associate editor of the independent philosophical journal Speculations.

DEVIN KING is a writer, musician, and teacher working in Chicago. His work is primarily concerned with the interiority of the audience member and connects formal ideas from opera, modernism, minimalism, and pop music to theories of myth, the object, and the ghost. He received an MFA from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago and currently teaches in the Liberal Arts department. He curates performances, readings, lectures, and movies at The (New) Corpse. His long poem, CLOPS, is out from the Green Lantern Press where he is now an Associate Editor. A new chapbook, The Resonant Space, is out from Holon Press. His writing on music can be found at Make Magazine and The Boston Phoenix. He is part of the mighty Lady Rollins, a collaborative performance group with Jess Speer, Peter Speer, and Caroline Picard.

PETER O’LEARY Vocations to poetry and religion have committed Peter O’Leary to the pursuit of what St. Bonaventure named an itinerarium mentis in deum, or the journey of the mind to God, with particular attention devoted to the mystagogical-initiatic and the mytho-poetical. Luminous Epinoia, published by the Cultural Society, is his most recent book. He lives in Berwyn, Illinois and teaches at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and for the Committee on Creative Writing at the University of Chicago.

CAROLINE PICARD is a Chicago-based artist, writer and curator. Integrating mediums of performance, text and visual ephemera as creative — and sometimes collaborative — platforms she investigates the figure in relation to systems of power. Her work has been exhibited around the United States, Asia and Romania and was discussed inPoets & Writers Magazine, Time Out Chicago, New City, Art21, Artforum.com, html giant and Punk Planet. In 2005, she founded the Green Lantern Press and has since released 22 slow-media titles ranging. She writes regularly for thebadatsports and Art21 blogs, as well as Art ltd. and Proximity Magazines. Her first collection of short stories, Psycho Dream Factory, was published in 2011 by Holon Press. New work is forthcoming with Seven Stories Press, Anobium, and The Coming Envelope (Bookthug). She also performs regularly in collaboration as Lady Rollins.

SEMINAR PANELISTS:

LAURA GOLDSTEIN’s poetry and essays can be found in American Letters and Commentary, MAKE, jacket2, EAOGH, Requited, Little Red Leaves, and How2. Her chapbook Let Her came out from Dancing Girl Press in January 2012 and her newest chapbook, Inventory, will be released by Sona Books in June 2012. She currently co-curates the Red Rover reading series with Jennifer Karmin and teaches Writing and Literature at Loyola University.

A D JAMESON is the author of two books: the prose collection Amazing Adult Fantasy (Mutable Sound, 2011), in which he tries to come to terms with having been raised on ’80s
pop culture, and the novel Giant Slugs (Lawrence and Gibson, 2011), an absurdist retelling of the Epic of Gilgamesh. He has taught classes at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Lake Forest College, DePaul University, Facets Multimedia, and StoryStudio Chicago. He is also the nonfiction / reviews editor of the online journal Requited. He recently started the PhD program in Creative Writing at the University of Illinois at Chicago, and contributing to HTMLGIANT.

MEREDITH KOOI is a doctoral student in the Graduate Institute of Liberal Arts and certificate student in Comparative Literature at Emory University where she organizes the salon series SENSORIUM for the Visual Scholarship Initiative. She received her MA in Visual and Critical Studies from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and her BA in Environmental Studies from Denison University. She has been published in the DVD journalASPECT: The Chronicle of New Media Art and has a forthcoming essay in The Contemporary Visual Studies Readeredited by James Elkins (Routledge). Her visual and performance work has been shown in galleries and medical venues both nationally and internationally. Her dissertation work centers on the aesthetics of the autoimmune condition as a physiological phenomenon and structuring logic of selfhood, the social, and politics. She has a six-year-old mutt named Belle who was found wandering the Ohio countryside. Belle enjoys walking, chewing on bones, eating bananas, and generally being awesome.

TESSA SIDDLE is a film/video maker, installation/performance artist, and founding curator of the MisALT Screening Series in San Francisco. She received an MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 2010 and has since dedicated her work to questioning conventional models of gender and other binary social constructions such as Nature/Culture, Animal/Human, Autobiography/ Fiction, Physical/Mental, and Intellectual/Emotional.

GENE TANTA was born in Timisoara, Romania and lived there until immigrated to the United States. Since then, he has lived in DeKalb, Iowa City, New York, Oaxaca City, Iasi, Milwaukee, and Chicago. He is a poet, visual artist, and translator of contemporary Romanian poetry. His first poetry book is called Unusual Woods (BlazeVOX, 2010). His second poetry book is called Pastoral Emergency. Tanta earned his MFA in Poetry from the Iowa’s Writers’ Workshop in 2000 and his PhD in English from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee in 2009 with literary specialization in twentieth-century American poetry and the European avant-garde. His poems, translations, and artwork work may be found in journals such as: EPOCH, Ploughshares, Circumference Magazine, Cream City Review, Exquisite Corpse, Watchword, Columbia Poetry Review, The Laurel Review, and Drunken Boat. Tanta has had two collaborative poems with Reginald Shepherd anthologized in Saints of Hysteria: A Half-Century of Collaborative American Poetry. Most recently, he has chaired a panel at the 2010 AWP titled, Immigrant Poetry: Aesthetics of Displacement. Currently, he is teaching creative writing while working on a collection of short prose.