Zhou Sivan + Anna Martine Whitehead

On Friday March 31st at 7pm, Zhou Sivan & Anna Martine Whitehead  will give readings. Doors open at 6:30 pm. This event is free.

Zhou Sivan is the pen name of Nic Wong, a Malaysian writer based in Chicago. The Chinese characters of his pen name, 荮细玩, can mean “savoring a bundle of grass” or “straw-wrapped contemplation.” His brief collection of sonnets, Zero Copula (Delete Press, 2015), considers poetic and political questions of alignment and the constructedness of the breath-line. Sea Hypocrisy (DoubleCross Press and Projective Industries, 2016) is a chapbook-length lyric and satiric piece around acts of bearing witness to the refugee crisis in Southeast Asia. His recent work can be found in Lana TurnerChicago ReviewAlmost Island, and Asymptote. He is finishing a comparative literature dissertation on the genealogies of Cold War Mahua, or Malaysian Chinese, literary history.

Anna Martine Whitehead makes moves for an uncertain planet. They have shown work across North America and have contributed significantly to projects by Jefferson Pinder, taisha paggett, Every house has a door, Keith Hennessy, and Julien Prévieux. Martine has written about Black and queer performance practices for an array outlets including C Magazine, Art Practical, and, most recently Meanings and Makings of Queer Dance. Their first chapbook TREASURE | My Black Rupture debuted this past Spring. Find out more at annamartine.com.

CM Burroughs, Phillip B. Williams, + Jacob Victorine

On Saturday March 11th at 7pm, CM Burroughs, Phillip B. Williams, and Jacob Victorine will give readings. Doors open at 6:30 pm. This event is free.

CM Burroughs is Assistant Professor of Poetry at Columbia College Chicago. Her first book is The Vital System, published by Tupelo Press in 2012. Burroughs has been awarded fellowships and grants from Yaddo, the MacDowell Colony, Djerassi Foundation, Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, Cave Canem Foundation, Callaloo Writers Workshop, and the University of Pittsburgh. She has received commissions from the Studio Museum of Harlem and the Warhol Museum to create poetry in response to art installations. Her poetry has appeared in journals including Callaloo, jubilat, Ploughshares, VOLT, Bat City ReviewBest American Experimental Writing (2016,) and Volta. Burroughs is a graduate of Sweet Briar College, and she earned her MFA from the University of Pittsburgh.

Phillip B. Williams is the author of Thief in the Interior, a finalist for an NAACP Image Award and Kate Tufts Discovery Award. He received a 2013 Ruth Lilly Fellowship and is the co-editor in chief of the online journal Vinyl. He is currently visiting professor in English at Bennington College.

Jacob Victorine was born and raised in New York City. He earned his MFA in Poetry from Columbia College Chicago, where he is a Part-time Instructor in the Creative Writing Department. His poems appear in places such as Columbia Poetry Review, Vinyl Poetry, Matter, DIALOGIST, Phantom Books, and PANK, which nominated him for a Pushcart Prize in 2013. His first book, FLAMMABLE MATTER, was published by Elixir Press in 2016 and his second manuscript, Dear Anne, Dear Sarah, Dear Melita was a semifinalist for the 2016 Fordham University Press POL Prizes.

 

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Printed Matter's LA Art Book Fair 2017

Preview: Thursday, February 23, 6–9 pm
Friday February 24, 1pm-7pm
Saturday February 25, 11am-7pm
Sunday February 26, 11am-6pm

The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA
152 North Central Avenue
Los Angeles, CA 90012

The Green Lantern Press is off to LA this Thursday to participate in Printed Matter’s LA Book Fair 2017. Find us alongside a brilliant Chicago-based publisher, Soberscove. See the full list of additional exhibitors here.

Printed Matter presents the fifth annual LA Art Book Fair, from February 23 – 26, 2017, at The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA. Free and open to the public, Printed Matter’s LA Art Book Fair is a unique event for artists’ books, art catalogs, monographs, periodicals, and zines presented by over 300 international presses, booksellers, antiquarians, artists, and independent publishers. Printed Matter’s LA Art Book Fair 2016 saw over 35,000 visitors over the course of three and a half days. Printed Matter’s LA ART BOOK FAIR is the companion fair to Printed Matter’s NY ART BOOK FAIR, held every fall in New York. In September 2016, over 39,000 artists, book buyers, collectors, dealers, curators, independent publishers, and enthusiasts attended Printed Matter’s NY ART BOOK FAIR. The fifth annual LA Contemporary Artists’ Books Conference will feature a keynote address by AA BRONSON, titled MY LIFE IN BOOKS. More information is available here.

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Bojana Cvejić

Social Choreography and Performing the Self

On Monday, Jan 23 at 7pm, Bojana Cvejić will present a lecture at Sector 2337. This event is co-organized with The Goethe Institut.

Bojana Cvejić (born in Belgrade/Serbia) is a performance theorist and performance maker based in Brussels. She is a co-founding member of TkH editorial collective (http://www.tkh-generator.net) with whom she has realized many projects and publications. Cvejić received her PhD in philosophy from the Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy, London and MA and BA degrees in musicology and aesthetics from the Faculty of Music, University of the Arts, Belgrade.

Her latest books are Choreographing Problems: Expressive Concepts in European Contemporary Dance and Performance (Palgrave, Basingstoke 2015), Drumming & Rain: A Choreographer’s Score, co-written with A.T.De Keersmaeker (Mercator, Brussels, 2014), Parallel Slalom: Lexicon of Nonaligned Poetics, co-edited with G. S. Pristaš (TkH/CDU, Belgrade/Zagreb, 2013) and Public Sphere by Performance, co-written with A. Vujanović (b_books, Berlin, 2012). She has been (co-)author, dramaturge or performer in many dance and theater performances since 1996, with a.o. Jan Ritsema, Xavier Le Roy, Eszter Salamon, Mette Ingvartsen, and Christine De Smedt.

In 2013, Cvejić curated the exhibition Danse-Guerre at Musée de la danse, Rennes (in collaboration with C. Costinas) in the frame of which she made videos two videos “… in a non-wimpy way” (with Steve Paxton) and “Yvonne Rainer’s WAR” (co-authored with L. Laberenz).  In 2014, she devised a choreography and lecture program titled Spatial Confessions for Tate Modern’s Turbine Hall.

Cvejić teaches at various dance and performance programs in Europe, she is Associate Professor of Dance Theory at the Oslo National Academy of Arts and Professor of Philosophy of Art at Faculty for Media and Communication, University Singidunum in Belgrade. Her current research focuses on social choreography, technologies and performances of the self, and time and rhythm in performance poetics and Post-Fordist modes of production.

 

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We Just Don't Know - Finding Ways to Loosen Certainties

A Seminar with Kate McIntosh

On January 17, 2017 from 6-9PM at Sector 2337 (2337 N Milwaukee Ave., Chicago IL 60647)

At this seminar, the group is offered an experiment in thinking. Our questions circle around the apparent clash between the logic of scientific thinking and the imagination of the arts — and how these might disturb and stimulate each other. Both science and art rely heavily on metaphor to concretize abstract ideas — and these metaphors become necessary invitations to re-examine our understanding of reality. The way we name things, and our freedom to do so, is key to our perception of the world. Therefore to engage in any major shift of world-view (or to stimulate one), it is essential that we are skilled and flexible in our use of metaphor — in our naming of things…

How can an artistic thought process be disturbing and useful for our factual, inventive and scientific ideas? What is a healthy suspicion of the poverty of metaphors? What happens when we attempt to ‘show’ what we ‘know’?

In this seminar Kate McIntosh gives an individual and playful provocation on these questions. The event begins with a performance lecture, and concludes with an investigative experiment-game for the participants.

Concept, text and delivery: Kate McIntosh

Originally commissioned by PACT Zollverein (DE) for the ‘Explorationen 10’ conference. This event is co-produced with The Goethe-Institut.

 

Kate McIntosh is an artist working across the boundaries of performance, theatre, video and installation. From New Zealand and originally trained in dance, she has performed internationally since 1995 – appearing in the work of directors such as Wendy Houstoun (UK), Meryl Tankard Australian Dance Theatre,  Cie Michèle Anne de Mey (Belgium), Random Scream (Belgium), Simone Aughterlony (NZ/Switzerland) and Tim Etchells (UK).

Since 2004 Kate has focused on directing her own work – including the solos All Natural(2004), Loose Promise (2007), and All Ears (2013) and the larger performances Hair From the Throat (2006), Dark Matter (2009) and Untried Untested (2012). Her installation works include De-Placed (2008 with Eva Meyer-Keller), and the participatory installation Worktable(2011). In her own work she has enjoyed collaborations with Tim Etchells, Eva Meyer-Keller, Jo Randerson, Lilia Mestre, Charo Calvo, Diederik Peeters, and many more.

Kate has directed several short videos which have played at festivals and exhibitions the world over. She was a founding member of the Belgian performance collective and punkrock band Poni, and she holds an MRes in Performance and Creative Research from Roehampton University (UK).

 

She is a founding member of SPIN: the artist-run production and research platform based in Brussels.

For further information about her work please see www.spinspin.be gi_logo_vertical_green_srgb

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for_twovocalists / DORA/ANA/GUATAVITA / The Brig

Second Annual Festival of Poets Theater: Night 2

Between December 7th and December 10th Green Lantern Press and Kenning Editions will present a Festival of Poets Theater at Sector 2337 (Dec. 7th, 8th, and the afternoon of the 10th) and Links Hall (Dec. 9th and 10th). The festival features 3-4 events each evening beginning at 7pm and a symposium on Saturday afternoon beginning at 2:00pm.

Passes for the festival are available here.

7:00pm: for_twovocalists by Nathanael Jones w/ Beth McDonald and Neal Markowski

Well, what does the title tell us? for_twovocalists. Let’s begin with the easiest part: “twovocalists.” A compound word of sorts. First a “two,” which unequivocally refers to the “vocalists”—there are two of them. Additionally, “vocalists” can be broken down further into the words vocal (relating to the human voice), and lists (a number of connected items or names). Together, they give us an idea of what to expect. Then there is the “for,” a preposition in this case. Preceding the compound word “twovocalists,” we understand it to mean that something is in support of/supporting the vocalists, or, that it is on behalf of/to the benefit of them. This is comforting. Lastly, we have the underscore. This is the most difficult part. It is a holdover from the typewriter, where it was used to underline sections of a typed text. In the digital age, it has come to find a wide variety of uses (email addresses and ASCII art being among the most popular). The greatest puzzle here then is to ascertain why a typographical element used to give emphasis should be place beneath an empty space.

Nathanael Jones is a Canadian artist/writer based in Chicago, where he is an MFA in writing candidate at SAIC. He has exhibited and performed work in galleries and alternative spaces in Halifax and Chicago, and his writings have been published in the Cerealbowl Collective and Hound. Beth McDonald is a classically trained tuba player gone awry, performing mostly electroacoustic music, free improvisation, and contemporary classical music. She currently performs with Korean Jeans, the Callithumpian Consort, cbs trio, and Seraph Brass, and enjoys working collaboratively with local artists, performers, and composers. As Artistic Director of the August Noise JP concert series, she worked to bring unexpected music to public spaces and to engage her fellow musicians in their community. She works behind the scenes at the Callithumpian Consort (Boston) and Piano Power (Chicago).

Neal Markowski is a composer and multi-instrumentalist based out of Chicago, IL.  He currently plays in a number of groups on a variety of instruments, but mainly on either drum set or guitars or tapes of various sorts.  Neal received his BM in Composition from the New England Conservatory, Boston, MA and his MFA in Studio (within the Sound Department) at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

7:45pm: DORA/ANA/GUATAVITA by Jenni(f)fer Tamayo

DORA/ANA/GUATAVITA is a science-fiction performance text set in the Lake Guatavita sector of the Colombian Andes. In this dystopian future, the text reimagines the children’s cartoon character, Dora the Explorer, as La Dora/da, a descendant of the mythological character, El Dorado, or the “gold one.” In this absurdist melodrama, La Dora/da comes into collusion with Andr0id Jenn1fer Tamay0-0, a cultural terrorist whose first act of state defiance is to conduct an unsanctioned search for the remains of their grandmother, an act considered illegal in this futurescape. Through a series of semi-discrete acts, or “Breaths,” La Dora/da and Andr0id Jenn1fer Tamay0-0’s come into contact with Ida Bauer (Sigmund Freud’s “Dora”), a Chorus of Floras, and ultimately Mamá Chava, the Andr0id’s ancestor.  In this radically hopeful, world-making “hybrid” text (including video, drawing, photography and movement), poet-performer Jennifer Tamayo examines what it means to decolonize our process for (self) discovery and surfacing lost lineages.

Jennif(f)er Tamayo is a queer, latinx, formerly undocumented, Colombian-born educator, artist and essayist. JT is the author of RED MISSED ACHES/RED MISTAKES/READ MISSED ACHES/READ MISTAKES (Switchback, 2011), POEMS ARE THE ONLY REAL BODIES (Bloof Books, 2013) and YOU DA ONE  (2014/16 reprint Noemi Books & Letras Latinas).  Her writing has been featured widely, including Poetry, Best American Experimental Poetry, Angels of the Americlypse: An Anthology of New Latin@ Writing, Bettering American Poetry Anthology and Apogee. She holds fellowships from CantoMundo and the Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics. Currently, JT is a PhD student at University of California-Davis Performance Studies program as a Cota-Robles Fellow.

8:45pm: The Brig, by Kenneth Brown, Living Theatre production filmed by Jonas Mekas

Judith Malina and Julian Beck’s Living Theatre had spent over a decade producing plays written by high modernist poets when along came Kenneth H. Brown’s script The Brig. Their 1963 production of this brutal, minimalist day-in-the-life of a military prison marked a pivot point from poets theater to experimental agit-prop, inspired by the methods of Antonin Artaud’s “theater of cruelty” and the measures of avant-garde verse. New York underground film legend Jonas Mekas’ rarely screened film of the Living Theatre production puts viewers perilously in the midst of the action.

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Cosmological Plants / Corvus corax / To Speak of Future Delights

Second Annual Festival of Poets Theater: Night 1

Between December 7th and December 10th Green Lantern Press and Kenning Editions will present a Festival of Poets Theater at Sector 2337 (Dec. 7th, 8th, and the afternoon of the 10th) and Links Hall (Dec. 9th and 10th). The festival features 3-4 events each evening beginning at 7pm and a symposium on Saturday afternoon beginning at 2:00pm.

Passes for the festival are available here.

6pm: Reception for Early Ticket Buyers

7pm: Cosmological Plants by Michael Pisaro

Cosmological Plants is a dance with music and a poem aligned to the maps of three constellations in the November sky.

Michael Pisaro is a guitarist, composer and a member of the Wandelweiser collective. His music is performed frequently in concerts and festivals around the world. Recordings of his work (solo and collaborative) have been released by Edition Wandelweiser Records, erstwhile records, New World Records, another timbre, slubmusic, Cathnor, Senufo Editions, winds measure, HEM Berlin and on Pisaro’s own imprint, Gravity Wave. Before joining the composition faculty at the California Institute of the Arts, he taught composition and theory at Northwestern University.

7:45pm: Corvus corax by Joseph Clayton Mills

A composition for tape recorders, cassette loops, dictaphone, typewriter, and suitcases, Corvus corax takes as its raw material Patrick Farmer’s prose poem Wild Horses Think of Nothing Else the Sea (SARU 2014).

Joseph Clayton Mills is a musician, artist, and writer who lives and works in Chicago. His text-based paintings, assemblages, and sound installations have been exhibited in Chicago, New York, and Europe and his work has appeared in numerous publications, including The New Yorker. He is the author of the short-story collection Zyxt, and in 2012 published Nabokrossvords, a translation of early Russian crosswords by Vladimir Nabokov. He is an active participant in the improvised and experimental music community in Chicago, where his collaborators have included Adam Sonderberg and Steven Hess (as Haptic), Michael Vallera (as Maar), Noé Cuéllar (as Parital), Sylvain Chaveau, Jason Stein, Michael Pisaro, and Olivia Block, among many others; his recordings have appeared on numerous labels, including Another Timbre, FSS, and Entr’acte. In 2013, in conjunction with Noé Cuéllar, he launched Suppedaneum, a label focused on releasing scores and their realizations.

8:45pm: To Speak of Future Delights

Two images provide a portal to the other side of the world. A lecture delivered in performative typing and voiceless montage.

Kevin B. Lee is a filmmaker and critic based in Chicago. He was named one of the Chicago New City Film 50 in 2013 and 2014. He received an MFA in Film Video New Media and Animation and an MA in Visual Studies from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

New Age Now Fundraiser

2nd Annual Fundraiser for The Green Lantern Press

Fri Dec 2 @ 6 PM – 12 AM
at Sector 2337 (2337 N Milwaukee Ave., Chicago IL 60647)

60s psychedelia meets 19th c. Spiritualism in New Age Now, the Second Annual Fundraiser for The Green Lantern Press. Celebrating its third year at Sector 2337, New Age Now includes a silent auction, a raffle, tarot card readings, poetry readings, and live music, plus conscious cocktails, a curated menu with artist-made appetizers, and additional drinks to suit cosmic needs. Funds raised help The Green Lantern Press support noncommercial art and literary events throughout the year, furthering its role as an artist-centric hub for cultural activities in Chicago.

Ticket info:

New Age Me (Entry + Tote Bag) $30 in advance / $35 at the door
Wheel of Fortune ( Entry + 4 Raffle Tickets + Tote Bag) $40 in advance / $45 at the door
Vibe Tech (Entry + 2 Raffle Tickets + 2 Drinks + Tote Bag) $50 in advance / $55 at the door
 Total Immersion (Entry + GLP Subscription* + 4 Raffle Tickets + 2 Drinks + Tote Bag) $100 
– Moonlighter (Entry After 10PM) $15

Telepath (Send support long distance and get GLP subscription* / Tote Bag / Sector newspaper bundle) $75

Silent Auction (6-10PM) features works by Claire Ashley, Rebecca Beachy, Rami George, Sofia Leiby, Heather Mekkelson, Michael Milano, Aay Preston-Myint, Mitsu Salmon, Edra Soto, Hui-min Tsen, Andrew Yang, and Philip von Zweck. Online bidding has begun here.

Mind / Body Raffle Drawings (6-10PM) include Marbled Mug by Leah Ball, Astrological Reading from Blair Bogin, Essential Acupuncture Initial Session Certificate, a voucher for accupuncture + body work from Five Poin Holistic Health, $50 gift certificate from The Gaslight, Jewelry by Rebecca Mir Grady, Thai Massage with Precious Jennings, Fitness Training package from Michael Moody, Living Botanical from Sprout Home, and a gift certificate to Tula Yoga; plus a selection of comics from Radiator Comics, publications from Kenning Editions, and a gift certificate from The Green Lantern Press.

Transcendental Menu (7-10PM) provided by Brandon Alvendia, Rebecca Mir Grady, Alyssa Martinez, Eric May, Midnight Kitchen Projects, Kathleen Rooney, Edra Soto, and others.

Cosmic Cocktails (6-10PM) courtesy of CH Distillery
+ Sector’s beer/wine menu until (6PM-12AM)

Tarot Card Readings (6-8PM) by Evan Kleekamp

Poetry by Matthew Reed Corey (7pm) + Rodrigo Toscano (8:30PM) , curated by Jose-Luis Moctezuma

Live Music (10PM) curated by Patient Sounds

 

*2016 GLP Subscription package includes: 
– Imperceptibly and Slowly Opening (explores the strange subjectivity of plants with authors like Kristina Chew, Ronald Johnson, Mark Payne, Brooke Holmes, Steven Shaviro, Monica Westin, and others) Winter 2016
– Shadowed! (Simone Forti, Hannah B. Higgins, Caroline Picard, Shawn Michelle Smith, Jeffrey Skoller, and others look at the work of Ellen Rothenberg) Spring 2017
– Institutional Garbage (captures the waste of imaginary and possibly Utopic institutions featuring various authors, artists, and curators culled from its affiliated online exhibition) Summer 2017
– + one book from the GLP catalogue (subscribers’ choice while supplies last) 

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A Rule By Nobody: Publication Release

A Rule By Nobody: Publication Release
November 20, 2016
1-3PM
The fourth and final component of this exhibition series brings together real and imagined bureaucratic forms, collated into a tidy presentation packet. The email chains, tardy slips, applications, contracts and historical documents submitted for the publication respond to and poke fun at the chronic futility of paperwork, the sterility of its language and the discriminatory tactics embedded in the form document.
Artists included in the publication: Brandon Alvendia, Blair Bogin, Rashayla Marie Brown, Alex Chitty, Bethany Collins, Nick Ferreira, Globe Al Chemical Company, Stephen Kwok, Kelly Lloyd, Jesse Malmed, Hương Ngô, Anthony Romero + Josh Rios, Neal Vandenbergh, J Gibran Villalobos and Philip von Zweck
Image Caption:
Email ooo@globe-al.org for more information.

Posthuman Lear and Pseudocidal Camper

Book Release for Posthuman Lear

On Thursday November 17th at 7pm, we will celebrate a new book from Craig Dionne. Dionne will give a lecture and Jake Vogds will give a performance. Doors open at 6:30 pm. This event is free.

Approaching King Lear from an eco-materialist perspective, Posthuman Lear examines how the shift in Shakespeare’s tragedy from court to stormy heath activates a different sense of language as tool-being — from that of participating in the flourish of aristocratic prodigality and circumstance, to that of survival and pondering one’s interdependence with a denuded world. Dionne frames the thematic arc of Shakespeare’s tragedy about the fall of a king as a tableaux of our post-sustainable condition. For Dionne, Lear’s progress on the heath works as a parable of flat ontology.

Craig Dionne is Professor of Literary and Cultural Theory at Eastern Michigan University, where he teaches Shakespeare and Early Modern English Literature. He specializes in Shakespeare and popular culture, early modern literacies and cultural studies. He has co-edited Disciplining English: Alternative Critical Perspectives (with David Shumway, SUNY Press, 2002), Rogues and Early Modern English Culture(with Steve Mentz, University of Michigan Press, 2005), Native Shakespeares: Indigenous Appropriations on a Global Stage (with Parmita Kapadia, Ashgate, 2008), and Bollywood Shakespeares (with Parmita Kapadia, Palgrave, 2014).  He was senior editor of JNT: Journal of Narrative Theory for ten years, and he also co-edited the inaugural issue of postmedieval: a journal of medieval cultural studies (with Eileen Joy, Palgrave, 2010).

Jake Vogds is a multidisciplinary performance artist/singer working in installation, visual media, sculpture, and costume. Through surreal pop-vocal performances, Vogds toys with contemporary notions of camp, trend, and queer consumerism. In June of 2014, he was awarded the Shapiro Center’s EAGER Research Grant for his Queer Mixed Realities Collective from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. He has performed and exhibited at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Defibrillator, Links Hall, Chicago Artist Coalition, Zhou B Arts Center, Three Walls Gallery, and the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts, among others. He received his BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (2014) on a presidential merit scholarship. Currently, he is teaching performance at the Art Academy of Cincinnati while cultivating his performative and visual practices in Chicago.

Camp as an over-the-top strategy of communication that could once fly over the heads of the general population and speak to queer audiences has long-since been excavated. Pseudocidal Camper is a durational performance that investigates camp’s queer history, its cultural death, false commercial-reincarnation, and contemporary whereabouts. Through visual pun and surrealist symbolism, Vogds attempts a perpetual escape of his own pop-cultural reflection; a large-scale, side-ways tent. In complete isolation, his personal language of free-pop vocalizations becomes a relentless, self-reflective collection of riffs that both negate and embrace camp’s colonialized grave-site, a sort of speaking-in-tongues to deceased queer authentic-campers. Investigating his own body as a campsite for trend and curated identity, Vogds grapples with his inevitable failure to free himself from the tent mausoleum, like a live gif trapped in a highly orchestrated glitch. The mallet and the stake may have built the tent, but their misuse can only haunt the idea of dismantlement.

Jay Besemer and Petra Kuppers

Book Release for Jay Besemer's Chelate and Petra Kuppers PearlStitch

On Thursday November 10th at 7pm, we will celebrate new books from Jay Besemer and Petra Kuppers, who will both give readings. Doors open at 6:30 pm. This event is free.

Written during the advent of hormone therapy and gender transition, Chelate by Jay Besemer explores the journey towards a new embodiment, one that is immediately complicated by the difficult news of a debilitating illness. This engaging chronicle speaks powerfully and poetically to the experience of inhabiting a toxic body, and the ruptures in consciousness and language that arise when confronted by a stark imperative, and choosing to live, and to change. The book moves intermittently from exile and alienation to hopeful anticipation, played out in short bursts of imaginative dreamwork, where desires eventually give way to their realities, as the self begins mapping the permutations of its momentous shift. What begins in uncertainty and commitment ends in self-recognition, and more uncertainty, but now in a necessary space unified by will, love, action, process, and documentation.

Jay Besemer is the author of many poetic artifacts including Telephone (Brooklyn Arts Press), A New Territory Sought (Moria), Aster to Daylily (Damask Press), and Object with Man’s Face (Rain Taxi Ohm Editions). His performances and video poems have been featured in various live arts festivals and series, including Meekling Press’ TALKS Series; Chicago Calling Arts Festival; Red Rover Series {readings that play with reading}; Absinthe & Zygote; @Salon 2014 and Sunday Circus. Jay also contributes performance texts, poems, and critical essays to numerous publications, is a contributing editor with The Operating System, the co-editor of a special digital Yoko Ono tribute issue of Nerve Lantern, and founder of the Intermittent Series in Chicago, where he lives with his partner and a very helpful cat.

In PearlStitch, Petra Kuppers initiates us in ritual conversation, collective and intimate. Her embodied engagement with the political, mythical, pop cultural, feminist, historical and scientific brings poetics into the commons all the way through to the tender touch of lovers—knitting labor with Eros, “beneath your fingers, worker, is your fantasy and your redemption, meet my eyes, beloved,/turn around.” These are incantatory poems, stitching together (the purl of) factory floors, canopies, rivers, borders, sidewalks and streets. Invocations of singer Madonna, Beatrice and Sophia converge with Jung, Wittig and Audre Lorde. Kuppers contends with systemic violence as in the murder of women in Júarez, Mexico and the ravages of neoliberal capitalisms, while also bringing the sensate, individual body into presence on the page, in alchemical discovery and in pain. She traces our own proprioceptive map of chronicity, a million tiny stabbing decrepitudes, “spines protruding into the melody’s gap./Glottal rhythm hiccup and veering off downward and out.” At the same time, and throughout, she dances in solidarity with queer and disability activists toward the possibilities of relational healing.–Denise Leto and Amber DiPietra

Petra Kuppers is a disability culture activist, a community performance artist, and a Professor of English and Women’s Studies at the University of Michigan, teaching in performance studies. She also teaches on the low-residency MFA in Interdisciplinary Arts at Goddard College. Her most recent poetry collection, PearlStitch, appeared with Spuyten Duyvil (2016). She has published poems and short stories in British and US journals like PANK, Adrienne, Visionary Tongue, Wordgathering, Poets for Living Waters, Disability Studies Quarterly, Beauty is a Verb: New Poetics of Disability, textsound, Streetnotes, Epistemologies, Accessing the Future, Quietus, Beyond the Boundaries, Cambrensis, About Place, and QDA: A Queer Disabled Anthology. She is the Artistic Director of The Olimpias, an international disability culture collective, and she is currently engaged in the Asylum Project, with her partner Stephanie Heit.

Galo Ghigliotto, Katherine M. Hedeen, Daniel Borzutzky, and Víctor Rodríguez Núñez

On Thursday, November 3rd at 7pm, Galo Ghigliotto, Katherine M. Hedeen, Daniel Borzutzky, and Víctor Rodríguez Núñez will give readings. Doors open at 6:30 pm. This event is free.

Daniel Borzutzky is the author of The Performance of Becoming Human, a 2016 National Book Award finalist for Poetry. His other books and chapbooks include In the Murmurs of the Rotten Carcass Economy (2015), Bedtime Stories for the End of the World! (2015), Data Bodies (2013), The Book of Interfering Bodies (2011), and The Ecstasy of Capitulation (2007). He has translated Raúl Zurita’s The Country of Planks (2015) and Song for his Disappeared Love (2010), and Jaime Luis Huenún’s Port Trakl (2008).  His most recent translation is Valdivia by Galo Ghigliotto. His work has been supported by the Illinois Arts Council, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Pen/Heim Translation Fund. He lives in Chicago.

Galo Ghigliotto was born in Valdivia, Chile. He is a poet, fiction writer and editor. His books of poetry include Valdivia (2006), Bonnie&Clyde (2007) y Aeropuerto (2009), and a work of fiction A cada rato el fin del mundo (2013). He is the publisher of an independent poetry press – Editorial Cuneta. He lives in Santiago, Chile.

Katherine M. Hedeen is Professor of Spanish at Kenyon College. Her latest book-length translations include collections by Hugo Mujica and Víctor Rodríguez Núñez. She is an associate editor of Earthwork’s Latin American Poetry in Translation Series for Salt Publishing and an acquisitions editor for Arc Publications. She is a two-time recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts Translation Project Grant.

Víctor Rodríguez Núñez is one of Cuba’s most outstanding contemporary writers. He has published more than thirty books of poetry throughout Latin America and Europe, and has received major awards all over the Spanish-speaking world. He divides his time between Gambier, Ohio, where he is Professor of Spanish at Kenyon College, and Havana, Cuba.

Erik Anderson, Phillip Williams, and Elizabeth Hall

On Saturday October 29th at 7pm, Erik Anderson, Phillip Williams, and Elizabeth Hall will give readings. Doors open at 6:30 pm. This event is free.

Erik Anderson is the author of three books of nonfiction, mostly recently Estranger (2016). His forthcoming collection of essays, Flutter Point, was selected by Amy Fusselman as the winner of the 2015 Zone 3 Creative Nonfiction Book Award, and will be published in 2017. He teaches at Franklin & Marshall College, where he directs the annual Emerging Writers Festival.

Elizabeth Hall lives and loves in Los Angeles. She is the author of the book I Have Devoted My Life to the Clitoris (Tarpaulin Sky Press) and the chapbook Two Essays (eohippus press). Her work has recently appeared in Best Experimental Writing, Black Warrior Review, LA Review of Books, Two Serious Ladies, and elsewhere.

Phillip B. Williams is a Chicago, Illinois native. He is the author of the book of poems Thief in the Interior (Alice James Books, 2016). He received scholarships from Bread Loaf Writers Conference and a 2013 Ruth Lilly Fellowship. Phillip received his MFA in Writing from the Washington University in St. Louis. He is the Co-editor in Chief of the online journal Vinyl, was the Emory University Creative Writing Fellow in Poetry for 2015-2016, and will be visiting professor in English at Bennington College for 2016-2017.

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A Rule By Nobody: Part II 

Opening Reception + Performance by Stephen Kwok

Part II of Third Object’s curatorial project, A Rule By Nobody, opens on Saturday, October 22 and features a live performance by Stephen Kwok from 7 to 9pm.

In the second part of A Rule By Nobody, the human body is implicated as the source material and delivery method for the bureaucratic machine. The co-working laborer, so bored that anything becomes possible, sets the tone for Stephen Kwok’s opening night performance in the Sector 2337 Offices. Globe Al Chemical Company’s installation continues in the back room and via out of office reply at ooo@globe-al.org.

Featured Artists: Stephen Kwok, Kelly Lloyd, Christopher Meerdo

Stephen Kwok works with text, objects, and live performance to create situations in which contradictions between a site and the activity within it may emerge. His work has been exhibited at American Medium, Julius Caesar, The Chicago Cultural Center, The Gene Siskel Film Center, Contemporary Arts Center New Orleans, The Ogden Museum, and the Lawndale Art Center in Houston. In the spring of 2016, he was a resident at Delfina Foundation in London. He is currently based in New York.

A Rule By Nobody is composed of a two-part group exhibition in Sector 2337’s rear project space, a video screening, a live performance, and a printed publication. The exhibition is organized by Third Object, a roving curatorial collective based in Chicago. Recent exhibitions include Slow Stretch, Mana Contemporary Chicago; Satellites, The Franklin; Were the Eye Not Sunlike, ACRETV and Fernwey; and Mossy Cloak, Roots and Culture. Third Object is Ann Meisinger, Raven Munsell, and Gan Uyeda.

Exhibiting artists include: (Part One) Naama Arad, Samuel Levi Jones, Hai Knafo, Andrew Norman Wilson / (Part Two) Stephen Kwok, Kelly Lloyd, Christopher Meerdo/ (Ongoing) Globe Al Chemical Company

Image: Kelly Lloyd, File Cabinet Full of Rorschach Blots Made with Acrylic Paint the Color of My Skin Inside File Folders, 2014-2015, file cabinet, acrylic, file folders.

Carla Harryman and Misha Pam Dick

On Friday October 21st at 7pm, Carla Harryman and Misha Pam Dick will give readings. Doors open at 6:30 pm. This event is free.

Misha Pam Dick (aka Gregoire Pam Dick, Mina Pam Dick et al.) is the author of this is the fugitive (Essay Press, 2016), Metaphysical Licks (BookThug, 2014) and Delinquent (Futurepoem, 2009). With Oana Avasilichioaei, she is the co-translator of Suzanne Leblanc’s The Thought House of Philippa (BookThug, 2015). Her writing has appeared in BOMB, Fence, The Capilano Review, EOAGH, Postmodern Culture, Aufgabe, The Brooklyn Rail, and elsewhere; her philosophical work has appeared in a collection published by the International Wittgenstein Symposium. Also an artist, Dick lives in New York City, where she is currently doing work that makes out and off with Hölderlin, Pizarnik and Michaux.

Carla Harryman is known for her genre-disrupting experimental writings such as Adorno’s Noise (Essay Press, 2008), W—/M— (Split/Level 2013), Baby (Adventures in Poetry, 2005), There Never Was a Rose Without a Thorn (City Lights, 1995), the experimental novel Gardener of Stars (Atelos 2002), and numerous collaborations in writing and performance: these include The Grand Piano, an experiment in autobiography (Mode D, 2006-2010); The Wide Road with Lyn Hejinian (Belladonna, 2011); and Open Box, a music/text work with Jon Raskin published on the Tzadik label.  Her poets theater and polyvocal performance works have been presented nationally and internationally. Sue in Berlin, a collection of performance writing and poets theater plays is forthcoming in French and English volumes from the To series of the University of Rouen Press. Gardener of Stars, an Opera, a work for speaking voices, microelectronics, and prepared piano will be presented in the Poets Theater Festival at Links Hall in Chicago in December 2016. She lives in the Detroit area and serves as Professor of English at Eastern Michigan University, where she coordinates the creative writing program.

Norman Finkelstein and Michael Heller

On Thursday, October 27th at 7pm, Norman Finkelstein and Michael Heller will give readings. Doors open at 6:30 pm. This event is free.

Michael Heller is a poet, essayist, and critic. He is the author of twenty books, including This Constellation Is a Name, Living Root: A Memoir, Exigent Futures: New and Selected Poems, and Conviction’s Net of Branches, his award-winning study of the Objectivist poets. He lives in New York City.

Norman Finkelstein was born in New York City in 1954. He received his B.A. from Binghamton University and his Ph.D. from Emory University. He is a Professor of English at Xavier University in Cincinnati, Ohio, where he has lived since 1980. He is the author of ten books of poetry and five books of literary criticism, and has written extensively about modern poetry and Jewish literature.

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A Rule By Nobody: Screening

The Nightingale Cinema, 1084 N. Milwaukee Ave

On Sunday, October 16 at 7pm,  Third Object presents a curated offsite film screening in conjunction with their curatorial project,  A Rule by Nobody. A motivational, team-building corporate retreat through other people’s daily grind, the works in this program emulate and parody various workplaces and their hierarchical structures to reveal inner formulas, dogmas and breaking points. This event is hosted by The Nightingale Cinema.

Artists include: Simon Denny, Liz Magic Laser, Hanne Lippard, Jodie Mack, Ellen Nielsen, Kay Rosen, Pilvi Takala, Lawrence Weiner, and Andrew Norman Wilson.

A Rule By Nobody is composed of a two-part group exhibition, an ongoing back room installation, this offsite video screening, a live performance, and a printed publication. Third Object is a roving curatorial collective based in Chicago. Recent exhibitions include Slow Stretch, Mana Contemporary Chicago; Satellites, The Franklin; Were the Eye Not Sunlike, ACRETV and Fernwey; and Mossy Cloak, Roots and Culture. Third Object is Ann Meisinger, Raven Munsell, and Gan Uyeda.

Image: Liz Magic Laser, still from The Thought Leader, 2015

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On Translation: a Discussion with Writer-Translators

Part of the Lit & Luz Festival

On Wednesday October 12th at 7pm, we will host a conversation on translation with John Pluecker, Stalina Villarreal, Rebekah Smith, and Alexis Almeida. Daniel Borzutzky will moderate. This event is free and presented as part of the Lit and Luz Festival.

Alexis Almeida lives in Denver. Her poems, translations, essays, and interviews have appeared or are forthcoming in TYPO, Denver Quarterly, Aufgabe, Vinyl Poetry, Heavy Feather Review, and elsewhere. She is an assistant editor at Asymptote and performs with the poets’ theater group GASP. She was recently awarded a Fulbright grant, and is currently living in Buenos Aires working on an anthology of contemporary female poets living in Argentina.

Daniel Borzutzky grew up in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, of Chilean heritage. He has published three full-length volumes of poetry, The Ecstasy of Capitulation (2007), The Book of Interfering Bodies (2011), and The Performance of Becoming Human (2016). He is the Intercambio poetry editor for MAKE.

John Pluecker is a writer, interpreter, translator and co-founder of the language justice and literary experimentation collaborative Antena. His work is informed by experimental poetics, radical aesthetics and cross-border cultural production. His texts have appeared in journals in the US and Mexico and he has translated numerous books from the Spanish, including Tijuana Dreaming: Life and Art at the Global Border (Duke University Press). His book of poetry and image, Ford Over, was recently released.

Rebekah Smith teaches at LaGuardia Community College, edits at Ugly Duckling Presse, and usually lives in Brooklyn.

Stalina Emmanuelle Villarreal is a Mexican and Chicana poet, a translator, and an instructor of English at Houston Community College. Her translations have appeared in Sèrie Alfa: ArtiliteraturaEleven Eleven, and Mandorla, and her work can be found in Papeles de Manscupia, Her Kind, and at El Vértigo de los Aires: Encuentro Iberoamericano en el Centro Histórico 2009. Her visual poetry was part of the Antena Books exhibit at University of Houston’s Blaffer Art Museum during Spring 2014.

Garrett Caples and Wendy Spacek

On Friday October 7th at 7pm, Garrett Caples and Wendy Spacek will give readings. Doors open at 6:30 pm. This event is free.

Garrett Caples is the author of Power Ballads (2016), Retrievals (2014), The Garrett Caples Reader (1999), Complications (2007), and Quintessence of the Minor (2010). He is the co-editor of The Collected Poems of Philip Lamantia (2013) and Incidents of Travel in Poetry: New and Selected Poems by Frank Lima (2016). He is an editor at City Lights Books, where he curates the Spotlight Poetry Series. For City Lights, he has edited books by Joanne Kyger, Diane di Prima, David Meltzer, Charles Bukowski, John Wieners, and Michael McClure, among others.

Wendy Lee Spacek has published one book of poetry, PSYCHOGYNECOLOGY (Monster House Press, 2015). Her work has appeared in Blotterature, Monsterhousepress.com, Didactic and in LVNG Magazine by Flood Editions. She is an MFA candidate in poetry at Indiana University Bloomington.

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Luis Felipe Fabre

Lit & Luz Poet in Residence

From Oct 5-12, 2016 The Green Lantern Press partners with the 2016 Lit & Luz Festival to host visiting poet, Luis Felipe Fabre at Sector 2337.

Luis Felipe Fabre is a poet and critic based in Mexico City. He has published a volume of essays and poetry collections. Recent books of poetry include Poemas de terror y de misterio (2013) and Sor Juana and Other Monsters (2015). The latter was translated by John Pluecker and has been published by Ugly Duckling Presse.

About the Festival: Held each fall in Chicago and each February in Mexico City, the Lit & Luz Festival is a unique series of readings, discussions, and performances featuring renowned authors from the United States and Mexico. The festival highlights new translations and artistic collaborations that promote contemporary literature from both countries. Begun in 2014, the Lit & Luz Festival grew out of the pages of  MAKE magazine’s Intercambio portfolio. This Spanish-language cultural exchange has appeared in every issue since its debut in 2012 and has featured over 40 writers to date, many in English translation for the first time. Lit & Luz is produced by MAKE Literary Productions, NFP.

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Stephen Lapthisophon, Lorelei Stewart, Matthew Girson + Devin King

Panel Discussion

Join us on Fri, Sep 30th from 7-9pm for a panel discussion with Sector’s current exhibiting artist, Stephen Lapthisophon (Styles of Radical Will: Italian Sculpture), Green Lantern Press Curator and Poetry Editor Devin King, Gallery 400 Director, Lorelei Stewart and painter Matthew Girson.

Matthew Girson is an artist, curator and writer. His artworks have been exhibited locally, nationally and internationally. Recent exhibits include solo shows at the Chicago Cultural Center (2014) and Mission Projects (2016). Earlier this year he curated “Dianna Frid and Richard Rezac: Split Complementary” at the DePaul Art Museum. Matthew’s research interests focus on the legacy of modernism philosophically and artistically. He is a professor of painting and drawing at DePaul University.

Devin King co-curates Sector 2337 and teaches in the Liberal Arts department at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Stephen Lapthisophon is an American artist and educator working in the field of conceptual art, critical theory, and disability studies. Lapthisophon received his MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 1979. His early work combined poetry, performance, sound art, and visual arts with postmodern philosophical concerns. He was also influenced by the legacy of the Situationists, who sought to make everyday life a focus of artistic activity. Lapthisophon has taught at Columbia College in Chicago, the School of the Art Institute, and the University of Texas at Dallas. He currently teaches art and art history at The University of Texas at Arlington.

Lorelei Stewart, Director of Gallery 400 at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) since 2000, has organized over 50 exhibitions, including the Joyce Award-winning exhibition Edgar Arceneaux: The Alchemy of Comedy…Stupid (2006). In 2002 she initiated the acclaimed At the Edge: Innovative Art in Chicago series, a commissioning program that encouraged Chicago area artists’ experimental practices, and organized Stephen Lapthisophon’s solo exhibition With Reasonable Accommodation in the first year of that series. Stewart is a faculty member in UIC’s Museum and Exhibition Studies graduate program and a board member of Roots & Culture, Chicago. She holds an MA in Curatorial Studies from the Center for Curatorial Studies at Bard College, a BA from Smith College, and a BFA from Corcoran College of Art and Design.

 

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EXPO CHGO: Art After Hours.

City-Wide Gallery Openings

Friday September 23, 6-9PM, Sector 2337 will be open after hours on the occasion of the Chicago Art Fair.

Art After Hours encourages the public, as well as EXPO CHICAGO patrons and exhibitors to visit citywide art galleries, alternative spaces, and performance venues during extended hours. Art After Hours exposes visitors to Chicago’s vibrant gallery scene, coinciding with evening openings around the city, and the kick-off of the fall season.

For more on EXPO Art Week programming, please visit: expochicago.com

 

DEEP TIME CHICAGO

SYMPOSIUM/SEMINAR/EXCURSION

Reading Group: Saturday, September 17, 2016, 4-6pm at Sector 2337
2337 N. Milwaukee Ave., Chicago IL 60647;
this event is free and open to the public
First Seminar (Readings: Christopher Stone, “Should Trees Have Standing: Toward Legal Rights for Natural Objects” (1972) & The Introduction (pp 1-25) from Eduardo Kohn, How Forests Think (2013))

Field Trip: Sunday, September 18, 2016, 2-4 pm at Morton Arboretum
4100 Illinois Route 53, Lisle, IL 60532  

First Field Trip at Morton Arboretum with Dr. Chuck Cannon, Director of Tree Science (Readings: “How Do Tropical Forests Recover After Logging?” and “Tree Species Diversity in Commercially Logged Bornean Rainforest“)
This event is free and open to the public but space is limited, please register by September 13th.
RSVP Amelia Charter (ameliaaya@gmail.com)
Wear walking-appropriate attire.

The weekend’s events also include an Artist Talk: Friday, September 16, 2016, 1-2:15pm at Museum of Contemporary Photography
On the occasion of the exhibition Petcoke: Tracing Dirty Energy, exhibiting artists Oliver Sann, Brian Holmes and Claire Pentecost will discuss their work with Deep Time Chicago, an art/research/activism initiative formed in the wake of their participation in the Anthropocene Curriculum at the Haus der Kulturen der Welt in Berlin. They are joined by special guest Katrin Klingan, who led the Anthropocene Curriculum project.

Deep Time Chicago Curriculum is an art/research/activism initiative formed in the wake of the Anthropocene Curriculum events at HKW in Berlin, Germany. The initiative’s goal is to continue exploring one core idea: humanity as a geological agency, capable of disrupting the earth system and inscribing itself into deep time. By knitting together group readings, guided walks, lectures, panels, screenings, performances, publications and exhibitions, the initiative seeks to develop a public research trajectory, offering a variety of formats where Chicago area inhabitants can grapple with this crucial question of our time.

This event is organized in conjunction with The Goethe Institute.

I Have Wanted to be Every Girl Ever

Book Release for Olivia Cronk's Louise and Louise and Louise

On Friday September 16th at 7pm, we will celebrate a new book from Olivia Cronk. Nine performers will read, invoking the written text. Doors open at 6:30 pm. This event is free.

I HAVE WANTED TO BE EVERY GIRL EVER is a release party for Olivia Cronk’s Louise and Louise and Louise. The book connects genre tropes to the public and private performances of all ages of women to ask how giving birth and becoming a parent could be understood as a shift in genre: horror, sci-fi, fantasy, or soap opera. I HAVE WANTED is a performance in search of Louise and Louise and Louise; it is one giant text created by a collaging of texts from nine performers, all of whom appear, directly or indirectly, in the pages of the book. The performance is an invocation, an acting out of what preceded the written text. It celebrates multiplicity, plasticity, iteration, and girl-ness (of any type).

Benjamin Arakawa’s work is concentrated on back alley type secrets, exposed through the use of an outlet he calls “poemographic” addiction. He is currently a graduate student at Northeastern Illinois University.

Olivia Cronk is the author of Louise and Louise and Louise (The Lettered Streets Press, 2016) and Skin Horse (Action Books, 2012), and co-edits The Journal Petra (thejournalpetra.com).

Kathryn Hudson studies English at Northeastern Illinois University. Interested in the politics of literature, she is working to explore the ways in which we manipulate our perceptions and how this manipulation emerges as mutation and restriction.

Natalie Roman is interested in modes of inquiry that straddle the lines between the creative and the critical. Her research interests include critical race theory, aesthetics, poetics, and the limits and possibilities of community.

Christine Simokaitis is a prose writer who has a tremendous capacity to recall distinct images from the 1984 Seventeen Magazine Fall Fashion issue.

Carleen Tibbetts is the author of to exosk(elle), the last sugar (Zoo Cake Press, 2015). Recent work appears or is forthcoming in H_NGM_N, TYPO, Forklift Ohio, The Offending Adam, FLAG + VOID, La Vague, DREGINALD, jubilat, and other publications.

Sara Wainscott makes poems and comic experiments and co-curates Wit Rabbit, an inter-genre reading series. She can be found driving down Western Avenue / singing along with upbeat songs about despair.

Daniel Woody lives in Chicago, where he writes poems, takes pictures, and makes friends. Some of his work can be found online at BOAAT, The Volta, Opiate, and HOUND.

Michael O'Leary and Kenyatta Rogers

Book Release for Michael O'Leary's The Reception

On Thursday September 15th at 7pm, we will celebrate a new book from Michael O’Leary. O’Leary and Kenyatta Rogers will give readings. Doors open at 6:30 pm. This event is free.

A founding editor of both LVNG and Flood Editions, Michael O’Leary works as a structural engineer and lives with his family in Chicago. The Reception is his first book of poetry.

Kenyatta Rogers earned his MFA in Creative Writing Poetry from Columbia College Chicago. He is a Cave Canem fellow and was twice nominated for both Pushcart and Best of the Net prizes, his work has been previously published in or is forthcoming from Jubilat, Vinyl, Bat City Review, The Volta among others. He is an Associate Editor with RHINO and currently serves on the Creative Writing Faculty at The Chicago High School for the Arts.

Wasted Hours – an evening of performance

Michal Samama + Alberto Aguilar

Wasted hours – an evening of performance, curated by Every house has a door, presents commissioned works by Michal Samama and Alberto Aguilar. Wasted Hours is the third collaborative curatorial coproduction between Every house and The Green Lantern Press. As the only live part of the experimental online exhibition Institutional Garbage (Sector 2337 and Hyde Park Art Center), Wasted Hours considers performance in ways analogous to the exhibition’s framing of the hidden aspects of institutions. The title derives from a letter by the poet Emily Dickinson, written on a September day 170 years ago.

… Does it seem as though September had come? How swiftly summer has fled, and what report has it borne to heaven of misspent time and wasted hours? Eternity only will answer. …

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I will write this biography using 165 words but will not discover this number until it is complete. From this point forward he will be speaking in third person. Alberto Aguilar is a Chicago-based aartist and was born there as well. Aguilar’s creative practice often incorporates whatever materials are at hand as well as exchanges with his family, other aartists, and people he encounters. His work bridges media from painting and sculpture to video, installation, performance, and sound and has been exhibited at Chicago’s Museum of Contemporary AArt, the Queens Museum, Crystal Bridges Museum of American AArt, the Nelson-Atkins Museum of AArt, the Minneapolis Institute of AArt and the AArt Institute of Chicago. He holds a BFA and an MFA from the School of the AArt Institute of Chicago and currently teaches at Harold Washington College one of the City Colleges of Chicago. In order to create slight confusion, he has added an extra letter A where ever the word aart appears in this bio.

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Michal Samama creates body-based art, incorporating movement, everyday objects, sound, text and site-specific practices. Her work moves between the theater, the gallery and the public space, exploring the different dynamics by which these spaces are capable of ‘framing’ art. She recently presented works at Theatre de la Ville in Paris, ASPECT RATIO Gallery in Chicago, Intima-Dance and Curtain Up Festivals in Tel Aviv and was commissioned by The Chocolate Factory Theater in New York. In Chicago, her work has been presented at Julius Caesar Gallery, EXPO CHICAGO 2014, 6018 North Gallery, Rapid Pulse Festival 2014 and TBSO3 at Defibrillator Gallery, Out of Site 2015, Mana Contemporary, Links Hall, TRITRIANGLE and Northwestern University. In New York she presented her work at New York Live Arts, Movement Research at Judson Church, Performance Mix Festival, Dixon Place, Joyce SoHo, CPR, Chez Bushwick, Priska C. Juschka Gallery, AUNTS and the 92nd Street Y, where she also curated Sunday At Three in January 2012.

About the curatorsEvery house has a door was formed in 2008 by Lin Hixson, director, and Matthew Goulish, dramaturge, to convene project-specific teams of specialists, including emerging as well as internationally recognized artists. Drawn to historically or critically neglected subjects, Every house creates performances in which the subject remains largely absented from the finished work. The performances distil and separate presentational elements into distinct modes – recitation, installation, movement, music—to grant each its own space and time, and inviting the viewer to assemble the parts in duration, after the fact of the performance, to rediscover the missing subject. Works include Let us think of these things always. Let us speak of them never. (2009) in response to the work of Yugoslavian filmmaker Dušan Makavejev, Testimonium (2013) a collaboration with the band Joan of Arc in response to Charles Reznikoff’s Testimony poems, and the on-going project 9 Beginnings based on local performance archives.

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End of Summer Book Sale ! ! 

20% off all titles August 10 - August 20th

The Summer Bookstore is coming to an end and so we’re offering a special sale starting August 10 and ending August 20, 20% percent off all books! We’ve put out Green Lantern Press titles that we’ve published over the past 11 years, as well as a wide selection of small press titles, limited edition chapbooks, and poetry, fiction, theory, and art titles. We’ve also loaded our library cart with discount steals at and below $5.

Proceeds from summer book sales help support exhibition and public programs at Sector during the 2016-2017 season.

Regular store hours: Wed-Sun 12-6pm

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Summer Bookstore

Jun 03 - Aug 20, 2016

From Fri Jun 03 to Sat Aug 20, 2016, Sector 2337 operates exclusively as a summer bookshop specializing in poetry, fiction, art, theory, and small press titles. Featured titles include limited edition chapbooks and artist books by presses like La HouleMeekling Press, and Publication Studio; poetry from The Cultural Society, Flood Editions, Kenning Editions, The Song Cave, Wave Books, Verge Books and others; fiction from presses like Curbside Splendor, Dorothy A Publishing Project, Dzanc, Featherproof; art and theory books from the likes of MOTTO, Paper Monument, Poor Farm Press, The Renaissance Society, Soberscove, and Semiotext(e); plus a smattering of donated and discounted used books including (loads more!) poetry, murder mysteries for the beach, and art catalogues. Proceeds from summer sales help support exhibition and public programs at Sector during the 2016/2017 season; regular cultural programming—produced by The Green Lantern Press—will resume at Sector 2337 in September 2016.

Sector 2337 is not hosting any public events this summer. If you are interested in proposing an event for the fall, please use our contact form.

End of Season Ping Pong Tournament

Celebrating 11 years of The Green Lantern Press

Come celebrate 11 years of The Green Lantern Press on Saturday, May 28th from 2-10pm. $20 for Food + 1 Drink. $5 to enter Ping Pong Tournament w/ free play until 6pm depending on tournament participation / estimated tournament start time is 6pm.** All entrants can also participate in the free draw table for ping pong ball decoration. 
**depending on the number of official participants, tournament may begin earlier
 

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With thanks to Revolution for donating beer / Chris Glomski + Ben Chaffee for loaning the Ping Pong tables / Trophy makers Amelia Charter, Dao Nguyen, Erik Peterson, Peter Speer, + Sonia Yoon / Referees Lou Sterett + Amelia Charter / Neil Brideau of Radiator Comics for the flyer / and all of you for always

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Make Yourself Useful

Seminar + Discussion Group

Join us on Thursday, May 19th from 6:30-8:30pm for the Make Yourself Useful (MYU) Reading Group. This is the North West / Logan Square location, date and time for the third MYU group meeting. The readings are uploaded to the group as PDFs so you can download them from Facebook.

 

READINGS 
– “School Desegregation” by Steve Bogira, The Chicago Reader
– “We Are Family: Black Nationalism, Black Masculinity, and the
– Black Gay Cultural Imagination” by Amy Abugo Ongiri
– “What does an Ally Do?” from Uprooting Racism, Paul Kivel
HOME VIEWING
– “Lemonade” the visual album by Beyoncé [available here:https://goo.gl/wz0idd]
– “‪#‎RememberRekia‬ action at NFL Draft Town” by Assata’s Daughters [available here: https://goo.gl/UD5esM]

MEETINGS
MYU North West: Thursday May 19th 6:30pm @ Sector 2337
MYU North: Sunday May 22nd 4pm @ The Common Cup
MYU Pilsen: Saturday May 28th @ Present

ALL GROUP MEETING @ “our duty to fight’ @ Gallery 400; time/date TBD

HOMEWORK
MYU North West: Think about creative ways you combat/interrupt/contest racism and lovingly call in white folks. We will be brainstorming responses in order to build a collective tool kit.

DONATIONS
We will be collecting cash donations at each meeting for the next three months that will go towards the efforts of Assata’s Daughters. We will donate the total funds as a collective in July. Bring those 1’s and 5’s!

More info on the Black Lives Matter: Chicago exhibition at Gallery 400 is below.

Sector 2337 is ADA accessible; this reading group is free and open to the public.

 
Make Yourself Useful is a network of people committed to actively fortifying POC-led racial justice movements in Chicago and beyond. As people working to earn the chance to be accomplices in these struggles, we are initiating an experimental reading group, dedicated to lovingly holding each other and ourselves accountable in our quest to unlearn racism and confront white supremacy. We are also a mobilization body concentrated on the development of concrete ways to move up and move back, standing in direct and available solidarity with black and brown organizers. We are committed to making ourselves useful to the revolution for racial justice.
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New Arts Journalism Symposium

Saturday, May 14th, from 4:30-7pm, Sector 2337 celebrates the culmination of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago’s MA in New Arts Journalism program.

Opening remarks on the contemporary state of publishing will be made by Caroline Picard (The Green Lantern Press/Sector 2337), followed by thesis presentations: Jac Kuntz will discuss her research trip across the Southern United States and contemporary visual art of that region as it relates to community. Amie Soudien will present her research from the archives of Ebony magazine, examining its notions of beauty, and cultural significance during an era of reclaimed African heritage. Ana Sekler will present Chic Shifter, her a digital fashion publication that examines the fashion cultures of Chicago and the Midwest, emphasizing criticality over frivolity. Hannah Larson will present the publication, Arttoo Magazine, a synthesis of contemporary tattoo culture and intersectional feminist convictions, with an emphasis on tattoo art created–and worn–by women. The night will conclude with guest speaker, music critic and acclaimed Chicago writer, Jessica Hopper, music critic and author of The First Collection of Criticism by a Living Female Rock Critic (Featherproof).

 

Jessica Hopper’s music criticism has been included in Best Music Writing 2004, 2005, 2007, 2010 and 2011. Her first book, The Girls Guide to Rocking, was named one of 2009’s Notable Books for Young Readers by the American Library Association. She lives in Chicago with her husband and two young sons.

Jac Kuntz is a writer and artist from Atlanta, Ga. She earned a BFA in painting, a BA in Psychology, and a minor in art history from Clemson University, South Carolina. In addition to her journalistic pursuits, Kuntz enjoys the working in the editing and publication process. Her writing often takes a narrative form; she is currently writing a thesis on the state of contemporary art in the southern U.S., following a summer-long series of interviews, encounters, and road trips. She will soon be graduating with a Masters in New Arts Journalism from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Hannah Larson is a graphic designer, farmer, and community activist, in Bridgeport, a near south side neighborhood of Chicago. Currently, Larson is publishing the debut issue of Arttoo Magazine, a magazine dedicated to women, tattoo arts and culture, for her master’s thesis.

Ana Sekler is a writer from Chicago. She has published work in F Newsmagazine, Newcity, and Gapers Block. Clothing is an expressive outlet for her and she writes about it for her thesis publication, Chic Shifter, a digital fashion journal with an altered hem. Aside from collecting striped shirts and miniature objects, she collects diplomas from Chicago’s universities: two in French Literature and one in New Arts Journalism.

Amie Soudien is a writer and artist from Cape Town, South Africa. She completed her BAFA in print media from the Michaelis School of Fine Art at the University of Cape Town in 2013. Soudien has since worked as a freelance journalist for ArtThrob, and as an editor for Platform Magazine. Her interests include postcolonial studies, emerging art from Africa, and pop culture. She is a soon-to-be graduate of the Arts Journalism program at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

The Master of Arts in New Arts Journalism at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC) reinterprets and transforms the largely textual skills of traditional journalism into the multifaceted demands of contemporary arts journalism, where text and image are interwoven and responsive to one another and media platforms are continually evolving. The program both focuses on traditional modes of journalism that discuss art and other aspects of culture, and the ways in which journalism can itself, take on forms of artistic expression.

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Daniel Borzutzky + Jose-Luis Moctezuma (and Edgar Garcia, if we're lucky)

Joint Book Release

On Friday May 13th at 7pm, we will celebrate a new book and chapbook from Daniel Borzutzky and Jose-Luis Moctezuma. Borzutzky, Moctezuma and, if we’re lucky, Edgar Garcia will give readings. Doors open at 6:30 pm. This event is free.

Daniel Borzutzky’s books and chapbooks include, among others, In the Murmurs of the Rotten Carcass Economy (2015), Memories of my Overdevelopment (2015), Bedtime Stories for the End of the World! (2015), Data Bodies (2013), The Book of Interfering Bodies (2011), and The Ecstasy of Capitulation (2007). He has translated Raúl Zurita’s The Country of Planks (2015) and Song for his Disappeared Love (2010), and Jaime Luis Huenún’s Port Trakl (2008). His work has been supported by the Illinois Arts Council, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Pen/Heim Translation Fund. He lives in Chicago.

Jose-Luis Moctezuma’s critical and poetic work has been published in Jacket2, Chicago Review, Big Bridge, FlashPoint, Comma, and elsewhere. Spring Tlaloc Seance (Projective Industries, 2016) is his first chapbook. He was managing editor at MAKE Magazine. He is currently at work on a long narrative poem on the competing occult histories (and metahistories) of Chicago.

Edgar Garcia’s poems have appeared in Antioch ReviewBerkeley Poetry ReviewBig BridgeDamn the CaesarsMandorlaSous les PavésThose That This: Arts Journal, and Tzak: A Journal of Poetry and Poetics. A chapbook of his poems, Boundary Loot, was published by Punch Press in 2013. He teaches at the University of Chicago.

 

 

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BRILLIANCE! OPULENCE! GLOOM!

Alexandria Eregbu for Trunk Show

On Thursday, May 12, from 7-9pm Sector is pleased to host Trunk Show’s next exhibition opening. In tandem with her sticker release for Trunk Show, Alexandria Eregbu will present BRILLIANCE! OPULENCE! GLOOM! — a three part mixtape of contemporary collected sounds. Here, Eregbu’s collaged findings double as sonic and visual responses to womanhood, Black life, academia, resistance, and celebration. Dance party to follow.

 

 

Alexandria Eregbu is a conceptual artist and disciplinary deviant. Her practice often takes shape in the form of maker, performer, curator, educator, and programmer. Eregbu’s concerns frequently address performativity, visibility, ontology, resistance, locality, and mobility. Her work tends to insert itself at the axis of personal experience and myth— usually reliant upon the collection of artifacts, material culture, and an attentiveness to current and historical events.

Eregbu has been featured in a range of exhibitions including the Arts Incubator in Washington Park, Hyde Park Art Center, Woman Made Gallery, Nightingale Cinema, Roots + Culture Contemporary Art Center, and The Franklin Outdoor in Chicago, IL; Milwaukee Art Museum in Milwaukee, WI; Distillery Gallery in Boston, MA; and Pioneer Works in Brooklyn, NY. Eregbu has held fellowships as Resident Curator with HATCH Projects (2013-14) and as Public Studio Artist in Residence at the Chicago Cultural Center (2015). Most recently Eregbu  was highlighted in Newcity’s Breakout Artists: Chicago’s Next Generation of Image Makers (2015) and she is a current Resident Artist and Curatorial Fellow with ACRE.

TRUNK SHOW is a mobile exhibition space usually located in Chicago. It features monthly solo shows for which artists are commissioned to design a limited edition bumper sticker. The sticker lives, rides along with and helps propel a medium beat-up 1999 forest green Ford Taurus owned by Raven Falquez Munsell and Jesse Malmed. In addition to the month-long exhibitions, the bumper stickers are sold à la carte and by annual subscription. Openings follow a nomadic, symbiotic logic and include a public affixing, conceptual catering and playlists. TRUNK SHOW has been featured in the Chicago Reader, Hyperallergic, Newcity (who also named it The Best New Gallery on a Car Bumper) and the Chicago Tribune, which deemed these missives among the Best of Visual Art in Chicago.

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Jenny Vogel + Benjamin Pearson

On Friday April 29th at 7:00 pm, we are pleased to present performances from Jenny Vogel and Benjamin Pearson. Doors are at 6:30 pm. This event is free.

Jenny Vogel’s Handbook for Photographic Investigation is a lecture about historical and paranormal mysteries and their photographic representations. The visuals for the lectures are created live, on-site with a copy machine, and are presented to the audience via projection. Legend, myth and the supernatural are persistent forces in society, despite an ever-growing trust in science; it is the iconography that changed. Though now in the scientific rather than the religious realms, the images are strikingly similar: blurry lights, faint traces of hard to define objects and the ever lasting conflict between believers and skeptics. From the Spiritualists of the 19th century who used the telegraph to communicate with the dead, to the real-time, livestreaming webcam of camgirls, the fascination of electronic transmissions and image creation has continued. The low-resolution black and white images from the copy machine feed our desire to believe, perpetuating the myth. Much like a magician Vogel creates a tension between the reality of the performance space and the blurry illusion of the projected images.

Description of Pearson’s Performance Forthcoming

Jenny Vogel works in video, photography and computer arts. Vogel’s art explores the world as viewed through new media technology using web-cameras, blogs and Google searches as source material. She received her MFA from Hunter College (NYC) in 2003. She is a 2005 NYFA fellow in Computer Arts and is currently Assistant Professor of New Media Art at the University of Massachusetts. Her work has been screened and exhibited in group and solo- shows in numerous locations and galleries: Storefront Gallery, NYC; The Dallas Museum of Art, TX; McKinney Contemporary, TX; San Francisco Camerawork, CA; Arnolfini, UK; The Siberia Biennial, Russia; The Swiss Institute, NYC; EFA Gallery, NYC; Kunstwerke, Berlin; PS1 Contemporary Art Center, NYC.

Benjamin Pearson (b.1984 – Toronto, ON) is an artist based out of Chicago. His video and performance work is concerned with the History of the present, its peripheries and contingencies. He has recently exhibited at CPH:DOX (Copenhagen), Gene Siskel Film Center (Chicago), the Lincoln Center (NYC), Kasseler Dokfest (Kassel). Images Film Festival (Toronto), EFF Portland (Portland), Threewalls Gallery (Chicago) Chicago Filmmakers (Chicago), Gallery 400 (Chicago) MIXNYC (NYC), BRIC (Brooklyn). He is currently a lecturer at the School of The Art Institute of Chicago. 

David Buuck & Marcelo Morales Cintero

On Thursday April 28th at 7pm, David Buuck & Marcelo Morales Cintero will give readings. Doors open at 6:30 pm. This event is free. Co-Sponsored by MAKE Magazine.

David Buuck is a writer who lives in Oakland, CA. He is the founder of BARGE, the Bay Area Research Group in Enviro-aesthetics, and co-founder and editor of Tripwire, a journal of poetics. Recent publications include SITE CITE CITY (Futurepoem, 2015) and An Army of Lovers, co-written with Juliana Spahr (City Lights, 2013). A Swarming, A Wolfing is forthcoming from Roof Books in fall 2016. davidbuuck.com /tripwirejournal.com

Marcelo Morales Cintero, born in Cuba in 1977, is a member of a generation of writers who came of age in Havana during the island’s “Special Period” of severe post-Soviet economic crisis. His influences range from international literature to readings in history and philosophy. Dedicated to the slow development of his book projects, Morales has earned many of his literary awards for segments of larger works in progress. For example, excerpts that would come together to form his 2006 poetry collection El mundo como objetowon the 2004 poetry prize presented by La Gaceta de Cuba, as well as an honorable mention in the national Julián del Casal prize competition and a coveted finalist position in the international Casa de las Américas competition. Morales is also the author of the poetry collections Cinema (1997, Pinos Nuevos prize) and Materia (winner of the 2008 Julián del Casal prize), among others. His novel La espiral appeared in 2006. Morales edited and introducedComo un huésped de la noche, an anthology of poetry by Roberto Branly, published in 2010. His work has appeared in MAKE Magazine and is forthcoming in MAKE X, a best of MAKE anthology.

 

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Book Release: Peter O'Leary's The Sampo

with a reading from Peter O'Leary and music from Robert M. Hutmacher, ofm

On Wednesday April 27th, we will celebrate the release of Peter O’Leary’s The SampoFather Bob Hutmacher will perform some of his compositions for harp and then improvise alongside a reading from O’Leary. Doors open at 6:30 pm. This event is free.

Peter O’Leary will read from The Sampo, a new long poem that resets stories of wizards and witches from Finnish mythology. He will be joined by Father Bob Hutmacher, OFM, who will accompany Peter’s reading by improvising on his harp. Father Bob, a Franciscan friar, directs Chiesa Nuova, a musical ministry dedicated to allowing people to witness God’s beauty through the performing arts. Before the reading, Father Bob will perform some of his compositions for the harp.

What is the Sampo?

The Sampo is an object of great power, a talisman of deep earth and high art, forged by the smith Ilmarinen for the wizard Väinämöinen. But Louhi, the witch of the north, has locked it in the heart of a mountain, in dreary Sariola, land of always dawning gloom. Väinämöinen and his band of heroes must steal back their treasure and escape south, with an enraged Louhi in their wake…

Drawing episodes from the Kalevala, a Finnish epic, Peter O’Leary has created a poem of atmospheric intensity, full of elemental forces harnessed by supernatural craft. Line by line, it is composed of images and epi- thets that flicker into animation, condensed phrases that cascade into sequences of unfolding action. Throughout the quest, The Sampo returns us to the hazards of making, the power of singing, and the adventure of poetry.

Peter O’Leary is the author of five books of poetry, most recently, The Sampo, published by the Cultural Society. A book of criticism, Thick and Dazzling Darkness: Religious Poetry in a Secular Age, is forthcoming from Columbia University Press. With John Tipton, he edits Verge Books. He teaches at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and at the University of Chicago, and lives in Oak Park.

Robert M. Hutmacher, ofm has been a Franciscan friar since 1968 and was ordained a priest in 1979. Music has been his life since he was 5 and flowed through his education. He holds degrees in sociology, an M.Div. in theology and liturgy from Catholic Theological Union, Chicago, and the MA in music and liturgical studies from the University of Notre Dame. Music studies were also done at the University of Memphis, Quincy University, Northland College along with private study of harp and piano. He has recorded 13 collections, the most recent being The Nature Suite, recorded in Italy in 2015 and released numerous compositions through U.S. and Italian publishers. He is the founder and presently artistic director of Chiesa Nuova, a Franciscan ministry devoted to the performing arts; Chiesa Nuova has presented over 530 artists since 1996 all over the U.S. and Europe. He has concertized throughout the U.S., Canada, Italy, Germany and Singapore. Friar Bob has been associated with St. Peter’s in the Loop since 1993 and was Director of Worship there until 2012. Presently he serves as an assistant at Ascension Parish, Oak Park and continues to compose, inspire and bring people to God through splendid preaching, the arts and a great sense of humor.

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THE SEXUAL ORGANS OF THE IRS

Philip Good / Jennifer Karmin / Bernadette Mayer

On Friday, April 22 from 7-9pm, Sector 2337 will host the release of Jennifer Karmin and Bernadette Mayer’s collaborative chapbook THE SEXUAL ORGANS OF THE IRS with readings from Philip Good, Jennifer Karmin, and Bernadette Mayer

 

Bernadette Mayer is the author of over 27 collections, including Ethics of Sleep (2011), The Helens of Troy, New York (2013), Eating The Colors Of A Lineup Of Words: The Early Books of Bernadette Mayer (2015), as well as countless chapbooks and artist-books. She has received grants from the Guggenheim Foundation, National Endowment for the Arts, the Foundation for Contemporary Arts, and was the recipient of the 2014 Shelley Memorial Award from the Poetry Society of America. From 1980-1984, she served as director of the St. Mark’s Poetry Project. She founded and edited 0 to 9 journal, in addition to United Artists books and magazines. She has taught at the New School for Social Research, Naropa University, Long Island University, and Miami University.

Jennifer Karmin’s multidisciplinary projects have transpired across the U.S., Cuba, Japan, Kenya, and Europe. Venues for these pieces include: the Poetry Project (NY), the Walker Art Center (MN), Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibits (CA), and Woodland Pattern Book Center (WI). A founding curator of the Red Rover Series, she teaches creative writing to immigrants at Truman College and is the author of the text-sound epic Aaaaaaaaaaalice. Her poetry is widely published and featured in I’ll Drown My Book: Conceptual Writing by Women, The &NOW Awards: The Best Innovative Writing, and the Iraq War chronicle 4000 Words 4000 Dead + Revolutionary Optimism: An American Elegy. This spring Convulsive Editions will release The Sexual Organs of the IRS & Other Poems, a collaborative chapbook with Bernadette Mayer.

Philip Good recently completed Poem A Month, 12 poems for each month with corresponding artwork. He is included in Infiltration, An Anthology of Innovative Poetry from the Hudson River Valley and Helix Syntax, the 41st Summer Writing Program Magazine, Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics, Naropa University. His work can also be found online at BigBridge, Exquisite Corpse, Tool and The Volta. He is the author of UNTITLED WRITINGS FROM A MEMBER OF THE BLANK GENERATION. Listen to Philip Good on POET RAY’D YO.

Sara Deniz Akant / Margaret Ross / Callie Garnett

On Thursday April 21st at 7pm, Sara Deniz Akant, Margaret Ross, and Callie Garnett will give readings. Doors open at 6:30 pm. This event is free.

Sara Deniz Akant is the author of Babette, selected by Maggie Nelson for the Rescue Press Black Box Poetry Prize, as well as Parades (Omnidawn, 2014) and Latronic Strag (Persistent Editions, 2015). Her work has been recognized with fellowships from Yaddo, MacDowell, and the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, and has appeared most recently in The Brooklyn RailThe Denver Quarterlyjubilat, and Lana Turner. Akant has taught poetry and writing at the University of Iowa and the City University of New York.

Margaret Ross is the author of A Timeshare, selected by Timothy Donnelly for the Omnidawn Poetry Book Prize. Her poems and translations appear in A Public Space, Boston Review, Fence, The New Republic and The New Yorker. Her honors include scholarships and fellowships form the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference, the Fulbright Program, the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, Yaddo and Stanford, where she is currently a Stegner Fellow.

Callie Garnett was born and raised in Brooklyn. Having completed a masters in English at the University of Iowa, she now works for Bloomsbury Publishing. Hallelujah, I’m a Bum is her first published collection.

 

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Make Yourself Useful

Seminar + Discussion Group

Join us on Wednesday, April 20th from 6-8:30pm for the Make Yourself Useful (MYU) Reading Group. This is the North West / Logan Square location, date and time for the second MYU group meeting. The readings (below) are uploaded to the group as PDFs so you can download them from Facebook. Additionally, MYU will collect cash donations for the Chicago Community Bond Fund so bring any extra 1’s and 5’s if you’ve got ’em. And no sweat if you don’t. Sector 2337 is ADA accessible; this reading group is free and open to the public.
 
Make Yourself Useful is a network of people committed to actively fortifying POC-led racial justice movements in Chicago and beyond. As people working to earn the chance to be accomplices in these struggles, we are initiating an experimental reading group, dedicated to lovingly holding each other and ourselves accountable in our quest to unlearn racism and confront white supremacy. We are also a mobilization body concentrated on the development of concrete ways to move up and move back, standing in direct and available solidarity with black and brown organizers. We are committed to making ourselves useful to the revolution for racial justice.

 

READINGS for 04.20.16: available on Facebook
– “We didn’t start a movement. We started a Network” by Patrisse Marie Cullors-Brignac
– “To My White Friends Who See Tragedy In The Black Community and Say Nothing, Make It Personal” by Kiara Imani Williams
– “The Black Power Movement: A State of the Field” by Peniel E. Joseph
– “I, Racist” by John Metta
–  Act 3 of the podcast This American Life, Episode #573 “Status Update” (listen via this link )
MYU will also have The Joyful Giving Inventory ready to be put in action. The Joyful Giving Inventory is a database of goods and services that racial justice accomplices can joyfully give to activists of color on the front lines. Joyful Giving is designed as one method for (mostly white) accomplices to actively support black and brown organizations, initiatives and actions. What essential, utilitarian, or therapeutic goods and services do you have in excess? What would you be able to provide that would feel good to you? What could you give that you would be happy to give again (and again)? The joyful aspect is as important as the giving! We encourage you to think expansively and creatively about what you have to offer! Some examples range from essential items like baked goods or a temporary spare room to utilitarian items like a station wagon or graphic design services to therapeutic items like homemade ice cream or a massage. Just be intentional!MYU plans to compile the responses into an online database to be privately shared with organizers from some of the following organizations: Black Youth Project 100, Fearless Leading by the Youth, Assata’s Daughters, Chicago Freedom School, The Workers Center for Racial Justice, Black Lives Matter Chicago. When/if your offered services are needed, these organizers can then be in touch with you directly.

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Hegel’s Kilogram

On the Measure of Metrical Units

NOTE EARLY START TIME On Thursday, April 14th at 4:30pm, Nathan Brown will give a talk on Hegel’s theory of measure. This event is co-presented with InterCcECT. Doors open at 4:00pm. This event is free.

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Hegel’s Kilogram: On the Measure of Metrical Units

Hegel’s theory of measure, articulated in the Science of Logic, was developed shortly after the foundation of the metric system in the late 18th century. The establishment of physical standards for the meter and the kilogram, fabricated and archived at the International Bureau of Weights and Measures in Sèvres in 1799, illustrates Hegel’s understanding of measure as “the concrete truth of being” in a curiously salient way, demanding consideration of the relation between scientific accuracy, metaphysical speculation, and material particularity. The metric system instantiated universal standards of measure in singular physical objects, themselves created through meticulous measurement practices, thus dramatizing the problem of grounding in relation to both particular metrical units and the practice of science in general.

 

What is at stake, conceptually and empirically, when these inaugural units are themselves redefined? Since the 1960s, key standards of the International System of Units (SI) have been redefined on the basis of numerical constants, such as the speed of light (c) and the elementary charge (e), rather than physical objects. This paper considers ongoing efforts to redefine the kilogram unit on the basis of the Planck constant, focusing in particular on Watt Balance experiments carried out at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. These experiments offer a fascinating contemporary case study of the problem of measure. Considering both their empirical operations and their conceptual implications, Brown argues that the redefinition of metrical units is a key site for thinking not only the imbrication of epistemology and ontology, but also for understanding the history of modernity at the crux of science and philosophy.

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Nathan Brown is Canada Research Chair in Poetics in the Department of English at Concordia University, Montreal, where he directs the Centre for Expanded Poetics. He is the author of The Limits of Fabrication: Materials Science, Materialist Poetics, forthcoming from Fordham University Press.

Inter Chicago Circle for Experimental Critical Theory or InterCcECT convenes a Chicago circle of readers, writers, thinkers, and makers working in and beyond the university, through and around the commitment to theory. “Theory” we encompass in its critical, experimental, philosophical, aesthetic, political, literary, and psychoanalytic forms. InterCcECT coordinates the union of sets in Chicago via reading groups, workshops, performances, conferences, seminars, studios, parties, and other platforms.

Joni Murphy / Malcolm Sutton / Popahna Brandes

Joint book release for Double Teenage + Job Shadowing

Join us on Fri, April 08 at 7-9 pm for a joint book release with Bookthug authors, Joni Murphy’s (Double Teenage) and Malcolm Sutton (Job Shadowing) with Popahna Brandes (IN AN I, Sidebrow, 2015).  Doors open at 6:30pm. This event is free.

About Double Teenage (Book Thug, 2016) tells the story of Celine and Julie, two girls coming of age in the 1990s in a desert town close to the US–Mexico border. Starting from their shared love of theater, the girls move into a wider world that shimmers with intellectual and artistic possibility, but at the same time, is dense with threat. This unrelenting novel asks what it feels like to be a girl, simultaneously a being and a thing, feeling in a marketplace. Part bildungsroman, part performance, part passionate essay, part magic spell, what Double Teenage ultimately offers is a way to see through violence into an emotionally alive place beyond the myriad traps of girlhood.

About Job Shadowing (Book Thug, 2016): My slow adaptation is to her a sign of my being ‘outside life.’  An unemployed man, losing his ability to imagine a future self, disappears into the shadow world of an ambitious millennial. His wife, an idealistic artist at the turning point of her career, falls deeper and deeper into the gravitational field of her ultra-wealthy employer. Job Shadowing is a novel of our 20th-century desires torn asunder by the new millennium. Through stylish, searching prose, it tests the grounds of impossible love, generational identity and middle-class fantasy.

Popahna Brandes is the author of In An I, (Sidebrow Books, 2015); The Sea In Me/The Riddle We Heard (The Corresponding Society); and Reading Tests, in collaboration with Jack Henrie Fisher and a machinic interlocutor (Jan Van Eyck Academie). Works of translation, prose, film and music have been published by Belladonna*, The Encyclopedia Project, Sleepingfish, Ein Magazin über OrteTarpaulin Sky, and Pocket Myth. She has led classes in lyrical and impossible narrative forms for many years, runs an annual writing workshop in the book village of Montolieu, France, and has collected a few sticks in Chicago where she now lives. Her current book project examines invisible domestic labor and peripatetic language allowances.

Joni Murphy is a writer and artist living in New York City. Originally from Las Cruces, New Mexico, she has shown and published work in the US, Canada, the UK, Switzerland, Serbia, and Greece. Her creative output takes the form of poetry, criticism, curatorial projects, audio, and performance. She has an MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and was an artist in residence with Sound Development City’s 2016 expedition to Belgrade and Athens. Double Teenage is her debut novel.

Malcolm Sutton lives in Toronto. His fiction has appeared in Maisonneuve and Joyland, and his writing on art has appeared in C Magazine and Border Crossings. He is the Founding Editor of The Coming Envelope journal of innovative prose, and the Fiction Editor at BookThug Press. Job Shadowing is his debut novel.

culebra + Zenith

Joint book release for Roberto Harrison + Patrick Durgin

From 7-9pm, April 2nd, 2016, Sector 2337 will host a joint Green Lantern Press book release for Roberto Harrison (culebra, GLP, 2016), and Patrick Durgin (Zenith, GLP, 2016), featuring poetry readings from Harrison, Paul Martinez-Pompa, and a live music performance by Carol Genetti and Albert Wildeman. Doors open at 6:30pm. This event is free.

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About culebra: “Roberto Harrison is a minimalist, but his poems transmit consciousness through association and fragmentation. culebra ‘knows to be the one another time within/ as it dissolves/ in mountains’ and evokes the important paradox of inconstancy and stillness that underlies the eco-spiritual life of the Americas. In poems that slither in spiritual migration towards unity, Harrison becomes the visionary poet of the Anthropocene, the poet we need for the other side of our age.” — Carmen Giménez Smith

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About Zenith:  Zenith (2015-2016) is the third in a series of printed objects or “artist’s books” by Patrick Durgin, each with the dimensions of a 7” vinyl record. Zenith is a set of seven scratch off cards with the revelatory promise of pre-loaded Macintosh desktop wallpaper images, e.g. of a pinkish Mt. Fuji, or prairie grasses dangling in the breeze. Zenith cites a history of broadcast technology, addiction as a faultless economic engine, and gaming as a way to withhold suspense.

About Authors and Performers:

Patrick Durgin is the author of PQRS (Kenning Editions, 2013) and The Route (with Jen Hofer, Atelos, 2008). You can read his criticism in Contemporary Women’s WritingJournal of Modern Literature, and Postmodern CultureThe Volta published “Prelude to PQRS,” a reflection on his work in poets theater originally presented at the New [New] Corpse event series of Green Lantern Gallery. His performance piece Interference was featured in the 2015 Festival of Poets Theater at Sector 2337 and the script published in the newspaper that December. He is currently writing two books: a critical biography of Jackson Mac Low and Hannah Weiner and a collection of poetry with the working title Imitation Demise. He edits the non-fiction series Ordinance for Kenning Editions, an independent press he founded in 1998. He teaches at the School of the Art Institute of Chic

Carol Genetti is a vocalist, composer and installation artist. Her work is focused on the interplay between the voice as an expressive musical instrument and its extension into the sound-making realm. She has developed a personal yet universal palette that is an abstraction of “extended” voice sounds — breaths, overtones, and disconnected textual bits, squeaks, growls, non-verbal tones — sounds that evoke unconscious emotions and human physicality. She has collaborated with a large number of like-minded artists in both ad hoc groupings and long-standing partnerships, including her duos with electroacoustic improvisor Eric Leonardson; saxophonist Jack Wright; pianist/synthesist Jim Baker; guitarist/violinist Peter Maunu; composers Olivia Block and Adam Sonderberg; Turkish artist Deniz Gul (with Audrey Chen, Owen Davis, Frank Rosaly and Katie Young); and multi-disciplinary performances with dancer Asimina Chremos.  She has composed sound/music for Sonic Celluloid Festival, Outer Ear Sound Arts Festival, Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago and the Chicago Art Institute. Her sound installations utilizing tape loops and lathe-cut records have been exhibited at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago, the Spare Room Gallery and the Nova Art Fair. Labels that have published her recorded work include Balance Point Acoustics, Crouton, Dead CEO, Last Visible Dog, Recorded and Spring Garden Music.

Roberto Harrison is the author of the poetry collections Os (subpress, 2006), Counter Daemons (Litmus Press, 2006), and bicycle(Noemi Press, 2015), as well as of many poetry chapbooks. He edits the Bronze Skull Press chapbook series and is also a visual artist. He lives in Milwaukee.

Paul Martinez-Pompa is the author of Pepper Spray (chapbook) and My Kill Adore Him, which won the Andres Montoya Poetry Prize. He earned degrees from the University of Chicago and Indiana University, where he served as a poetry editor for Indiana Review. His poetry and prose have appeared in various journals and anthologies, and he is a recent recipient of an Illinois Arts Council award. He is now an editor for Packingtown Review, and he teaches rhetoric, poetry and creative writing at Triton College in River Grove, Illinois.

Dutch bassist Albert Wildeman relocated to Chicago in 2011 to pursue improvised music, and has since performed with musicians including Fred Lonberg-Holm, Frank Rosaly, Carol Genetti, Dave Rempis, Tim Daisy, Tony Malaby, Jeb Bishop, Katherine Young, Mars Williams, Ryan Packard, Ståle Liavik Solberg, Avreeayl Ra, Michael Zerang, Jim Baker, Jason Roebke, Juozas Kuraitis, Keefe Jackson, Nick Mazzarella, John Niekrasz and Guillermo Gregorio. In addition, he co-host and curates the Splice Series with Peter Maunu, aiming to present and bring together a wide range of approaches to improvised music and performance.

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Carol Barreto / Damon Locks

Artist Talks on Brazilian Black Feminist Fashion and Freedom/Time (Animation from Stateville Correctional Center)

On Wednesday March 30th, Carol Barreto and Damon Locks will give artist talks. Doors open at 6:30 pm. This event is free.

Carol Barreto is a black feminist fashion designer from Salvador, Bahia, Brasil whose work, both academic and as fashion designer, promotes a feminist, anti-racist and queer discourse. Through her creative work and administration of the brand that carries her name and political ideas, the clothes that she designs focuses on the creation of images aiming toward a more conscious communication to be linked to fashion consumption. Barreto will be speaking about her work in relation to the Afro-Brazilian cultural context of Salvador, and showing recent designs that have been developed from this research.

Carol Barreto’s trip to Chicago was made possible through Harmonipan-Flotar, in partnership with Perto de Lá.

Damon Locks is an artist, musician, educator, deejay who will talk about his practice using some of the tools of his trade. He will discuss the hurdles of art making in these times of racial tumult. He will be presenting a version of his audio piece Sounds Like Now. For centuries Black people have been decrying this omnipresent system of oppression. The struggle for justice and freedom continues. The volume increases as a result of monthly, weekly, and daily examples of the expendability of Black people. Sounds Like Now utilizes records, samples, instruments, and voice in order to hear the past in present tense. He will also be showing/discussing the piece Freedom/Time, an animation project created in  with incarcerated artists that were a part of the Prison and Neighborhood Arts class.

Artist Bios:

Carol Barreto teaches undergraduate and postgraduate courses in Fashion Design and professor of the un-dergraduate Gender and Diversity Studies course of Federal University of Bahia, PhD student in the Multidisciplinary Graduate Program in Culture and Society – PosCultura – UFBA. Her first runway show was in 2001. In 2007, she completed a master’s degree in Design and Culture. Since then, she has worked as professor, designer and businesswoman. In 2010, her brand was re-structured for commercially purposes, like launching a website, opening the first atelier and store. At 2013 Carol Barreto was invited to represent Brazil in Dakar Fashion Week Senegal, an international event gathering fashion designers from different nationalities who express the cultural diversity of their country. In that visit to the African continent, she had the opportunity to gather multiethnic references that are now announced in her collections. Until now, Carol Barreto has shown collections on varios themes as gender, race, ethnicity and sexuality to discuss and promote the black women culture in Brasil. The Carol Barreto brand has as its strongest features precise fittings, geometrical designs in color blocks, bold and futuristic imagery. It focuses in women who are young in soul, who are interested in costume that transmits their personal vision and personality. The VOZES collection evokes a debate about post-colonialism and questions: What does it mean to be the product of a country that was colonized? What identity features can be interpreted as subalternity or resistance? The VOZES collection features the nobility of handicraft, from practice to the concept of appropriation and resistance, materialized in a vivid and multicolored color palette that contemplates Brazilianness and ancestry from the following perspective: OTHER VOICES.

Damon Locks is a visual artist and vocalist/musician operating in the Chicago area since 1988. As a visual artist he began his schooling at SVA in NYC as an illustration major. He transferred to The School of The Art Institute in Chicago where he received his BFA in Fine Arts. In late 80’s he formed as vocalist and percussionist of the punk band Trenchmouth, whom toured the U.S. and internationally for 7 years. In the 90’s, he formed the avant-garde The Eternals with whom he still plays with. After the turn of the century he also began to perform as a vocalist and sampler operator in Rob Mazurek’s jazz group the Exploding Star Orchestra. He regularly creates music as an improvisor in different ensembles and deejays a monthly night. A printmaker at heart he uses the medium that suits the situation best whether it be screen print, digital print, photography, paint, pencil, teaching, drum machine, sampler, kalimba, melodica or vinyl records. He has been know to say that his art is communicating and the medium is less the focus. As time marches on he has become more invested in creating art that inhabits the spaces that intersect with the concerns of surviving contemporary culture. In recent years, he has been lending his artistic and/or teaching talents to organizations such as Prisons and Neighborhood Arts Project, Art Reach, the Center for Urban Pedagogy, the Jane Addams Hull House Museum and teaching at UIC. The collaborations have allowed him to explore more directly engaged ways of making work. Recent recipient of the Helen Coburn Meier and Tim Meier Achievement Award in the Arts and a residency at The New Quorum.

 

Tempestarii HIRES

Prelude: The Breath of Charybdis / Maar / Tempestarii / Yannick Franck

Closing for Bleeding Black Noise

On Friday, March 11th from 7-10 pm, (Doors open @ 6:30pm) The Green Lantern Press is pleased to present a 4-part closing ceremony for BLEEDING BLACK NOISE exhibition, with light and sound stimulations at Sector 2337 (2337 N Milwaukee Ave., Chicago IL 60647.)

Part I: video screening — Prelude: The Breath of Charybdis (Semiconductor, Jon Cates, and Aldo Tambellini)
Part II: sound performance — Maar (Joseph Clayton Mills & Michael Vallera)
Part III: video screening — Tempestarii (Gast Bouschet & Nadine Hilbert, with music by Stephen O’Malley)
Part IV: sound performance — Yannick Franck

Prelude: The Breath of Charybdis

20Hz (Semiconductor, 2011, 5:00)

ERRORRUNNINGWWWATERNOISES [RE:MIXXX] (Jon Cates, 2012, 6:45)

CLONE [excerpt] (Aldo Tambellini, 1976, 10:00)

There is a tale from Aristotle’s Meteorologica that recounts the origin of the mountains. It begins with Charybdis, the daughter of Poseidon “God of the Sea.” Charybdis lives within the ocean, where her exhalations and inhalations cause the tides to rise and fall. When she took her first gulp, the sea drew back and exposed the earth. Charybdis captures and releases: revealing and concealing perceivable worlds. This mythical figure also appears in Homer’s Odyssey, where she takes the form of a whirlpool located within the Strait of Messina and threatens to swallow Odysseus’s ship whole. Later, Edgar Allen Poe encounters a similar phenomenon off the Norwegian coast in A Descent into the Maelström: a terrific spinning funnel of smooth, shining, jet-black water that descends at a forty-five degree angle to an unperceivable depth; its edges are lined in a gleaming vaporous spray; the teeth of its tempest winds emit a shrieking roar. // Prelude: The Breath of Charybdis draws upon the accounts of these poets and philosophers to evoke a dynamic environment. It is not the embodied Charybdis that this program seeks to present, but rather a manifestation of her inspiration.

Tempestarii

Tempestarii (Gast Bouschet & Nadine Hilbert, with music by Stephen O’Malley 2013-C, 39:00)

Dawn spreads its luminous rays across the coast of Iceland, to reveal a sorcerer standing between wine-dark sea and mountainous black rock. He is tempestarii, a figure of medieval lore, undertaking a primitive rite manifested to conjure a storm. The tides of the deep ocean breathe heavily rising and falling across the cinema screen with amplifying power, as the weather-maker beats a mysterious sack against the monolithic cliffs with powerful repetition. // As a magical tool, this sack contains forceful winds pulled from each corner of world. As an analogy, it is aligned with the revolutionary transformations of nature by water, air, solar radiation, and geological shifts and filled with the vast potential of man’s will in alliance with Nature. As an omen, the tempestarii signals profound change on both physical and metaphysical realms. // By demonstrating contemporary art as meteorological sorcery and political activism, the duo Gast Bouschet and Nadine Hilbert raise a storm and blacken the air.

Maar

Maar is Joseph Clayton Mills and Michael Vallera, a pair of polymaths who have each had hands in some of Chicago’s most affecting experimental music. In his solo work and with the group Cleared, Vallera (who’s also a photographer) uses strong rhythmic and melodic structures to frame grainy, amorphous sounds that evoke both apprehension and nostalgia. A member of Haptic and Partial, Mills is also an author and a coproprietor of the Suppedaneum label, which pushes the boundaries of notation and interpretation; for his recent CD-R SIFR, for example, seven different composers wrote or drew scores in response to his arrhythmic, woody percussion and transient electronic tones. Maar’s own recordings are artifacts of a process in which each player adds layers to the other’s recordings, and both contribute fragmented instrumentals, abraded drones, mechanical pulsations, and flickering electronic textures.” — Bill Meyer

Yannick Franck

Yannick Frank is a Belgium-based sound artist, performer, and curator. He is the Artistic Director of the art center Les Brasseurs in Liège, Belgium, and owns the record label Idiosyncratics. Additionally he is part of the industrial-noise duo Orphan Swords and founder of electroacoustic improvisation combo Y.E.R.M.O., which, among others, provided the sound for Gast Bouschet and Nadine Hilbert’s exhibition in the Pavilion of Luxembourg at the Venice Biennial in 2009. // On this occasion he will present a sound performance where experimental vocal techniques, field recordings and textural researches collide into a trance-inducing journey.

 

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Paul Drueke / Chuck Stebelton / Margaret Noodin

On Thursday March 10th, Paul Drueke, Chuck Stebelton, Margaret Noodin will give readings. Doors open at 6:30 pm. This event is free.

Paul Druecke has published two books with Green Gallery Press: Life and Death on the Bluffs (2014), and The Last Days of John Budgen Jr. (2010). Druecke’s work was included in the 2014 Whitney Biennial. His Social Event Archive will be exhibited at the Milwaukee Art Museum in 2016 in conjunction with the project’s 20th anniversary. A co-authored discussion of his work will be included in the forthcoming Blackwell Companion to Public Art. Druecke has worked with the Whitney Museum of American Art, NYC; Marlborough Chelsea, NYC; Kölnischer Kunstverein, Cologne; Lynden Sculpture Garden, Milwaukee; The Suburban, Chicago; Outpost for Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; Many Mini Residency, Berlin; Green Gallery, Milwaukee; and the Contemporary Art Museum Houston among other venues.

Chuck Stebelton is author of two full-length collections of poetry, most recently The Platformist (Cultural Society, 2012). His first book Circulation Flowers (Tougher Disguises, 2005) was winner of the inaugural Jack Spicer Award. Recent print objects include Morning Dub and A Southern Exposure (Lynden Sculpture Garden, 2015 / 2014); Keep (Portrait Society Gallery, 2014); and ‘Tis (Wisconsin Triennial, 2010 / John Riepenhoff Experience, 2009). As a birder and Wisconsin Master Naturalist volunteer he has offered interpretive hikes for organizations including Lynden Sculpture Garden, Woodland Pattern Book Center, and Friends of Lorine Niedecker. He works as Literary Program Director at Woodland Pattern Book Center in Milwaukee.

Margaret Noodin received an MFA in Creative Writing and a PhD in English and Linguistics from the University of Minnesota. She is currently an Assistant Professor at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee where she also serves at the Director of the Electa Quinney Institute for American Indian Education. She is the author of Bawaajimo: A Dialect of Dreams in Anishinaabe Language and Literature and Weweni, a collection of bilingual poems in Ojibwe and English. Her poems and essays have been anthologized and published in Sing: Poetry from the Indigenous Americas, The Michigan Quarterly Review, Water Stone Review, and Yellow Medicine Review. With her daughters, Shannon and Fionna, she is a member of Miskwaasining Nagamojig (the Swamp Singers) a women’s hand drum group whose lyrics are all in Anishinaabemowin (Ojibwe).  To see and hear current projects visit www.ojibwe.net where she and other students and speakers of Ojibwe have created a space for language to be shared by academics and the native community.

40th NC still

Noise Crush / The Fortieth Day / Aldo Tambellini

Noise Crush + The Fortieth Day  is a live performance collaboration between video artist Lisa Slodki and electronic band The Fortieth Day. Opening the performance will be a virtually transmitted poetry reading by Aldo Tambellini. This event is organized in conjunction with Bleeding Black Noise, a group exhibition in Sector 2337’s project space from Feb 12-March 11, 2016.

Lisa Slodki creates real-time performances and installations, often working in collaboration with the Chicago experimental audio and noise communities. Performing with The Fortieth Day under her Noise Crush moniker, Slodki generates VHS tape loops which are mixed live through a battery of VCRs to construct evolving projected superimpositions. Pulsating light of decaying VHS tape and manipulated found footage conjure familiar yet indiscernible images, and the fragility and resilience of both medium and perception. noisecrush.com

The Fortieth Day is the duo of Isidro Reyes and Mark Solotroff, both key players in the heavy-electronics outfit BLOODYMINDED, a band known for its aggressive and confrontational live shows. Solotroff is also known as the vocalist in the doom/shoegaze band Anatomy of Habit. In The Fortieth Day, Reyes and Solotroff utilize guitar, bass, drum machine, and analog synthesizer to create epic, blackened, psychedelic-industrial drone soundscapes, likened to “sustained, withering blasts of high-pitched noise that are as distinct from one another as spotlights sweeping across the night sky; jackhammer clatter, jet-engine whines, and forlorn keyboard melodies dart in and out of those huge sounds with the grace and impunity of plovers picking a crocodile’s teeth”  — Bill Meyer, Chicago Reader  http://www.last.fm/music/The+Fortieth+Day

Aldo Tambellini (based in Cambridge, MA) is an experimental artist working in performance, film, video, sound, painting, sculpture, and poetry. He is perhaps best known for his explorations of black, the color and surrounding concepts, and his electromedia performances. In the early 60s, he was a founding member of the counter-culture group Group Center and worked closely N.H. Pritchard, Ishmael Reed, Carla Black, and the Umbra poetry collective to create intermedia events—combining poetry, jazz, photography, choreography, and film-making. In the 60s, these events evolved into electromedia events, such as Black Zero (The Bridge, 1965; Intermedia ‘68 at Brooklyn Academy of Music; Performa 2009; Tate Modern, 2012) where he collaborated with Benn Morea, Ron Hahne, Elsa Tambellini, Bill Dixon, Alan Silva, and Calvin C. Herton, and the founding of The Black Gate Theater (1967).

 

MRB Chelko / Anthony Madrid / Sarah Stickney

On Saturday February 20th MRB Chelko, Anthony Madrid, and Sarah Stickney will give readings. Doors open at 6:30 pm. This event is free.

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MRB Chelko is the recipient of a Poetry Society of America Chapbook Fellowship for Manhattations (PSA, 2014). A faculty mentor in the low-residency MFA program of The New Hampshire Institute of Art, Chelko also serves as associate editor of the unbound journal Tuesday; An Art Project. Her recent work appears in current or forthcoming issues of Black Warrior Review, Cincinnati Review, Crazyhorse, Slice, Poetry International and other journals. She lives in New York City with her husband and three-year-old daughter. 

Madrid

Anthony Madrid lives in Chicago. His poems have appeared in Best American Poetry 2013, Boston Review, Fence, Harvard Review, Lana Turner, LIT, and Poetry. His first book is called I AM YOUR SLAVE NOW DO WHAT I SAY (Canarium Books, 2012).

Stickney

Sarah Stickney is a former Fulbright Grantee for the translation of Italian/Albanian poet Gëzim Hajdari. Her co-translations of Elisa Biagini’s selected poems, The Guest in the Wood, received the Best Translated Book Award for poetry in 2014. Her poems and translations have appeared both in the U.S. and abroad in publications such as La Questione Romantica, Rhino, The Portland Review, Drunken Boat, Mudlark, The Notre Dame Review, Structo and others. She lives in Annapolis, MD, where she teaches at St. John’s College.

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Saturday Performances

From The Sea is Represented by an Irregular Shape

On Saturdays between February 13th and March 12th at 2:30pm, Mark Booth, along with visiting artists, will present his opera The Sea is Represented by an Irregular Shape. Doors open at 2:00 pm. This event is free.

This performative installation is produced by The Green Lantern Press as part of IN>TIME 2016, a Winter Long, City Wide, Multi Venue Performance Festival for Chicago (January 29th – March 4th).

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As part of Mark Booth’s installation, The Sea is Represented by an Irregular Shape, Sector 2337 is proud to present a series of performances of the work featuring various artists from Chicago and across the United States. Each Saturday’s performance begins at 2:30 and continues until read through a selection of the chain of Booth’s entangled metaphors. In keeping with the construction of the work, each Saturday a longer chain of metaphors is read, so the performance slowly grows from an hour to six hours through February and March. Backed by musicians, singers, shape arrangers, and shape creaters, as the constantly changing performers read their way through the metaphors the supreme stillness of Booth’s formal decisions highlight the work’s strangely conscious inward movement. Cosmic in scope and stoic in its ethics, The Sea is Represented by an Irregular Shape is an opera for our ecological age.

Approximate Run Times:

February 13th: 2:30-3:30 pm

February 20th: 2:30-4:30 pm

February 27th: 2:30-5:30 pm

March 5th: 2:30-7:00 pm

March 12th: 2:30-8:00 pm

Mark Booth is an interdisciplinary artist, sound artist, writer, and musician. His work in text, image, and sound explores the material qualities of language, as well as the ways that language functions (and does not function) to describe human experience. Having learned to read and navigate the world as a dyslexic, Booth uses his work to make sense of his own disjointed experience with words and meaning. His art is simultaneously grandiose in scope (attempting (and failing, of course) to describe the entire spectrum of human existence) and comically quotidian. Booth is on the faculty of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. He has exhibited and performed his work in Chicago, nationally, and internationally in a variety of known and obscure venues.

The 4th edition of IN>TIME Festival is a convergence of performance practices in Chicago. IN>TIME collaborates with 18 venues that range from museum to gallery to DIY spaces. It is borne from deep engagement: engagement with local performance practices, with friends and artists internationally, with structures and concepts of performance itself. It has evolved from a biennial to a triennial festival, encompassing venues all over Chicago, and pieces ranging from dance to performance art to experimental theatre. It’s IN>TIME because it comes just in the dead of winter, when things seem bleakest; because it provides a snapshot of what is happening in contemporary performance right now; because performance is a time-based medium that required that we all be present with one another. IN>TIME is a coming together for a moment within performance.

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MAKE Issue #16: ARCHIVE Event

Come to Sector 2337 on Wednesday, December 16th at 7:00 pm to hear contributors Sooze Lanier, Eileen Mueller (whose untitled image from The Hikers is seen above), Eric Plattner, and Bill Savage read/perform/discuss their works—all of which use photos/images/visual elements—for this issue.

~Historical contexts

~How we document our lives

~Our culture in a digital age

~Translation between language & artistic mediums

All this & more is in MAKE #16: The ARCHIVE issue! http://makemag.com/

 

 

SOOZE LANIER is a writer and maniac living in Chicago. Her debut collection of short stories, The Game We Play, was published by Curbside Splendor in 2014. Lanier’s work can also be found in Annalemma, Hobart, The Spoiler’s Hand and elsewhere.

EILEEN MUELLER studied at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Her work has been featured at Higher Pictures in New York, NY; The Pitch Project in Milwaukee, WI; the OSU Urban Arts Space in Columbus, OH; the Museum of Contemporary Photography and at the Andrew Rafacz Gallery in Chicago.

ERIC PLATTNER lives & walks in Chicago. He’s already missing the next lost thing.

BILL SAVAGE teaches Chicago history, literature, and culture at Northwestern University and the Newberry Library. He believes that Daniel Burnham is overrated, while Edward Brennan is underrated. He is at work on a book about Chicago’s street grid. Savage is a lifelong resident of Chicago’s Rogers Park neighborhood

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Interference / The Gunfight / Figures of Speech (re-visited) / The Birth of the Poet

Festival of Poets Theater: Night 4

Between December 2nd and December 5th Green Lantern Press and Kenning Editions–with support from Poets and Writers–will present a Festival of Poets Theater. The festival features 3-4 events each evening beginning at 7pm and a symposium on Saturday afternoon beginning at 2:30pm. All events are free.

Partial Schedule / Order Subject to Change

6:30 pm Interference is a remote controlled performance piece by Patrick Durgin taking cues from Scott Burton’s infamous “Behavior Tableaux.” See if you can find it.

7:00 pm In The Gunfight, by Brent Cunningham, a war of weapons between The Kid and Tex turns into a war of words, then into a war of words about words, then–almost thankfully–back into a war of weapons.  The Gunfight was originally performed as part of Poets Theater at Small Press Traffic in 2007 with Dan Fisher as The Kid, Lauren Shufran as Tex, and Brandon Brown as the Sheriff. Since then it has been performed at the Yockadot Poetics Theater Festival (2007) and at The Rogue Theater in Tucson, Arizona as part of the University of Arizona Poetry Center’s Poetry Off the Page Event (2012).

7:30 pm Figures of Speech and Figures of Thought (re-visited): Encounters from David Antin’s 80 Langdon Street talk re-performed // David Antin’s aborted talk piece “Figures of Speech and Figures of Thought” was originally presented in May 1978 as part of the “Talk” series poet Bob Perelman ran at the San Francisco art space 80 Langdon Street. Approximating the spatial and temporal conditions of the original event, Ira S. Murfin, together with the audience, re-performs transcribed audio recordings of those moments when the talk was diverted from its intended format by audience intervention. In general, Antin’s talk poems begin as extemporaneous lectures before live audiences that are then recorded, transcribed, edited and published as poetry. In this case, key members of the audience at 80 Langdon, including poet Ron Silliman, Perelman, and Antin’s wife, the artist Eleanor Antin, intervened in Antin’s talk to debate the limits of the performance as an artwork, who controls when, or if, the talk would become a poem, and what it would ultimately include. Though the talk piece itself was never published, accounts of the incident have appeared from Antin, Perelman, and the artist Ellen Zweig, who was in the audience. Murfin resumes the interrupted process of entextualization and uses that material to re-inhabit the parts of the performance when its monologic status was dialogically called into question. Using simple tools and a shared occasion, Murfin facilitates a re-performance that gives Antin’s self-reflexive unpublished talk a new temporal, voiced, and embodied life in the present and off the page.

8:30 pm The Birth of the Poet, directed by Richard Foreman, is a production of a play written by downtown legend Kathy Acker, with music by Peter Gordon and sets by David Salle. Part of 1985’s Next Wave Festival, The Birth of the Poet was reviled at its premiere: the audience (those who hadn’t already walked out) barraged the actors with boos, and the next day’s reviews unanimously echoed the audience’s rage. The Birth of the Poet is still considered one of the most panned shows of the Next Wave. (From BAM blog)

Partial Biographies

 

Brent Cunningham is a writer, publisher and visual artist living in Oakland, California. He has published two books of poetry, Bird & Forest (Ugly Duckling Presse, 2005) and Journey to the Sun (Atelos, 2012). He currently works as the Operations Director at Small Press Distribution in Berkeley. Along with Kevin Killian, Camille Roy, and Elizabeth Treadwell he was one of the founders of the Poets Theater festival at Small Press Traffic in San Francisco, which has been running annually since 2001. He and Neil Alger are the co-founders of Hooke Press, a chapbook press dedicated to publishing short runs of poetry, criticism, theory, writing and ephemera. For longer than any writer should ever, ever admit, he has been working on a novel.

Patrick Durgin is the author of PQRS (2013), The Route (2008, with Jen Hofer), Color Music (2002), and Imitation Poems (2006). His artist books are Singles (2014) and Daughter (2013). He edited the selected works of Hannah Weiner as Hannah Weiner’s Open House and is currently writing a book about Weiner’s life and career, entitled Useful Information. He teaches in three departments of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Ira S. Murfin is a writer, theatre artist and scholar completing a doctoral dissertation, Talk Performance: Artistic Discipline, Extemporaneous Speech, and Media in the Post-1960s American Avant-garde, in the Interdisciplinary PhD in Theatre & Drama at Northwestern University. His artistic and academic work focuses on the relationship between talk, text, and the performance event. Criticism and scholarship has appeared in Theatre Topics, Theatre Journal, Theatre Research International, Review of Contemporary Fiction, and Chicago Arts Journal. Solo and collaborative performance work has been seen at MCA Chicago, Links Hall, Rhinoceros Theatre Festival, Sector 2337, and Chicago Cultural Center, among other venues. In addition, Ira makes work with two theatrical laboratories: The Laboratory for Enthusiastic Collaboration and the Laboratory for the Development of Substitute Materials. He is currently a Chicago Shakespeare Theatre PreAmble Lecturer, Performance Editor for the literary journal Requited, and the Graduate Assistant in Public Humanities with the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities at Northwestern.

 

Poets theater is a genre of porous borders, one that emerges about the same time, and involving many of the same artists, as performance art, performance poetry (“spoken word”), conceptual and “intermedia” art. But poets have long been playwrights, either primarily (Sophocles, Shakespeare) or as a platform for postmodern literary experimentation (the operas and page plays of Gertrude Stein, for example). The Festival of Poets Theater will feature performances, screenings and readings over four nights, plus an afternoon of talks on the genre and salient examples of it. The festival is curated by Devin King and Patrick Durgin.

 

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Towards a Poets Theater / Capturing the Scene of Baraka / Just People

Festival of Poets Theater: Day 4

Between December 2nd and December 5th Green Lantern Press and Kenning Editions–with support from Poets and Writers–will present a Festival of Poets Theater. The festival features 3-4 events each evening beginning at 7pm and a symposium on Saturday afternoon beginning at 2:30pm. All events are free.

Partial Schedule / Order Subject to Change

Saturday December 5th

2:30 pm Carla Harryman’s talk, Towards a Poets Theater, will approach Poets Theater from the perspective of a practitioner, focusing on full-length works since 2000 that explore polyvocality, bilingual translation, interdisciplinary collaboration, sound-text experiment, multi-authorship, site and physical context in the realization of non/narrative “poetic” plays. These works include “Performing Objects Stationed in the Sub World,” “Mirror Play,” “Sue,” and “Gardener of Stars, the Opera,” most of which are written as autonomous text that are radically open to interpretation by any given performing group. Harryman will also give a brief account of the “language-centered” Bay Area Poets Theater from the late 1970’s through mid 1980’s to establish a context for the development of later works, and to show the potential of a yet-to-be fully realized theater within and beyond her own practice.

3:15 pm Heidi R. Bean’s talk: Capturing the Scene of Amiri Baraka’s Home on the Range: In 1968 Amiri Baraka’s play Home on the Range seemed destined for an auspicious career. Despite being a strange little one-act in which the white characters speak in what one prominent critic deemed “unintelligible gibberish,” it toured nationally, played before an audience of 2600 as part of a high-profile Black Panther benefit that was widely covered by the media, and was published in the celebrated 1968 Black Theatre issue of The Drama Review. And yet the play soon fell into obscurity, with no productions on record after 1970 and no reprint for thirty years. So what happened? More than most plays, this talk argues, Home on the Range enjoyed a moment precisely because it captured a scene. It was both product and victim of its own competing interests—a clash of pro-textual avant-garde poetics, anti-textual performativity associated with American theater of the 1960s, Black Nationalist ideology, and the emerging sense of cultural performativity Baraka championed, all coming together at a particularly activist moment in African American cultural history.  

3:45 John Beer’s talk: “Just People”: The Actor in Poets’ Theatre: David Buuck, in his “Some Remarks on Poets Theater,” characterizes the form as “Anti illusionism…”Actors” are not their roles but just people (or, if you can’t get any people, poets.)” Buuck’s remark (which seems accurate as a characterization of at least one major strand of poets’ theater) recalls the longstanding avant-garde goal of abolishing the boundary between life and art. It also seems an instance, or perhaps better an effect, of what Martin Puchner has characterized as “the constitutive anti-theatrical dynamic within modernism.” What’s at stake in the effacement of the actor in this theater? How might that shape the relation of poets’ theater to other forms of theatrical experimentation? I’ll think through these questions with reference to texts and performances of texts by Gertrude Stein, Ntozake Shange, Rodrigo Toscano, and Richard Maxwell.

 

Heidi R. Bean is Assistant Professor of English (specializing in modern and contemporary drama) at Bridgewater State University. She is co-editor, with Mike Chasar, of Poetry after Cultural Studies (University of Iowa Press, 2011) and co-editor, with Laura Hinton, of a special issue of Postmodern Culture devoted to the topic of poets theater since the 1960s. She has published articles, reviews, and interviews at the intersection of poetry and theater in a number of journals, and her account of Bunny Lang’s work with the Poets’ Theatre in the 1950s is forthcoming in Beat Drama: Playwrights and Performances of the “Howl” Generation, edited by Deborah Geis (Methuen). She is currently at work on a critical history of American poets theater since WWII.

John Beer is the author of the poetry collection The Waste Land and Other Poems (2010), winner of the Norma Farber First Book Award from the Poetry Society of America, and the chapbook Lucinda (2013). A former theater critic for Time Out Chicago, Beer’s criticism has appeared in Verse, the Denver Quarterly, Chicago Review, and other magazines. He currently teaches at Portland State University.

 

Carla Harryman is an innovator in interdisciplinary performance, poetry, and prose. She has authored seventeen books including W— /M— (2013), Adorno’s Noise (2008), Memory Play (1994) Animal Instincts: Prose, Plays, Essays (1989) and the multi-authored work The Grand Piano, an Experiment in Autobiography: San Francisco, 1975-1980. Open Box (with Jon Raskin), a CD of music and text performances was released on the Tzadik label in 2012. Her Poets Theater, interdisciplinary, and bi-lingual performances have been presented nationally and internationally and have been featured at the Hölderlinturm, Université de Montréal, and the Wels Music Festival, Austria. Over the past ten years, her work has increasingly emphasized music-text collaboration and bilingual performance. Recent performances include the work-in-progress “Gardener of Stars, the Opera” presented with Jon Raskin at &NOW 2015 Festival at Cal Arts; “Open Box” and “Disk” presented at the San Francisco Outsound Music Festival (with Gino Robair and Jon Raskin, 2012), new work for speaking voices and instruments at The Center for New Music, San Francisco (2013), “Mirror Play” performed as a dialogue in Czech and English (Prague Micro-festival, 2011), and Occupying Theodore W. Adorno’s “Music and New Music,” a keynote lecture-performance (with pianist Magda Mayas) presented at dOCUMENTA 13 (2012). In addition to “Gardener of Stars, the Opera,” she is currently writing a new work for Poets Theater, “Two Hannahs,” that, focused in feminism, explores the concept of global culture shock. She serves on the faculty of Eastern Michigan University interdisciplinary creative writing program and on the summer faculty for the MFA program of the Milton Avery School of the Arts at Bard College.

Poets theater is a genre of porous borders, one that emerges about the same time, and involving many of the same artists, as performance art, performance poetry (“spoken word”), conceptual and “intermedia” art. But poets have long been playwrights, either primarily (Sophocles, Shakespeare) or as a platform for postmodern literary experimentation (the operas and page plays of Gertrude Stein, for example). The Festival of Poets Theater will feature performances, screenings and readings over four nights, plus an afternoon of talks on the genre and salient examples of it. The festival is curated by Devin King and Patrick Durgin.

 

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Nero's Ghosts / Home on the Range / The Arm Collector

Festival of Poets Theater: Night 3

Between December 2nd and December 5th Green Lantern Press and Kenning Editions–with support from Poets and Writers–will present a Festival of Poets Theater. The festival features 3-4 events each evening beginning at 7pm and a symposium on Saturday afternoon beginning at 2:30pm. All events are free.

Friday, December 4th

7:00 pm Nero’s Ghosts is a combination of translations of Seneca by Kristina Chew and John Tipton. As a pre-eminent stoic philosopher focused on small acts of impoverished virtue who lived a life of opulence as an advisor to the hedonistic Nero, Seneca’s contradictions mark him as one of the great representatives of Roman life. While his philosophical influence can be tracked in Dante and Montaigne, amongst others, his work as a playwright looms large over Renaissance theater. Seneca’s plays—updates of Greek myths that are generally assumed to have been written to be recited amongst friends in a salon environment—are strange, tortured works of heavy violence and psychological turmoil. This performance takes as its beginning a scene between Nero and Seneca himself from Octavia—a play long attributed to Seneca but now known to be written by someone else—and moves to combine sections from a few of Seneca’s different works. Reminiscent of 1001 Nights—though trading a bedroom setting for a sterile office—this performance reflects upon how myth interprets and fulfills state sanctioned bodily harm.

7:45 pm In his directorial debut, poet/performer avery r. young explores light, sound and language in the late Amiri Baraka’s play, Home On the Range. Within an evening of watching television, a family is confronted by an intruder. In this interactive presentation, young will rely on both performer and audience in this inspection of stereotypes, imagery and sonic shifting. Co-presented by the Red Rover Series with performers: Dan Godston, Shadell Jamison, Jennifer Karmin, Kortney Morrow, Analeah Rosen, and Nate Russell.

8:30 pm The Arm Collector by TRAUMA DOG (Cassandra Troyan & Rachel Ellison) is a stage for uncovering the erotics of competitive objectification. We prepare for battle; on the pole, in the octagon, on the field, in the air, in the wilderness. Self-realization, attained by victory and satisfaction, is enacting on this terrain of desirous drama. 1: “It’s like anything else: I’ve done all of my life. I would never stop training no matter what.” 2: “The environment is perfect for celebrating. Plenty of room to sit and great view from all directions.” 1: “Put that together…it hits you a lot.” 2: “The dancers were high energy and very good at their routine.” 1: “You don’t want to hear the critics sometimes but still — I’m a sensitive guy and it still hits you, hits you and you are never good enough.” 2: “Doors open at 7 pm. Bring extra dollars for the men, they are very entertaining and real gentlemen. The drinks are great and the talent is so adorable.”

Rachel Ellison is an artist, writer, and sculptor of experiences based in Chicago. Rachel creates performance-events called Rehearsals for Ways of Being using strategies to rethink, recontextualize, and reperform scenes of everyday life. The performances pull from an evolving register of forms to highlight the significance of gesture, politics of the personal, and fantasy in relation to a multiplicity of subjectivities. They often bring people together in unusual ways to engage, speak, watch, think, and feel. She received her MFA in Visual Arts from the University of Chicago where she met collaborator Cassandra Troyan, the other half of Trauma Dog (formerly known as JIMMYBROOKS). You can find Rachel at rachelellisonhappyforever.com and at @YesJewess.

Devin King is the co-director of Sector 2337 and the poetry editor at Green Lantern Press. He teaches at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

 

John Tipton’s translations include Sophocles’ Ajax and Aeschylus’ Seven against Thebes. A new collection of poems, Paramnesia, is forthcoming from Flood Editions.

Cassandra Troyan is a writer, ex-artist, and pétroleuse whose writing, described by Blake Butler, “takes the Sade-ian end of the oversharing shtick, turning one’s own private human pain into a diorama reflecting the environments and brains that birthed it.” Their work demarcates spaces for experience through exploration of myths, normative (gender) roles, historical legacies, and cultural influence as a means to re-organizing agency in the disorganization of daily life. As a desirous voyeur wanting to reanimate the most gorgeous impulses in the unlikeliest of places, they are a trans-historical operator deriving pleasure and power from situations of submission, violence, labor, queer romance, sex work, horror, and capital. They are the author of THRONE OF BLOOD (Solar Luxuriance, 2013), BLACKEN ME BLACKEN ME, GROWLED (Tiny Hardcore Press, 2014), KILL MANUAL (Artifice Books, 2014) and the chapbook HATRED OF WOMEN (Solar Luxuriance, 2014). Forthcoming in 2016 is a chapbook from Kenning Editions’ Ordinance series, entitled “FREEDOM & PROSTITUTION.” They received their MFA in Visual Arts from the University of Chicago in 2012 and currently live in the bay. http://onemurderleadstoanother.com/

Multidisciplinary artist avery r. young is a 3Arts Award winning teaching-artist, composer and producer with work that spans the genres of music, performance, visual arts and literature. Examining and celebrating Black American history and culture, his work also focuses in the areas of social justice, equity, queer identity, misogyny and body consciousness. As a writer, this Cave Canem alum has work featured The Breakbeat Poets, Coon Bidness, to be left with the body and Make Magazine. He has also written curriculum and essay on arts education which appear in Teaching Artist Journal and A.I.M. Print. Dubbed “sunday mornin jook joint,” his performance and work in sound design merges spiritual and secular aesthetics with dramatic and comedic sensibilities. He has performed in the Hip Hop Theater Festival, Wordstock and Lollapalooza. Has recorded with house producers Anthony Nicholson, Charlie Dark and is featured on recordings such as, New World Reveal-A-Solution, Audio Truism, Catfish Haven’s Devastator and New Skool Poetiks. His new full-length release, booker t. soltreyne: a race rekkid, features songs and other sound designed created during his artist residency with the University of Chicago’s Arts and Public Life initiative. It was during w as as during a during this residency that he worked worked on sound design design and concrete poems called cullud sign(s). Through voice, sound, visual art and performance, young is constantly exploring the forms in which poetry can exist. His work moves through these genres seamlessly and presents a human with multiple identities. He currently is a coach for the youth Poetry Ensemble, Rebirth and working on his first full manuscript of poems.

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The Walmart Republic / El Gato Pussycat Proteja Your Gringo Cheese / Who is React?

Festival of Poets Theater: Night 2

Between December 2nd and December 5th Green Lantern Press and Kenning Editions–with support from Poets and Writers–will present a Festival of Poets Theater. The festival features 3-4 events each evening beginning at 7pm and a symposium on Saturday afternoon beginning at 2:30pm. All events are free.

Thursday, December 3rd

7:00 pm Adaptation of Quraysh Ali Lansana’s book of poems, The Walmart Republic, directed by Emily Hooper Lansana.

7:30 pm El Gato Pussycat Proteja Your Gringo Cheese, a neo-benshi piece by Daniel Borzutzky, investigates manifestations of violence and cultural imperialism on the Southwestern border as depicted in early pop-culture images of Mexicans in and outside of the US.

8:00 pm Who Is React? is an early “Flarf” composition by K. Silem Mohammad, directed for the festival by Sharon Lanza. The Flarf e-mail list, populated by myself, Gary Sullivan, Nada Gordon, Drew Gardner, Sharon Mesmer, Jordan Davis, Katie Degentesh, Maria Damon, and others, was active during the aughts, when we would send poems to each other that we wrote by various methods, most conspicuously by collaging together scraps of language taken from Google search page results. As was typical of these early pieces, the googled language in “React” underwent minimal editing, and great care was taken not to take great care with arrangement, continuity, or coherence. It has been performed at the Small Press Traffic Poets’ Theater Jamboree in 2004 in San Francisco and the first Flarf Festival at the Medicine Show Theater in 2006 in New York City.

Poets theater is a genre of porous borders, one that emerges about the same time, and involving many of the same artists, as performance art, performance poetry (“spoken word”), conceptual and “intermedia” art. But poets have long been playwrights, either primarily (Sophocles, Shakespeare) or as a platform for postmodern literary experimentation (the operas and page plays of Gertrude Stein, for example). The Festival of Poets Theater will feature performances, screenings and readings over four nights, plus an afternoon of talks on the genre and salient examples of it. The festival is curated by Devin King and Patrick Durgin.

Partial Biographies

Daniel Borzutzky is the author of In the Murmurs of the Rotten Carcass Economy (2015), The Book of Interfering Bodies (2011), The Ecstasy of Capitulation (2007) and Arbitrary Tale (2005) His work has been anthologized in, among others, A Best of Fence: The First Nine Years, Seriously Funny, and Malditos Latinos Malditos Sudacas: Poesia Iberoamericana Made in USA. He has also translated books of poetry from Spanish. He lives in Chicago.

 

 

Quraysh Ali Lansana is author of eight poetry books, three textbooks, a children’s book, editor of eight anthologies, and coauthor of a book of pedagogy. He is a faculty member of the Writing Program of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. He is also a former faculty member of the Drama Division of The Juilliard School. Lansana served as Director of the Gwendolyn Brooks Center for Black Literature and Creative Writing at Chicago State University from 2002-2011, where he was also Associate Professor of English/Creative Writing until 2014. Our Difficult Sunlight: A Guide to Poetry, Literacy & Social Justice in Classroom & Community (with Georgia A. Popoff) was published in March 2011 by Teachers & Writers Collaborative and was a 2012 NAACP Image Award nominee. His most recent books include The BreakBeat Poets: New American Poetry in the Age of Hip Hop w/Kevin Coval and Nate Marshall (Haymarket Books, 2015) and The Walmart Republic w/ Christopher Stewart (Mongrel Empire Press, September 2014). Forthcoming titles include The Whiskey of Our Discontent: Gwendolyn Brooks as Conscience and Change Agent (Haymarket Books, 2017) and Revise the Psalm: Poems Inspired by the work of Gwendolyn Brooks (Curbside Splendor, 2017).

K. Silem Mohammad is a professor in the Creative Writing BFA program at the Oregon Center for the Arts at Southern Oregon University. He is the author of several books of poetry, including Deer Head Nation (Tougher Disguises, 2003), Breathalyzer (Edge Books, 2008), and The Front (Roof Books, 2009). He also edits the poetry magazine Abraham Lincoln.

 

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Ordinary Isadora / I Am American : I Speak English / The Adventures of a Nurse

Festival of Poets Theater: Night 1

Between December 2nd and December 5th Green Lantern Press and Kenning Editions—with support from Poets and Writers—will present a Festival of Poets Theater. The festival features 3-4 events each evening beginning at 7pm and a symposium on Saturday afternoon beginning at 2:30pm. All events are free.

Wednesday, December 2nd

7:00 pm Ordinary Isadora: Often called the mother of modern dance, Isadora Duncan is now mostly remembered for her unusual death, her scandalous life, and, perhaps, her outre costuming (Duncan dancers still wear tunics). But Duncan’s dance is built on ordinary movements: walking, skipping, running, as well as moments of interaction–touching, looking, pushing, reaching–between people, objects, and atmospheres within scenes. Her work also asks us to think about the ordinary in historical ways; to think, that is, more deeply about the historicity of bodies developed in Marcel Mauss’s notion of “body techniques.” This performance talk by Ingrid Becker and Hannah Brooks-Motl, currently studying Duncan dance (and in the PhD program in English at the University of Chicago) will address Duncan and ordinariness through both movement and discussion.

7:30 pm I Am American: I Speak English, by Josh Rios and Anthony Romero, explores the historical changes of status certain languages undergo​ in the US​ and the effects this shift has on subsequent generations​​. Translation, multilingualism, interpretation, and mediated events of language acquisition are the ​points from which the performance begins. Language exceeds mere communication; it is a symbol in itself; it is a place of respite, a method of resistance, and a marker of difference. Configured to challenge authenticity as rooted in a way of speaking while lamenting the systematic erasure of native tongues I Am American: I Speak English​ attempts to deal with the ​conditions​ under which​ ways of speaking become​ lost and then found?

8:15 pm Playing with cliched feminine personae, Eleanor Antin in The Adventures of a Nurse (1976)  manipulates cut-out paper dolls to tell the story of innocent Nurse Eleanor who meets one gorgeous, intriguing, and available man after another. Nurse Eleanor is the fantasy creation of Antin, who is costumed as a nurse. Staged on a bedspread and acted by a cast of one, The Adventures of a Nurse moves through successive layers of irony to unravel a childlike, self-enclosed fantasy of a young woman’s life. (Description from Video Data Bank)

Poets theater is a genre of porous borders, one that emerges about the same time, and involving many of the same artists, as performance art, performance poetry (“spoken word”), conceptual and “intermedia” art. But poets have long been playwrights, either primarily (Sophocles, Shakespeare) or as a platform for postmodern literary experimentation (the operas and page plays of Gertrude Stein, for example). The Festival of Poets Theater will feature performances, screenings and readings over four nights, plus an afternoon of talks on the genre and salient examples of it. The festival is curated by Devin King and Patrick Durgin.

Partial Biographies

Eleanor Antin works in photography, video, film, installation, drawing, performance, and writing. Many one-woman exhibitions include the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum and a major retrospective at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art which traveled to St. Louis and toured the UK. As both a performing and exhibiting artist she has appeared in venues around the world including the Venice Biennale, the Sydney Biennale and Opera House and Documenta 12. She has written, directed and produced many videotapes and films, among them the cult feature, “The Man Without a World”, 1991, (Berlin Film Fest., U.S.A. Film Fest., Ghent Film Fest., London Jewish Film Fest, etc.) She is represented by the Ronald Feldman Gallery in New York. Her work is represented in many major public collections including the Art Institute of Chicago, Whitney Museum, Museum of Modern Art, Tate Modern, the Beaubourg, the Verbund Collection, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, etc. She has written 5 books, BEING ANTINOVA (Astro Artz), ELEANORA ANTINOVA PLAYS (Sun & Moon), 100 BOOTS (Running Press), “MAN WITHOUT A WORLD: a Screenplay” (Green Integer, Sun&Moon Press) and most recently “CONVERSATIONS WITH STALIN” (Green Integer). She has just completed a new book “An Artist’s Life by Eleanora Antinova” (to be published by Hirmerverlag, Munich) along with a re-publication of “Being Antinova”. Major monographs on her work include The Los Angeles County Museum of Art, “ELEANOR ANTIN” and “HISTORICAL TAKES” (Prestel) and “MULTIPLE OCCUPANCY: ELEANOR ANTIN’S SELVES” (Columbia University, N.Y.) She received many awards, including a Lifetime Achievement Award in 2006 from the Women’s Caucus of the College Art Association, 2 Best Show AICA Awards (International Assoc. of Art Critics), a Guggenheim Fellowship, the National Foundation for Jewish Culture Media Achievement Award and an honorary doctorate from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She is an emeritus Professor of Visual Arts at the University of California at San Diego.

Ingrid Becker is a graduate student thinking about 20th century American literature and culture at the University of Chicago. Over the last year, she has been rediscovering the relationships between brain and body, sound and gesture, individual and environment through the Duncan Dance tradition.

Hannah Brooks-Motl is the author of the poetry collections The New Years (Rescue Press, 2014) and the forthcoming M (The Song Cave, 2015). She has been studying Duncan Dance in Chicago since October 2014, and has recently started to explore the potential of movement and performance in her own critical and creative practice.

 

Anthony Romero and Josh Rios, both originally from south Texas, now live and work in Chicago. Over the past several years they have been developing various performances, 2 and 3 dimensional works, curatorial projects, installations, writings, and screenings that deal with the key experiences of being Mexican-origin in the US. Broadly speaking, their projects center on contemporary Chicana/o aesthetics, elided histories, and the larger themes of US/Mexico relations. In November they will be artists in residence at Harold Washington College. Their collaborative performances and projects have been most recently featured at the Art Institute of Chicago, the University of Illinois at Chicago, Texas State University, Art in these Times, Sector 2337, and Andrea Meislin Gallery.

 

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Following Nonhuman Kinds: The Plant Symposium

Following Nonhuman Kinds: The Plant Symposium is an interactive program of events dedicated to the strange subjectivity of plants. With lectures, workshops, performances and a screening, this symposium is contextualized by an eight-week group exhibition on the same subject, Imperceptibly and Slowly Opening, at Sector 2337 and produced by The Green Lantern Press. This symposium collectively engages and interacts with themes latent in the surrounding exhibition.
The Program is as follows:
Sat, Nov 7 @ 7-9pm :
Mark Payne, “Before the Law: Crimes Against Trees” (lecture)
Caroline Picard, “Curator Talk on Imperceptibly and Slowly Opening” (lecture)

Mark Payne is Professor in the Department of Classics, the John U. Nef Committee on Social Thought, and the College at the University of Chicago. His first book, Theocritus and the Invention of Fiction, was published by Cambridge University Press in 2007. His second book, The Animal Part: Human and Other Animals in the Poetic Imagination, was published by the University of Chicago Press in 2010 and received the 2011 Warren-Brooks Award for Outstanding Literary Criticism. His current book project, Chorality: On natural appearing, is about Nature as a living presence around human life in Greek poetry and philosophy, German Romanticism, and the Anglo-American weird tale.

Caroline Picard is an artist, writer, publisher, and curator. Her writing has appeared in Artslant, ArtForum.com, Flash Art International, and Paper Monument, among other publications. In 2014 she was the Curatorial Fellow at La Box, ENSA in France, and became a member of the SYNAPSE International Curators’ Network of the Haus der Kulturen der Welt in Berlin in 2015. She is the Executive Director of The Green Lantern Press—a nonprofit publishing house and art producer in operation since 2005—and the Co-Director of Sector 2337, a hybrid artspace/bar/bookstore in Chicago.

Wed, Nov 11 @ 7-9pm:
“Little History of Plant Photography” a lecture by Deanna Ledezma
In his 1861 speech “Pictures and Progress,” Frederick Douglass declared, “Daguerre by the simple but all abounding sunlight has converted the planet into a picture gallery. As munificent in the exalted arena of art, as in the radiation of light and heat, the God of day not only decks the earth with rich fruit and beautiful flowers—but studs the world with pictures.” “Little History of Plant Photography” traces the interactions between two objects dependent upon light for their material existence: photographs and plants. From William Henry Fox Talbot’s photogenic drawings of botanical specimens to Anna Atkins’s cyanotypes of British algae to twentieth-century vernacular photographs of houseplants, this talk presents a history of photography through which plants pervade.
“proposals for practicing unsafe communication: Intimacy, toxicity, urushiol” lecture by Lindsey French
In The Universe of Things, Steven Shaviro suggests that “a feeling always involves some alteration of the one who feels.” In a continuing search for adopting a phytocentric perspective, what role can feeling play, specifically in the negotiations between individual bodies? A broader definition of communication offers the potential to reframe the exchange of chemicals as forms of dialogue with nonhuman others. Looking to urushiol, the active resin in poison ivy which can cause allergic reaction in human skin, what are potential practices of intimacy and vulnerability with vegetal otherness?
Lindsey French is an artist and educator whose work engages in gestures of communication with landscapes and the nonhuman. Embracing a number of mediation strategies, her projects materialize as texts written in collaboration with trees, video performances of attempted dialogues with the landscape, and sound installations of distant and displaced forests. She has shared her work in places such as the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago, the Chicago Cultural Center, the Chicago Perch, the Pico House Gallery in Los Angeles, Flying Object in Hadley, MA and in conjunction with the International Symposium of Electronics Arts in both Albuquerque and Vancouver. Her work has been featured in an essay in Leonardo and discussed on podcasts for Creative Disturbance. French currently teaches courses that explore new media practices and site specific research at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in the Art and Technology Studies, Sculpture, and Contemporary Practices Departments.
Deanna Ledezma is a Ph.D. student in the Art History Department at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). Her research explores turn-of-the-century vernacular photography and the material culture of memory in the United States. Her projects have examined the material practices of photography in the home, hairwork and photographic jewelry, and the transformation of nineteenth-century relics in the work of contemporary artist Dario Robleto. She received her master’s degree in Art History from UIC and undergraduate degrees in Art and English from Texas State University. During her graduate studies, she has held the Abraham Lincoln Fellowship (2011–2012; 2013–2014) and the Diversifying Higher Education Faculty in Illinois (DFI) Fellowship (2014–2015).
Thur, Nov 12 @ 7-9pm:
Artist Talk by Kiam Marcelo Junio 

– “Crypto-Phototropics: A reflection on how plants see, and how they can help us forecast the future of cities and our understanding of culture,” a performance by Sebastian Alvarez

“Why Look at Plants?” a talk by Giovanni Aloi
New definitions of plant intelligence and plant agency have over the past thirty years substantially shifted scientific conceptions of the vegetal world. Yet, a lot more work is needed in order to change attitudes and perspective towards plants in both academic and non academic realms. What challenges are involved in further rethinking animal ontologies? What impact would a different consideration of human-animal-plant relationships have on broader environmental/eco-issues/systems? For the past nine months I have been working on a book titled ‘Why Look at Plants?’ which will focus on contemporary art and the epistemological opportunities that an artistic context could provide to such ontological reconfiguring. The aim of this talk is to discuss, through specific examples, the content of the eight chapters currently planned.
Giovanni Aloi is an art historian in modern and contemporary art specializing in the representation of animals, plants, and environmental concern in the visual realm. He studied History of Art and Art Practice in Milan and then moved to London in 1997 to further his studies at Goldsmiths University where he obtained a Postgraduate Diploma in Art History, a Master in Visual Cultures, and a Doctorate on the subject of natural history in contemporary art. Aloi currently teaches for the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Sotheby’s Institute of Art New York and London and Tate Galleries. He regularly works for radio and TV and also is the Editor in Chief of Antennae, the Journal of Nature in Visual Culture. His first book, Art & Animals, was published in November 2011. Aloi is currently working on two monographs, one on taxidermy in contemporary art and another on plants in contemporary art, both due for publication in 2016.
Born and raised in Lima-Peru, Sebastian Alvarez is an interdisciplinary artist and independent researcher. Working across diverse media, including film, audio, performance, and installation, his artistic practice explores the interrelation and fragmentation of human systems.  He received an MFA in Performance Art from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and has performed, curated, and presented work internationally at such venues and institutions as Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, Museum of Contemporary Art (Chicago), Hyde Park Art Center, Chicago Cultural Center, Whitney Biennial (NYC), Postgarage (Graz, Austria), Townhouse Gallery (Cairo, Egypt), and the Ecole Nationale Supérieure d’Art Bourges (Bourges, France).
Kiam Marcelo Junio (preferred gender pronoun: “they/their/them”) is a Chicago-based interdisciplinary artist creating work through photography, video, installation, performance, and hybrid forms. Their research and art practice centers around queer identities, Philippine history and the Filipino diaspora, American imperialism, the politics of visibility, and social justice through collaborative processes and healing modalities. Kiam served seven years in the US Navy as a Hospital Corpsman. They were born in the Philippines, and have lived in the U.S., Japan, and Spain.
Fri, Nov 13@ 7-9pm:
– “Sleeping with Plants | Golden Chalice and Bronzed Mirrors: an inquiry into the nature of intimacy, skin and scent,” performance/lecture by Elena Ailes
Solandra grandiflora, a psychotropic vine in the Solanaceae family, commonly known as Golden Chalice or Cup of Gold, is found throughout Central America, the Caribbean, and, though specific cultivation as an ornamental garden species, in parts of the southern United States. The orange trumpet flowers smell like coconuts while blooming, filling the air with scent meant to summon the autonomous apparatus that is so necessary to the plant’s ability to reproduce: the pollinator. Honey bee as sex-aid. The massive orange blossoms also happen to release another sort of summons: a chemical identical in structure to human pheromones normally associated with the human reproduction activities of sex and love. The chemical overlap between flower and person articulates a line of accidental familiarity between two distinct kingdoms, in the biological sense, of being. In a (scent) sense, these biological repetitions of form [identical chemical release, identical receptors] are simultaneous summons, scent-based calls to amorous action In this lecture I will explore the temporal differences between plants and humans, the idealistic and mystical desire for elastic intraaction between human and nonhuman forms, and will ultimately focus on what it means to experience intimacy as a being in and of the world. Parts of this lecture will include: the historical use of the medical term ‘vegetative state’ and the pejorative associations with labeling a human vegetable-like, the complicated set of relations that come with the phrase ‘sleeping with’, and ways that humans and non-human alike transgress their supposedly natural rhythmic ‘registers’ out of desire for a new closeness.
– “Tree sex: slowly, imperceptibly kinky,” a presentation by Chuck Cannon
The unusual nature of plant sex and reproduction is generally under-appreciated, primarily because of the time scale upon which it occurs and the ambiguous and anonymous nature of ‘sex’ among plants. Trees in particular remain mysterious and weird, often being trisexual, extremely promiscuous and sexually deprived. I’ll discuss how sexual organs serve as the basis of our understanding of species and how they can be deceptively simple avenues for the exploration of evolutionary potential.
– “A Program for Plants” (APP) 
A Program for Plants takes as its starting point the proposition of programming a video art festival for plants. This multifaceted task prompts a series of parallel pragmatic and philosophical questions which re-purpose Chicago’s Video Data Bank as a vehicle for expanding our capacity to empathize with plants. Collaborators Joshi Radin, Brian M. John, and Linda Tegg will discuss the early stages of their research.
Elena Ailes is interested in both that which makes her a better person and a worse person, especially in theory. In reality, she is an artist and writer living and working in Chicago, IL. Her most recent bodies of work are centered on the physical and art historical relevance of the horizon line and both absolute and relative methods of orienteering. She earned her MFA in Sculpture from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and is currently working towards a MA in Visual Critical Studies, also from SAIC. She was recently the recipient of Edward L Ryerson Fellowship. Solo and two-person exhibitions include Shear Glory, Devotion Gallery, Brooklyn; our empty rooms, Center for Contemporary Arts, Santa Fe, NM; Adore Aderi, Jon Sommers Gallery, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM.
Dr. Chuck Cannon, Director of the Center for Tree Science, brings a broad perspective on forests and all of the things that live in them.  First starting out in 1989 as an undergraduate research assistant to study primate behavior in the equatorial rainforests of Indonesian Borneo, he quickly learned that trees were the most important (and the most poorly understood) element in any forested landscape.  His commitment to tree science has remained firm since that early insight and his work has taken him to over a dozen countries and involved a wide range of scientific endeavors, from basic species description to on-the-ground forest management policy.  He will be leading the many excellent tree scientists at the Arboretum in the shaping and expansion of our knowledge of trees and forests around the world.
Sat, Nov 14 @ 2pm-6pm:
2-3:30pm – “Botanical Photograms Workshop” by Fereshteh Toosi
In the mid 1850s, botanist Anna Atkins used a direct printing method called cyanotype to document the plants she was studying.
During this hands-on workshop, we will use the same techniques, developing our blue prints using just the sun and water. Together we’ll compose images of plant matter and other materials we find during our field trip.
4-6pm – “Attention Feeder Workshop” by the Laboratory for Material Thinking
The Attention Feeder is a two hour collective exercise in prolonged attention.  We will begin by creating a shared vocabulary for use during a series of guided narratives on the interwoven relationship between living, nonliving and human perception, as a way to perceive in less anthropocentric ways.
6:30-7pm  –“havoc and tumbled” a film by era MacKenzie + Andrew Mausert-Mooney

Directors Andrew Mausert-Mooney and Kera MacKenzie and actor Nate Whelden produce live television from one angle and theater from another. Recorded in front of a studio audience during Live to Tape: Artist-Television Festival, May 2015, Chicago, a man attends to the tasks at hand, amidst disruptions. On the other side of the stage/edit: the story of changing American landscapes and the inner character of rare plant life that thrive below telephone lines.

Kera MacKenzie is an interdisciplinary artist exploring the space between moving images, photography, sets and performance. She has screened and exhibited at spaces including the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, the Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago Underground Film Festival, High Concept Laboratories, Links Hall, and the MassArt Film Society. Kera has been an artist in residence at ACRE (Wisconsin) and Culturia (Berlin) and was a participating artist at High Desert Test Sites 2013 (New Mexico). She studied at Bennington College, the Art Institute of Boston, and Transart Institute and received her MFA in Moving Image from the University of Illinois at Chicago. Andrew Mausert-Mooney is a Chicago­-based artist working with 16mm film, video, performance and television. Andrewʼs work has shown in festivals, galleries and exhibition series around the world including the American Film Institute, CineVegas, Threewalls, Chicago Underground Film Festival, Pleasure Dome, The Nightingale, and Other Cinema. He received his MFA from the University of Illinois at Chicago in 2012.  MacKenzie and Mausert-Mooney together founded and co-direct ACRE TV, an artist-made live-streaming tele-vision network. ACRETV.org

The people, places, and things featured in Fereshteh Toosi’s art works include oyster mushrooms used for bioremediation, New Orleans soul
food restaurants, benthic macroinvertebrates, lithium salts, and Persian pickles. Most recently Fereshteh’s work utilizes historical photographic processes and handmade 16mm film. Fereshteh volunteers with the Prison and Neighborhood Arts project and rows with a team on the Chicago River. Learn more about her projects at http://fereshteh.net

The Laboratory for Material Thinking was conceived collaboratively by five individuals who, in our practices and research, share a sense of urgency in re-examining humans’ relationship to nonhuman kinds. Within our group of five core collaborators, our practices encompass art making, writing, education, activism and curating in various combinations. Amber Ginsburg, a lecturer in the Department of Visual Arts at the University of Chicago, would be one University collaborator, with Sara Black (SAIC), Karsten Lund (MCA Chicago), Raewyn Martyn (Antioch College) and Caroline Picard (The Green Lantern Press/Sector 2337) forming the collaborative fellowship team.

Following Nonhuman Kinds, began in Bourges, France in April of 2014, continued in Chicago at Latitude the following September and carried on thereafter at Sector 2337. The hybrid group — at times a symposium, a reading group, workshop, public lectures or artist talks began with an ecological  line of inquiry engaged by artists and intellectuals meeting outside of an institution. The premise is as follows: Everywhere we turn, we find a territory of nonhuman things. It is impossible to escape the material din of others—from material structures: plants, robots, animals and objects, to those all but invisible bodies outside the bounds of human perception: atoms, molecules, pollution, viruses, satellites, planets et al. While humanity has historically identified itself as something categorically separate from the natural world, this amoebic group examines texts, theories, and works of art that challenge the theoretical terms with which we engage our landscape. Following Nonhuman Kinds pursues the complicated strangers among us, ignoring hierarchical conventions in order to reframe and reconsider the interstitial, interspecies web we inhabit. The corresponding Open Group on Facebook is available here.

 

GLP.Nevue_Sutherland_2015

Chantal Neveu + Keston Sutherland

On Friday November 20th at 7pm, Chantal Neveu and Keston Sutherland will give readings. Doors open at 6:30 pm. This event is free.

Chantal Neveu is a francophone writer and an interdisciplinary artist from Montréal, Québec.  She is the author of the books Une Spectaculaire influence (l’Hexagone), coït and mentale   (La Peuplade), Èdres followed by Èdres | Dehors (Éditions É=É), and many interdisciplinary textual projects – solo and into collaborations. A Spectacular Influence is translated from French to English by Nathanaël, and Coït is translated by Angela Carr (both published by BookThug / Toronto). Chantal Neveu is part of the creative-research project Artistic Strategies for Spatializing  Knowledge where she undertakes literary experimentation based on scripting – a method of  notation ‘real time’ notation – which partakes of the passage from the oral to the writen word in favour of research on the mixity of language, a literal and populated poetry.As Conseil des arts et des lettres grants recipient, Chantal Neveu has been Villa Waldberta’s guest in Bavaria (DE), House of Literatures Passa Porta in Brussels (B), Villa Hellebosch in Flanders (B), Subsistances in Lyon (F) and La Chartreuse / CNES in Avignon (F).

Keston Sutherland is the author of The Odes to TL61P, The Stats on Infinity, Stress Position, Hot White Andy, Neocosis and other poems. His Poetical Works 1999-2015 was published in 2015 by Enitharmon. He has published many essays on poetry and on Marx, and a book of literary critical theory, Stupefaction. For the Fall of 2015 he is based at Princeton. His home is in Brighton, UK, where he helps to run the annual Sussex Poetry Festival. He was for many years the editor of Quid and still co-edits Barque Press. He is a silent partner in the stochastic local noise band Michael Gove Meat Platter.

Fereshteh Toosi, LOMT, MacKenzie + Mausert-Mooney

Following Nonhuman Kinds: The Plant Symposium

On Saturday, November 14th from 2-7 pm, Fereshteh Toosi, Laboratory for Material Thinking, Kera MacKenzie and Andrew Mausert-Mooney will present two workshops, and one film. This event is part of a Following Nonhuman Kinds: The Plant Symposium, a series of talks, workshops, and performances that explore vegetal life. A full list of events is available here.
Saturday’s events include:
2-3:30pm – “Botanical Photograms Workshop” by Fereshteh Toosi
In the mid 1850s, botanist Anna Atkins used a direct printing method called cyanotype to document the plants she was studying.
During this hands-on workshop, we will use the same techniques, developing our blue prints using just the sun and water. Together we’ll compose images of plant matter and other materials we find during our field trip.
4-6pm – “Attention Feeder Workshop” by the Laboratory for Material Thinking
The Attention Feeder is a two hour collective exercise in prolonged attention.  We will begin by creating a shared vocabulary for use during a series of guided narratives on the interwoven relationship between living, nonliving and human perception, as a way to perceive in less anthropocentric ways.
6:30-7pm  –“havoc and tumbled” a film by Kera MacKenzie + Andrew Mausert-Mooney

Directors Andrew Mausert-Mooney and Kera MacKenzie and actor Nate Whelden produce live television from one angle and theater from another. Recorded in front of a studio audience during Live to Tape: Artist-Television Festival, May 2015, Chicago, a man attends to the tasks at hand, amidst disruptions. On the other side of the stage/edit: the story of changing American landscapes and the inner character of rare plant life that thrive below telephone lines.

 

Kera MacKenzie is an interdisciplinary artist exploring the space between moving images, photography, sets and performance. She has screened and exhibited at spaces including the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, the Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago Underground Film Festival, High Concept Laboratories, Links Hall, and the MassArt Film Society. Kera has been an artist in residence at ACRE (Wisconsin) and Culturia (Berlin) and was a participating artist at High Desert Test Sites 2013 (New Mexico). She studied at Bennington College, the Art Institute of Boston, and Transart Institute and received her MFA in Moving Image from the University of Illinois at Chicago. Andrew Mausert-Mooney is a Chicago­-based artist working with 16mm film, video, performance and television. Andrewʼs work has shown in festivals, galleries and exhibition series around the world including the American Film Institute, CineVegas, Threewalls, Chicago Underground Film Festival, Pleasure Dome, The Nightingale, and Other Cinema. He received his MFA from the University of Illinois at Chicago in 2012.  MacKenzie and Mausert-Mooney together founded and co-direct ACRE TV, an artist-made live-streaming tele-vision network. ACRETV.org

The people, places, and things featured in Fereshteh Toosi’s art works include oyster mushrooms used for bioremediation, New Orleans soul
food restaurants, benthic macroinvertebrates, lithium salts, and Persian pickles. Most recently Fereshteh’s work utilizes historical photographic processes and handmade 16mm film. Fereshteh volunteers with the Prison and Neighborhood Arts project and rows with a team on the Chicago River. Learn more about her projects at http://fereshteh.net

The Laboratory for Material Thinking was conceived collaboratively by five individuals who, in our practices and research, share a sense of urgency in re-examining humans’ relationship to nonhuman kinds. Within our group of five core collaborators, our practices encompass art making, writing, education, activism and curating in various combinations. Amber Ginsburg, a lecturer in the Department of Visual Arts at the University of Chicago, would be one University collaborator, with Sara Black (SAIC), Karsten Lund (MCA Chicago), Raewyn Martyn (Antioch College) and Caroline Picard (The Green Lantern Press/Sector 2337) forming the collaborative fellowship team.

Elena Ailes, Chuck Cannon, + A Program for Plants

Following Nonhuman Kinds: The Plant Symposium

On Friday, Nov 13 from 7-9pm, Elena Ailes, Chuck Cannon, and A Program for Plants (Joshi Radin, Brian M. John, and Linda Tegg) will each present work about plants covering the topics of tree sex, plant scent, and what it might mean to curate a film festival for plants. This event is part of a Following Nonhuman Kinds: The Plant Symposium, a series of talks, workshops, and performances that explore vegetal life. A full list of events is available here.
– “Sleeping with Plants | Golden Chalice and Bronzed Mirrors: an inquiry into the nature of intimacy, skin and scent,” performance/lecture by Elena Ailes
Solandra grandiflora, a psychotropic vine in the Solanaceae family, commonly known as Golden Chalice or Cup of Gold, is found throughout Central America, the Caribbean, and, though specific cultivation as an ornamental garden species, in parts of the southern United States. The orange trumpet flowers smell like coconuts while blooming, filling the air with scent meant to summon the autonomous apparatus that is so necessary to the plant’s ability to reproduce: the pollinator. Honey bee as sex-aid. The massive orange blossoms also happen to release another sort of summons: a chemical identical in structure to human pheromones normally associated with the human reproduction activities of sex and love. The chemical overlap between flower and person articulates a line of accidental familiarity between two distinct kingdoms, in the biological sense, of being. In a (scent) sense, these biological repetitions of form [identical chemical release, identical receptors] are simultaneous summons, scent-based calls to amorous action In this lecture Ailes will explore the temporal differences between plants and humans, the idealistic and mystical desire for elastic intraaction between human and nonhuman forms, and will ultimately focus on what it means to experience intimacy as a being in and of the world. Parts of this lecture will include: the historical use of the medical term ‘vegetative state’ and the pejorative associations with labeling a human vegetable-like, the complicated set of relations that come with the phrase ‘sleeping with’, and ways that humans and non-human alike transgress their supposedly natural rhythmic ‘registers’ out of desire for a new closeness.
– “Tree sex: slowly, imperceptibly kinky,” a presentation by Chuck Cannon
The unusual nature of plant sex and reproduction is generally under-appreciated, primarily because of the time scale upon which it occurs and the ambiguous and anonymous nature of ‘sex’ among plants. Trees in particular remain mysterious and weird, often being trisexual, extremely promiscuous and sexually deprived. Cannon will discuss how sexual organs serve as the basis of our understanding of species and how they can be deceptively simple avenues for the exploration of evolutionary potential.
– “A Program for Plants” (APP) 
A Program for Plants takes as its starting point the proposition of programming a video art festival for plants. This multifaceted task prompts a series of parallel pragmatic and philosophical questions which re-purpose Chicago’s Video Data Bank as a vehicle for expanding our capacity to empathize with plants. Collaborators Joshi Radin, Brian M. John, and Linda Tegg will discuss the early stages of their research.

 

Elena Ailes is interested in both that which makes her a better person and a worse person, especially in theory. In reality, she is an artist and writer living and working in Chicago, IL. Her most recent bodies of work are centered on the physical and art historical relevance of the horizon line and both absolute and relative methods of orienteering. She earned her MFA in Sculpture from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and is currently working towards a MA in Visual Critical Studies, also from SAIC. She was recently the recipient of Edward L Ryerson Fellowship. Solo and two-person exhibitions include Shear Glory, Devotion Gallery, Brooklyn; our empty rooms, Center for Contemporary Arts, Santa Fe, NM; Adore Aderi, Jon Sommers Gallery, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM.
Dr. Chuck Cannon, Director of the Center for Tree Science at The Morton Arboretum, brings a broad perspective on forests and all of the things that live in them.  First starting out in 1989 as an undergraduate research assistant to study primate behavior in the equatorial rainforests of Indonesian Borneo, he quickly learned that trees were the most important (and the most poorly understood) element in any forested landscape.  His commitment to tree science has remained firm since that early insight and his work has taken him to over a dozen countries and involved a wide range of scientific endeavors, from basic species description to on-the-ground forest management policy.  He will be leading the many excellent tree scientists at the Arboretum in the shaping and expansion of our knowledge of trees and forests around the world.

Giovanni Aloi, Sebastian Alvarez, + Kiam Marcelo Junio

Following Nonhuman Kinds: The Plant Symposium

On Thursday, November 12th from 7-9pm, Giovanni Aloi, Sebastian Alvarez, and Kiam Marcelo Junio will present two talks, and one performance. This event is part of a Following Nonhuman Kinds: The Plant Symposium, a series of talks, workshops, and performances that explore vegetal life. A full list of events is available here. Thursday’s event include:
Artist Talk by Kiam Marcelo Junio

– “Crypto-Phototropics: A reflection on how plants see, and how they can help us forecast the future of cities and our understanding of culture,” a lecture by Sebastian Alvarez

“Why Look at Plants?” a talk by Giovanni Aloi
New definitions of plant intelligence and plant agency have over the past thirty years substantially shifted scientific conceptions of the vegetal world. Yet, a lot more work is needed in order to change attitudes and perspective towards plants in both academic and non academic realms. What challenges are involved in further rethinking animal ontologies? What impact would a different consideration of human-animal-plant relationships have on broader environmental/eco-issues/systems? For the past nine months Aloi has been working on a book titled ‘Why Look at Plants?’ which will focus on contemporary art and the epistemological opportunities that an artistic context could provide to such ontological reconfiguring. The aim of this talk is to discuss, through specific examples, the content of the eight chapters currently planned.
Giovanni Aloi is an art historian in modern and contemporary art specializing in the representation of animals, plants, and environmental concern in the visual realm. He studied History of Art and Art Practice in Milan and then moved to London in 1997 to further his studies at Goldsmiths University where he obtained a Postgraduate Diploma in Art History, a Master in Visual Cultures, and a Doctorate on the subject of natural history in contemporary art. Aloi currently teaches for the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Sotheby’s Institute of Art New York and London and Tate Galleries. He regularly works for radio and TV and also is the Editor in Chief of Antennae, the Journal of Nature in Visual Culture. His first book, Art & Animals, was published in November 2011. Aloi is currently working on two monographs, one on taxidermy in contemporary art and another on plants in contemporary art, both due for publication in 2016.
Born and raised in Lima-Peru, Sebastian Alvarez is an interdisciplinary artist and independent researcher. Working across diverse media, including film, audio, performance, and installation, his artistic practice explores the interrelation and fragmentation of human systems.  He received an MFA in Performance Art from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and has performed, curated, and presented work internationally at such venues and institutions as Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, Museum of Contemporary Art (Chicago), Hyde Park Art Center, Chicago Cultural Center, Whitney Biennial (NYC), Postgarage (Graz, Austria), Townhouse Gallery (Cairo, Egypt), and the Ecole Nationale Supérieure d’Art Bourges (Bourges, France).
Kiam Marcelo Junio (preferred gender pronoun: “they/their/them”) is a Chicago-based interdisciplinary artist creating work through photography, video, installation, performance, and hybrid forms. Their research and art practice centers around queer identities, Philippine history and the Filipino diaspora, American imperialism, the politics of visibility, and social justice through collaborative processes and healing modalities. Kiam served seven years in the US Navy as a Hospital Corpsman. They were born in the Philippines, and have lived in the U.S., Japan, and Spain.

Lindsey French + Deanna Ledezma

Following Nonhuman Kinds: The Plant Symposium

On Wednesday, November 11th from 7-9pm, Lindsey French and Deanna Ledezma will present two talks, one on the subject of plant photography and another on toxicity and communication. This event is part of a Following Nonhuman Kinds: The Plant Symposium, a series of talks, workshops, and performances that explore vegetal life. A full list of events is available here.
“Little History of Plant Photography” a lecture by Deanna Ledezma
In his 1861 speech “Pictures and Progress,” Frederick Douglass declared, “Daguerre by the simple but all abounding sunlight has converted the planet into a picture gallery. As munificent in the exalted arena of art, as in the radiation of light and heat, the God of day not only decks the earth with rich fruit and beautiful flowers—but studs the world with pictures.” “Little History of Plant Photography” traces the interactions between two objects dependent upon light for their material existence: photographs and plants. From William Henry Fox Talbot’s photogenic drawings of botanical specimens to Anna Atkins’s cyanotypes of British algae to twentieth-century vernacular photographs of houseplants, this talk presents a history of photography through which plants pervade.
“proposals for practicing unsafe communication: Intimacy, toxicity, urushiol” lecture by Lindsey French
In The Universe of Things, Steven Shaviro suggests that “a feeling always involves some alteration of the one who feels.” In a continuing search for adopting a phytocentric perspective, what role can feeling play, specifically in the negotiations between individual bodies? A broader definition of communication offers the potential to reframe the exchange of chemicals as forms of dialogue with nonhuman others. Looking to urushiol, the active resin in poison ivy which can cause allergic reaction in human skin, what are potential practices of intimacy and vulnerability with vegetal otherness?
Lindsey French is an artist and educator whose work engages in gestures of communication with landscapes and the nonhuman. Embracing a number of mediation strategies, her projects materialize as texts written in collaboration with trees, video performances of attempted dialogues with the landscape, and sound installations of distant and displaced forests. She has shared her work in places such as the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago, the Chicago Cultural Center, the Chicago Perch, the Pico House Gallery in Los Angeles, Flying Object in Hadley, MA and in conjunction with the International Symposium of Electronics Arts in both Albuquerque and Vancouver. Her work has been featured in an essay in Leonardo and discussed on podcasts for Creative Disturbance. French currently teaches courses that explore new media practices and site specific research at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in the Art and Technology Studies, Sculpture, and Contemporary Practices Departments.
Deanna Ledezma is a Ph.D. student in the Art History Department at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). Her research explores turn-of-the-century vernacular photography and the material culture of memory in the United States. Her projects have examined the material practices of photography in the home, hairwork and photographic jewelry, and the transformation of nineteenth-century relics in the work of contemporary artist Dario Robleto. She received her master’s degree in Art History from UIC and undergraduate degrees in Art and English from Texas State University. During her graduate studies, she has held the Abraham Lincoln Fellowship (2011–2012; 2013–2014) and the Diversifying Higher Education Faculty in Illinois (DFI) Fellowship (2014–2015).

Mark Payne + Caroline Picard

On Saturday, November 7th, Mark Payne and Caroline Picard will each give talks on the subject of plants, followed by a casual discussion. Payne’s talk is called Before the law: Imagining crimes against trees, and Picard will give a curatorial talk about Sector’s current exhibition Imperceptibly and Slowly Opening. This event is part of Following Nonhuman Kinds: The Plant Symposium.
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Mark Payne is Professor in the Department of Classics, the John U. Nef Committee on Social Thought, and the College at the University of Chicago. His first book, Theocritus and the Invention of Fiction, was published by Cambridge University Press in 2007. His second book, The Animal Part: Human and Other Animals in the Poetic Imagination, was published by the University of Chicago Press in 2010 and received the 2011 Warren-Brooks Award for Outstanding Literary Criticism. His current book project, Chorality: On natural appearing, is about Nature as a living presence around human life in Greek poetry and philosophy, German Romanticism, and the Anglo-American weird tale.
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Caroline Picard is an artist, writer, publisher, and curator. Her writing has appeared in Artslant, ArtForum.com, Flash Art International, and Paper Monument, among other publications. In 2014 she was the Curatorial Fellow at La Box, ENSA in France, and became a member of the SYNAPSE International Curators’ Network of the Haus der Kulturen der Welt in Berlin in 2015. She is the Executive Director of The Green Lantern Press—a nonprofit publishing house and art producer in operation since 2005—and the Co-Director of Sector 2337, a hybrid artspace/bar/bookstore in Chicago. www.sector2337.com.
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Ish Klein / Greg Purcell / Joel Craig

On Friday November 6th at 7pm, Ish Klein, Greg Purcell, and Joel Craig will give readings. Doors open at 6:30 pm. This event is free.

Ish Klein’s third book of poetry is entitled Consolation and Mirth. She also writes plays and makes videos. She is a founding member of the Connecticut River Valley Poets Theater (CRVPT) and her plays have been produced in America and England.

Greg Purcell’s first book, The Fundaments, is due in October of 2015 from Poor Claudia. His chapbooks include The New Music and More Fresh Air, and has been anthologized in A Best of Fence: The First Nine Years. He has been associated with The Danny’s Reading Series in Chicago, and the St. Mark’s Bookshop Reading Series in New York. He lives in Amherst, MA, with his partner Ish Klein.

Poet, editor, and reading series curator Joel Craig was born in Iowa. In his free verse poems, he uses the cadence of conversation to trace the widening wake of narrative. He is the author of the poetry collection The White House (2012), and his chapbook, Shine Tomorrow, is one of three chapbooks in the Lost Horse Press New Poets Series: New Poets, Short Books, Volume III(2008, series editor Marvin Bell). Cofounder and curator of the Danny’s Tavern Reading Series, Craig has also served as poetry editor for MAKE: A Literary Magazine. He contributes to the multimedia group Pulseprogramming. Craig lives in Chicago.

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Casablanca Retro

Colonial Photography, History and Memory in Postcolonial Morocco

On Thursday, November 5th at 7pm, Patricia Goldsworthy-Bishop will give a talk on Colonial Photography, History and Memory in Postcolonial Morocco. This event is co-presented with InterCcECT. Doors open at 6:30pm. This event is free.

Casablanca Retro: Colonial Photography, History and Memory in Postcolonial Morocco

Throughout the colonial era photographers such as Marcelin Flandrin, an Algerian pied-noir who settled in Morocco at the establishment of the protectorate, collaborated with the government and tourism boards to construct a European vision of North African society and history. Known as the photographer of Casablanca because of his heavy involvement with the Protectorate government, after independence Flandrin’s work was criticized for reproducing Orientalist stereotypes and supporting the colonizing mission. Since the 1980s, however, Moroccan cultural, educational, and financial institutions have reinterpreted Flandrin’s images in order to resituate the protectorate as a part of Moroccan, rather than French, history. This talk traces Flandrin’s transformation from an archetypal French colonial photographer to a part of Moroccan heritage through an analysis of Flandrin’s 1928 and 1956 publications on photographs of the city of Casablanca (Casablanca from 1889 to the Present) and their subsequent reprinting by Moroccan scholars in 1988 (Casablanca Retro). Through the reinterpretation of these images and the appropriation of Flandrin by Moroccans, we can see the process of writing, resisting, and revising history and the instrumental role played by imagery in this process in colonial and post-colonial Morocco.

Patricia Goldsworthy-Bishop is Assistant Professor of History at Western Oregon University where she teaches courses in French and North African colonial history. Goldsworthy-Bishop earned her Ph.D. from the University of California, Irvine and was a Mellon Post-doctoral Fellow at the Illinois Program for Research in the Humanities at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 2010–2011. She is presently working on a book manuscript entitled Colonial Negatives that examines the role of photography in early twentieth-century Moroccan history.

Inter Chicago Circle for Experimental Critical Theory or InterCcECT convenes a Chicago circle of readers, writers, thinkers, and makers working in and beyond the university, through and around the commitment to theory. “Theory” we encompass in its critical, experimental, philosophical, aesthetic, political, literary, and psychoanalytic forms. InterCcECT coordinates the union of sets in Chicago via reading groups, workshops, performances, conferences, seminars, studios, parties, and other platforms.

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The New New Corpse Screening Goes To Milwaukee

A Film Program Curated by Christy LeMaster

Thursday, October 29 at 8 pm
Presented by MIcrolights @ Woodland Pattern Book Center, Milwaukee, WI
720 E Locust St / $5 at the door

The New New Corpse — a film screening curated by Chicago-based programmer Christy LeMaster — features eight moving image works that frustrate our usual experience of bodies onscreen. These works subvert the traditional mode of watching bodies in narrative action, or as objects of sexual desire, or as merely characters. Rather these works use the body as conceptual site, performative metaphor, or abstracted modular component. This screening was originally presented as part of Chicago gallery SECTOR 2337ʼs inaugural exhibition The New [New] Corpse in December 2014.

Program Details:
BOUNCING IN THE CORNER #36DDD by Dara Greenwald
(1999, USA, video->digital file, 3 min)
“A funny take-off on Bruce Nauman’s early video work, replaces Nauman’s repetitive movements with a large breasted woman slamming herself into the corner of a room, the bouncing of her breasts tweaking his ideas of formalist perfection.” —Fred Camper (The Chicago Reader, January 21, 2000)

BABY! LOVE YOUR BODY! EPISODE 1 by Poussy Draama & Fannie Sosa
(2014, France, digital file, 7 min)
“baby, love your body” is a tv show for kids, created as a platform to exchange thoughts on how to talk to children about sexuality, consent, respect and compassion. our belief is that decolonisation and critical thinking needs to be a language we speak with our kids from the beginning. let’s create body positive narratives for children together” – PD & FS

AFFECTION by Blair Bogin & Dayna Gross
(2014, USA, digital file, 1 min)
The gravity of bodies in friendship.

CUT by Matthias Müller and Christoph Girardet
(2013, Germany, digital file, 13 min)
The body as a wound that never heals. -MM

NINE GATES by Paweł Wojtasik
(2012, United States, digital file, 12 min)
Presented with the support of Video Data Bank
Nine Gates explores the possibility of transcendence through sexual passion: averting the gaze from the objectification of the other, the female body or the obscure enemy, to the vast and microscopic details of the body unknown to the viewer, becoming a meditation on love beyond definition. – Video Data Bank

TWO FACES by Hermine Freed
(1972, United States, video-> digital file, 6 min)
Presented with the support of Video Data Bank
An early video expression of the coporeal in body, medium, and mirror.

DEEP SLEEP by Basma Alsharif
(2014, Malta/Greece/France/Palestine, digital file, 13 min)
A body travels in two places simultaneously. A state of hypnosis for both artist and audience. Pushing the limits of human perception.

GLOBE by Ken Jacobs
(1971, USA, 16mm, 22 min)
Previously titled: EXCERPT FROM THE RUSSIAN REVOLUTION. Flat image (of snowbound suburban housing tract) blossoms into 3D only when viewer places Eye Opener before the right eye. (Keeping both eyes open, of course. As with all stereo experiences, center seats are best. Space will deepen as one views further from the screen.) The found-sound is X-ratable (not for children or Nancy Reagan) but is important to the film’s perfect balance (GLOBE is symmetrical) of divine and profane. –K. J.

TRT: 77 min

Christy LeMaster founded Chicago’s rough and ready microcinema, The Nightingale in 2008. She has programmed screenings for the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, Chicago Filmmakers, Columbia College Chicago, The Onion City Experimental Film and Video Festival, The Chicago Underground Film Festival, Chicago Film Archives, Sector 2337, and Intuit Gallery. She teaches  Media Theory at Columbia College Chicago. She has been a movie critic on the NPR Chicago affiliate, WBEZ’s morning show 848 and CINE-FILE.info. She was a 2011 Flaherty Film Seminar Fellow and a Summer Forum 2012 resident. She has served on juries for Media City, Onion City, Chicago International Children’s Film Festival and the Dallas Video Fest. She is currently programming events for The Nightingale, TRACERS, Chances Dances 10th Anniversary Retrospective, and co-curating Run of Life, an experimental documentary series for the Chicago experimental media venue, Constellation.

Thom Donovan + Cassandra Troyan

On Wednesday October 28th at 7pm, Thom Donovan and Cassandra Troyan will give readings. Doors open at 6:30 pm. This event is free and is sponsored in part by Poets and Writers.

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Thom Donovan is the author of The Hole (Displaced Press, 2012), Withdrawn (Compline Editions, forthcoming), and Usufruct (with Rob Halpern; Timeless, Infinite Light, forthcoming winter 2016). He coedits and publishes ON Contemporary Practice, and is the coeditor of TO LOOK AT THE SEA IS TO BECOME WHAT ONE IS: an Etel Adnan Reader (with Brandon Shimoda; Nightboat Books, 2014) and Supple Science: a Robert Kocik Primer (with Michael Cross; ON Contemporary Practice, 2013). His collected writings regarding the Occupy Movement (2011-2014) will be available this month as an e-book with Essay Press. Since 2005, he has edited the weblog Wild Horses of Fire, where you can find out more about his work. He teaches visual art, poetics, and writing at Pratt Institute and Parsons.

A CURE FIT FOR A KING 3

Cassandra Troyan is a writer, ex-artist, and pétroleuse whose writing, described by Blake Butler, “takes the Sade-ian end of the oversharing shtick, turning one’s own private human pain into a diorama reflecting the environments and brains that birthed it.” Their work demarcates spaces for experience through exploration of myths, normative (gender) roles, historical legacies, and cultural influence as a means to re-organizing agency in the disorganization of daily life. As a desirous voyeur wanting to reanimate the most gorgeous impulses in the unlikeliest of places, they are a trans-historical operator deriving pleasure and power from situations of submission, violence, labor, queer romance, sex work, horror, and capital. They are the author of THRONE OF BLOOD (Solar Luxuriance, 2013), BLACKEN ME BLACKEN ME, GROWLED (Tiny Hardcore Press, 2014), KILL MANUAL (Artifice Books, 2014) and the chapbook HATRED OF WOMEN (Solar Luxuriance, 2014). Forthcoming in 2016 is a chapbook from Kenning Editions’ Ordinance series, entitled “FREEDOM & PROSTITUTION.” They received their MFA in Visual Arts from the University of Chicago in 2012 and currently live in the bay. http://onemurderleadstoanother.com/

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Nathanaël / Jen Scappettone / Kit Schluter

On Friday October 23rd at 7pm, Nathanaël, Jen Scappettone, and Kit Schluter will give readings. Doors open at 6:30 pm. This event is free.

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Nathanaël is the (self-)translating author of more than twenty books.

Photo: Christine Taylor

Photo: Christine Taylor

Jennifer Scappettone is a poet, translator, and scholar, the author of the poetry collection From Dame Quickly and of Exit 43, a cross-genre work on toxic archaeologies and salvage forthcoming from Atelos Press, with a letterpress palimpsest, A Chorus Fosse, out sooner from Compline. She edited and translated Locomotrix: Selected Poetry and Prose of Amelia Rosselli, and is curator of PennSound Italiana, an audiovisual sector of the PennSound archive devoted to contemporary Italian experimental poetry. Her critical study, Killing the Moonlight: Modernism in Venice, was recently published by Columbia University Press. Her visual and sound poems have been installed in Berkeley, Brussels, Chicago, Ghent, Nagoya, New York City, Providence, Rome, and Turin; she has collaborated with a range of musicians, dancers, and designers, including Marco Ariano, the Difforme Ensemble, and Walter Paradiso (on Exit 43 operettas for performance and video), Kathy Westwater and Seung Jae Lee (on the performance work PARK at Fresh Kills Landfill, Pratt Institute, and elsewhere), composer Paul Rudy and AGENCY architecture (on X Locus, installations for the courtyard and tract of Trajan’s aqueduct at the American Academy in Rome).

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Kit Schluter [@dedreytnien] is translator of The Book of Monelle by Marcel Schwob, The Cold by Jaime Saenz, and Circle of Dogs by Amandine André (in collaboration with J. Spaar), with translation-work forthcoming from Wakefield Press, Canarium Books, and Solar Luxuriance. His writing can be found in BOMB, Boston Review, Elective Affinities, and in Inclusivity Blueprint, a chapbook recently released by Diez. He is recipient of a 2015 “Discovery”/Boston Review prize, and a 2016 NEA Literature Translation fellowship. He lives in Oakland, CA, where he co-edits O’clock Press.

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Impatient Flowers: An Evening of Performance

Katherine Behar & Joshua Kent

Thursday, Oct 1, 2015

7-9pm

Impatient Flowers: An Evening of Performance is the second annual curatorial collaboration and co-production between Sector 2337 and Every house has a door, and will feature works by Katherine Behar and Joshua Kent on Thursday, October 1st, 2015.

Conceived in relation to Sector 2337’s exhibit Imperceptibly and Slowly OpeningImpatient Flowers takes its title from an alternate reading of philosopher Michael Marder’s paragraph on Clarice Lispector.

As she puts it in Learning to Live, what is needed is “[p]atience: to observe the flowers, imperceptibly and slowly opening.” This attitude, by the way, is something Kierkegaard could not experience, according to his own ironic admission, similarly linked to the vegetal world: “I lack altogether the patience to live. I cannot see the grass grow, but since I cannot, I don’t feel at all inclined to.” … lingering with grass or with the flowers in a state of forbearance is a token for living in the eyes of the Danish philosopher and the Brazilian writer alike.

As children we always misheard the name of the annual flowers known as impatiens as “impatience.” Why call a flower that? Now after reading Marder on Lispecter, it occurs to us that were we to anthropomorphize the entire garden population, we might discover some plants that resemble Kierkegaard in their inability to sit still long enough to observe their own unfolding. After all, what humans watch their hair grow? These speedy philosopher type plants would be the impatient impatiens. Their relationship to those less anxious, neighboring flowers might echo the relationship between an ephemeral performance and more static art objects that seem to rest patiently in a gallery, indifferent to human presence. Performance has its distinct inclinations toward time, and in this respect, the performances with their activated objects in this series appear as the garden’s most impatient flowers.

Katherine Behar is a Brookyn-based interdisciplinary artist whose work includes performance, interactive installation, video, and writing about digital culture. Behar’s work appears at festivals, galleries, performance spaces, and art centers worldwide, including the Museum of Contemporary Art North Miami, Judson Church in New York; UNOACTU in Dresden; The Girls Club Collection in Miami; Feldman Gallery + Project Space in Portland; De Balie Centre for Culture and Politics in Amsterdam; the Mediations Biennale in Poznan; the Chicago Cultural Center; the Swiss Institute in Rome; the National Museum of Art in Cluj-Napoca; and many others. She is the recipient of fellowships from The MacDowell Colony, Art Journal and the Rubin Museum of Art; and grants including the Franklin Furnace Fund, the U.S. Consulate in Leipzig, the Illinois Arts Council, and the Cleveland Performance Art Festival. Her ongoing projects include two collaborations, the performance art group Disorientalism, with Marianne M. Kim, and the art and technology team Resynplement, with Ben Chang and Silvia Ruzanka. Behar’s writings on technology and culture have been published in Lateral, Media-N, Parsons Journal for Information Mapping, Visual Communication Quarterly, and EXTENSIONS: The Online Journal for Embodied Technology. She is Assistant Professor of New Media Arts at Baruch College.

Joshua Kent is a Chicago based inner-disciplinary artist. His visual and performative practice navigates the intersection of writing, movement and sculptural installation. His work explores everyday poetics and its relationship to material objects. Joshua graduated from the performance department of The School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 2010, where he was a Presidential Merit Scholar. Recently Mr. Kent was awarded a CAAP Grant from the City of Chicago, and was selected as a 2012 LinkUp Residency Artist at Links Hall. He was one of ten local artists shown in the 2013 Rapid Pulse international performance festival. In 2014 his work was featured at EXPO Chicago and he was also included in Newcity’s annual list of Breakout Artists. Currently he is developing featured programing to be shown in the 2015 Chicago Artist Month. Joshua also facilitates the daily operations of St. Francis House, a community working to serve the needs of those experiencing homelessness. He has lived and worked on site for the last four years.

Every house has a door was formed in 2008 by Lin Hixson, director, and Matthew Goulish, dramaturge, to convene project specific teams of specialists, including emerging as well as internationally recognized artists. Drawn to historically or critically neglected subjects, Every house creates performances in which the subject remains largely absented from the finished work. The performances distill and separate presentational elements into distinct modes – recitation, installation, movement, music – to grant each its own space and time, and inviting the viewer to assemble the parts in duration, after the fact of the performance, to rediscover the missing subject. Works include Let us think of these things always. Let us speak of them never. (2009) in response to the work of Yugoslavian filmmaker Dušan Makavejev, Testimonium (2013) a collaboration with the band Joan of Arc in response to Charles Reznikoff’s Testimony poems, and the installation/performance Caesar’s Bridge (2014-2015).

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Joshua Clover / Jenny Boully / Rachel Galvin

On Wednesday September 30th at 7pm, Joshua Clover, Jenny Boully, and Rachel Galvin will give readings. Doors open at 6:30 pm. This event is free.

Joshua Clover is a communist, though various other communists don’t think so. The guidelines are unclear. He is also a professor of literature and critical theory at the University of California Davis. He has collaborated on writing, publishing, and conference organization with Jasper Bernes, Chris Chen, Timothy Kreiner, Annie McClanahan, Chris Nealon, Louis-Georges Schwartz, Juliana Spahr, Michael Szalay, and others.

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Jenny Boully is the author of not merely because of the unknown that was stalking toward them, The Book of Beginnings and Endings: Essays, The Body: An Essay, and other books.

 

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Rachel Galvin is the author of a book of poems, Pulleys & Locomotion (Black Lawrence), and a chapbook, Zoetrope(Chätaro Editores), and translator of Raymond Queneau’s Hitting the Streets (Carcanet), which won the Scott Moncrieff Prize for French Translation. Her poems and translations appear in journals such as Boston Review, Chicago Review, Colorado Review, Drunken Boat, Gulf Coast, McSweeney’s, The New Yorker,  PN Review, and Poetry. A new collection of poems, Lost Property Unit, was a finalist for the National Poetry Series and Alice James Books’ Kinereth Gensler Award. Galvin is an assistant professor in the Department of English at the University of Chicago.

 

 

MattMorris_QQ

The Perfect Kiss (QQ)**

Chicago Book Launch and Reading with Matt Morris, Christopher Backs, & Nathanaël

Sept 16th, 2015
7-9pm
Sector 2337 celebrates a recent catalogue for Matt Morris’ exhibition The Perfect Kiss (QQ* *questioning, queer, a project currently currently on view at the Contemporary Arts Center in Cincinnati. Both exhibition and catalogue examine the life and work of American conceptualist James Lee Byars (1932–1997) as well as the conditions and relationships between artists, museums, collectors, and art history by which projects like these are realized. Morris questions how art histories are crafted, by whom, and at the expense of what being excluded from canon. The exhibition catalogue, The Perfect Kiss (QQ)* *questioning, queer, includes documentation of the exhibition, essays by Steven Matijcio, Gordon Hall, Annie Nocenti, and Steve Reinke, as well as an interview between Morris and the curatorial collective Triple Candie. The book’s design is inspired by Byars’ first artist’s book 100,000 Minutes from 1969. Designers Frederick Eschrich and Rob Wilson developed a researched vision for the book that parallels Morris’ own inquiries into Byars’ notion of perfection by reacting to ideas of perfection in graphic design and typography history. The book is produced in an edition of 500.
For this occasion, Morris will read an original, related text of his own in tandem with Christopher Backs and Nathanaël.MattMorris_ThePerfectKiss

Christopher Backs is an artist and writer living in Chicago. As an artist, the majority of his work exists in the form of paintings and short animated operas. As a writer, he focuses primarily on short and long fiction as well as playwriting. In 2013, he was awarded a residency the Edward F. Albee Foundation in Montauk, during which, among other literary achievements, he sat on the lap of the Foundation’s venerable namesake.

Matt Morris is an artist, writer, and sometimes curator based in Chicago. He has presented artwork at Queer Thoughts, peregrineprogram, The Bike Room, Gallery 400, Sector 2337, and The Franklin in Chicago, IL; Fjord and Vox Populi in Philadelphia, PA; The Contemporary Arts Center, U·turn Art Space, Aisle, and semantics in Cincinnati, OH; Clough-Hanson Gallery and Beige in Memphis, TN; with additional projects in Reims, France; Greencastle, IN; Lincoln, NE; and Baton Rouge, LA. Morris is a transplant from southern Louisiana who holds a BFA from the Art Academy of Cincinnati, and earned an MFA in Art Theory + Practice from Northwestern University, as well as a Certificate in Gender + Sexuality Studies. Recent curatorial efforts have been presented at Western Exhibitions and The Hills Esthetic Center in Chicago, IL. He is a lecturer at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago who teaches in the Sculpture as well as the Painting and Drawing departments. He is a contributor to Artforum.com, Art Papers, Flash Art, Newcity, and Sculpture; and his writing appears in numerous exhibition catalogues and artist monographs.

Nathanaël is the (self-)translating author of more than a score of books. Recent works include Asclepias: The Milkweeds (2015); The Middle Notebookes (2015); and Sotto l’immagine (2014).

 

 

Buy

$40.00

  • TITLE: The Perfect Kiss (QQ)* *questioning, queer
  • AUTHOR/S: Steven Matijcio, Gordon Hall, Annie Nocenti, and Steve Reinke, with an interview between Matt Morris and the curatorial collective Triple Candie.
  • PUBLISHER: Contemporary Arts Center in Cincinnati
  • YEAR: 2015
  • BINDING: Perfect
  • EDITION SIZE: 500
A_Ross

Bending the Circuit

One Night of Screenings for Tertiary Dimensions

Using the group exhibition, Tertiary Dimensions as a platform, curator Alexandria Eregbu invited Margaret Bobo-Dancy, Amina Ross, and D. Cain to present a few of their cinematic works. The resulting program adds a temporal aspect to Tertiary Dimensions, while continuing to draw out politics of the body, gender, and performance.

Margaret Bobo-Dancy (b. 1990) is a Video and Sculpture artist living and producing in Chicago. She received her BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 2013. Margaret has exhibited nationally at the Spectacle Theatre of New York City and with the Nomadic Limbs Dance Collective in Milwaukee. Bobo-Dancy has been a part of exhibitions in Chicago including Woman Made Gallery, the Nightingale Theatre, The Defibrillator, and the Fulton Street Art Collective. Her work has been highlighted in the Chicago Reader and the online art forum Hyperallergic. She is the recent recipient of the Chances Dances ‘Critical Fierceness Grant’ to finalize sculptures from her most recent body of work, “Transverberate.”

D. Cain is a Chicago-based Moving Image artist & theorist. He is a graduate of Columbia College Chicago’s Cinematic Art + Science Program. His work explores the invisible realms of being and the subjects bound by them. He nurtures & observes the emotionality of characters and the unconscious to influence its very own aesthetic, creating unique expressionist perceptions.

Amina Ross is a transdisciplinary Chicago-based artist. Through visual abstraction she creates palatable tensions of repulsion and seduction. The conceptions of black visuality and the sexualized image are combined through a blending of image, writing, performance, curatorial and installation work. She has shown work at numerous venues including the Black Cinema House, Woman Made Gallery, Links Hall and Defibrillator Performance Art Gallery. She has spoken on panels and taught workshops at College Arts Association Conference, Black Artist Retreat, Threewalls and The School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Amina is committed to creating spaces that foster thinking, conversation, growth and love. These ambitions manifested in the founding of 3rd Language, queer arts collective; which has received the Propeller Fund grant and Davis Foundation awards for its summer workshops series. Amina holds a BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and is currently a teaching artist at Hyde Park Art Center.  She is a part of Chicago Artist Coalition’s BOLT residency 2015-2016 cohort.

SonyaLevy

24 Hour Broadcast on ACRETV

June 29-June 30th

For 24 hours ACRETV will continuously screen three programs with  videos about objects, animals, plants, and machines curated by The Green Lantern Press.

Plants, Machines, Animals, and Objects!
June 29 – 30, 2015Airing at 12am, 3am, 6am, 9am, 12pm, 3pm, 6pm, 9pm CDT
The screening features works by Himali Singh SoinChloë BrownLaura AishLaura CintiPeter MatthewsMatthew C. WilsonQuiet ensembleSonia LevyMax StocklosalocalStyleGillian WyldeNEOZOONLinda TeggFilip Kwaitkowski, Ines Lechleitner, Smriti Mehra.
Everywhere we turn, we find a territory of nonhuman things. It is impossible to escape the trace of others—from material structures (plants, machines, animals and objects) to those all but invisible bodies outside the bounds of human perception (atoms, molecules, pollution, viruses, satellites, planets, etc.). What would an aesthetic look like that included these many other things? Is such an aesthetic possible?

To further explore a line of research established by its affiliated reading group Following Nonhuman KindsThe Green Lantern Press curated a series of short, related films that first screened at Sector 2337 in Chicago in June 2015, and again on ACRE TV. This series was curated by Giovanni Aloi, Kathleen Kelley, Trevor Perri, and Caroline Picard.
PROGRAM:

1. Himali Singh Soin (in collaboration with Dario Villanueva), “The Particle and the Wave” (12:47)
2. Chloë Brown, “Dialogue: Panthera Leo” (3:16)
3. Laura Aish, “The Machine”, (5:14)
4. Laura Cinti “Nanomagnetic Plants” (1:55)
5. Peter Matthews, “The Ocean Moves Through It” (11:34)
6. Matthew C. Wilson, “Forecast” (2:52)
7. Quiet ensemble, “Orienta” (2:45)
8. Sonia Levy, “I Roam” (3:16)
9. Max Stocklosa, “More World Material” (15:32)
10. localStyle, “Chew”, (3:33)
11. Gillian Wylde, “A as in Animal” (2:46)
12. NEOZOON, “BUCK FEVER” (5:54)
13. NEOZOON, “MY BBY 8L3W” (3:03)
14. Linda Tegg, “Sheep Actress” (2:58)
15. Filip Kwaitkowski, “Tiera” (2:47)
16. Chloë Brown & Ines Lechleitner, “The Hum” (3:19)
17. Smriti Mehra, “Authanakoota (Banquet)” (13:58)

 

Rehearsal of a Grand Opera for One Person
June 29 – 30, 2015Airing at 1:30am, 4:30am, 7:30am, 10:30am, 1:30pm, 4:30pm, 7:30pm, 10:30pm CDTBy Devin King & Caroline Picard

Pulling from toy theater and the operatic tradition of regietheater, combined with the effect of streaming media in the present day, Caroline Picard and Devin King’s Grand Opera for One Person presents a 48-hour installation, interrupted for 2 hours by improvisatory guitar. The entire 48-hours is conceived as a performance of objects highlighting, in part, the potential for four 3-dimensional paintings to function as micro-stages that illicit a sense of anticipation and promise for aesthetic transformation within the viewer. The 2-hour interruption, or musical interlude, creates an intermission in the tableau, inverting traditional expectations about space and human relation.

Rehearsal of a Grand Opera for One Person assumes that a space can be active without human presence; a painting has the ability to move and affect, even while it is inanimate. Furthering that point, a birds-eye video loops simultaneously, capturing four acts and a curtain call of assorted objects as they move back, forth and around a black table by a pair of gloved hands. This simple choreography establishes a flux and flow of relations between things performing for a camera.

The collaboration was inspired by two separate lectures, samples of which are integrated into a looping 20-minute audio track. The first lecture about Graham Harman, Louis Zukofsky, John Cage and the sample-as-object (by King), and the second about Timothy Morton, Giorgio Agamben and The Pancantantra (by Picard) provide an ambient background text about nature and object oriented ontology.

The Opera is a Total Art Experience. It is massive, expensive, glittering and refined. Its high status and rarified aesthetic is easily inaccessible and exclusive — it is an older tradition, with massive audiences who sit together in vast, ornate rooms. King and Picard are interested in the potential for that form to be appropriated, reduced, tweaked and recontextualized as a one-on-one event, in which humans may or may not be present. This performance was their first rehearsal. This piece was performed on November 19th, 2012 in the basement of New Capital, in Chicago, Illinois.

Testimonium (quiet form) in Bourges, France
June 29 – 30, 2015
Airing at 2am, 5am, 8am, 11am, 2pm, 5pm, 8pm, 11pm CDT
By Every house has a door
Video documentation from a performance, 53’15”, La Box ENSA, France, 2014. Video by Alexia Morinaux.
Organized in conjunction with the Ghost Nature symposium, Following Nonhuman Kinds.During a symposium at La Box, ENSA in Bourges, France, Every house has a door performs a different version of Testimonium — Testimonium (quiet form). Joan of Arc is not present. Instead Stephen Fiehn and Bryan Saner occupy the entire stage with a series of coordinated movements from the original piece. This is a quiet version, a version for a bi-lingual audience, a version focused on the choreography of objects within the original performance.
Every house has a door was formed in 2008 by Lin Hixson, director, and Matthew Goulish, dramaturge, to convene project-specific teams of specialists, including emerging as well as internationally recognized artists. Drawn to historically or critically neglected subjects, Every house creates performances in which the subject remains largely absented from the finished work. The performances distil and separate presentational elements into distinct modes – recitation, installation, movement, music – to grant each its own space and time, and inviting the viewer to assemble the parts in duration, after the fact of the performance, to rediscover the missing subject. Works include Let us think of these things always. Let us speak of them never. (2009) in response to the work of Yugoslavian filmmaker Dušan Makavejev, Testimonium (2013) a collaboration with the band Joan of Arc in response to Charles Reznikoff’s Testimony poems, and the on-going project 9 Beginnings based on local performance archives.
La-foulée-768x1024

Book Release: Nathanaël's The Middle Notebookes & Asclepias: The Milkweeds

with readings from Nathanaël and John Beer

On Saturday June 20th, we will celebrate two new books from Nathanaël: The Middle Notebookes & Asclepias: The Milkweeds. Nathanaël and John Beer will give readings. Doors open at 6:30 pm. This event is free.

Nathanaël is the (self-)translating author of more than twenty books.

 

John Beer is the author of the poetry collection The Waste Land and Other Poems (2010), winner of the Norma Farber First Book Award from the Poetry Society of America, and the chapbook Lucinda (2013). Beer received his MFA from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop. He is the former literary assistant to poet Robert Lax, and the editor of Lax’s Poems (1962-1997) (2013). A former theater critic for Time Out Chicago, Beer’s criticism has appeared in Verse, the Denver QuarterlyChicago Review, and other magazines. He currently teaches at Portland State University.

 

About the Books

 

The Middle Notebookes (New York: Nightboat Books, 2015) began in French, as three carnets, written in keeping with three stages of an illness: an onset and remission, a recurrence and further recurrence, a death and the after of that death. But the narrative only became evident subsequently; the malady identified by these texts was foremost a literary one, fastened to a body whose concealment had become, not only untenable, but perhaps, in a sense, murderous. It is possible, then, that more than anything, these Notebookes attest both to the commitment, and the eventual, though unlikely, prevention of, a murder.

 

The talks gathered in Asclepias: The Milkweeds (New York: Nightboat Books, 2015) are all concerned with discrepancy and extinction. Polylingual and transdisciplinary, each essay addresses translation as a form of disagreement and photography as its mis-fitting corollary. Calling up an indiscriminate range of thinkers and artists— philosophers, composers, photographers, filmmakers, poets—including Ludwig Wittgenstein, Jacques Derrida, Dmitri Shostakovich, Galina Ustvolskaya, Sergio Larraín, Günther Anders, Alejandra Pizarnik, Antonin Artaud, and Friedrich Hölderlin, among many others, the resultant montage repeatedly abandons the reader to an empty, incriminating, theatre.

P1040394

Small Print Editions: La Houle, Meekling Press, Jessica Campbell, & Karsten Lund

Join us on June 24th from 7-9pm for a dedicated selection of readings and discussions around the subject of small press/artist edition publishing practices.

Jessica Campbell is a Canadian artist and enthusiast of books, jokes, and paintings. She is the publications and programming director for Kavi Gupta Gallery, as well as the founder of editions | Kavi Gupta, an art bookstore operated by the gallery. Previous to coming to Chicago, she spent many years working for Drawn & Quarterly, a comic book and graphic novel publisher based in Montreal. She completed her MFA at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, where she was the recipient of the Edward L. Ryerson Fellowship, and she was recently selected as one of NewCity‘s 2015 breakout artists.

La Houle is a Brussels-based publishing structure located 72 miles away from the sea, composed of Marie Lécrivain and Jean-François Caro. From art to fiction, our books try to build bridges between author, translator, artist, and publisher. La Houle will not follow a single path: through various encounters and collaborations, we choose to establish a methodology that will define itself along our publications. La Houle is a non-profit press. Our concern is to find economic ways of making and distributing printed matter, working in close relation to artists’ or writers’ practices.

Karsten Lund lives in Chicago, where he has organized exhibitions at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, the Museum of Contemporary Photography (MoCP), the Hyde Park Art Center, various artist-run spaces, and more unconventional sites, such as an immense factory shortly before its demolition. As an essayist, editor, artist, and curator he is invested in exploring an expanded range of possibilities for art-related publications; since 2007 he has produced experimental publications in conjunction with various projects, collaborated on multiple artist books, and worked on numerous museum exhibition catalogues. Most recently, he is the editor of Irena Haiduk’s Spells, a collection of the artist’s writings forthcoming from Sternberg Press. Lund works as a Curatorial Assistant at MCA Chicago.

meekling

Meekling is a very small press, based in Chicago, Illinois. We specialize in small, hand-made editions of books by authors we adore. We generally publish works that play with or ignore the boundaries of genre. We appreciate humor and beauty and risk-taking, and we see publishing as a collaborative, community-driven adventure

Following Nonhuman Kinds with Marissa Lee Benedict, Lindsey French & Mel Keiser

On June 19th from 7-9pm Marissa Lee Benedict, Lindsey French, and Mel Keiser each present work in relation to Sector 2337’s on-going reading group, Following Nonhuman Kinds. As part of this gathering, attendants are also invited to read:

Tender Buttons, Gertrude Stein (emphasis on Objects and Food sections) http://www.gutenberg.org/files/15396/15396-h/15396-h.htm

– “Telling Friends from Foes in the Time of the Anthropocene,” Bruno Latour (Latour_Anthropocene)

A native of Southern California, Marissa Lee Benedict is a sculptor, researcher, writer, explorer, teacher and avid amateur of many fields and disciplines. Motivated by a sense of critical wonder that is rooted in a practice of research and experimentation, her projects range from growing algae under fluorescent lights to digging up geological core samples in the California desert. Currently based in Chicago, IL, Benedict received a BFA from the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) in 2007 and an MFA in 2011 from the Sculpture Department at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC), where she currently teaches. She has shown most recently in Chicago at threewalls (threewall SOLO), the DePaul Art Museum, Chicago Artists’ Coalition, Harold Washington College, Columbia College, Mana Contemporary, the Sullivan Galleries, and in NYC at the Cue Art Foundation. She is currently an artist-in-residence and mentor for the BOLT Residency program (Chicago Artists Coalition), and was a 2011 recipient of the Joan Mitchell Foundation MFA Fellowship.

LinseyFrench_CactusStill

Lindsey French is an artist and educator whose practice engages in gestures of communication with landscapes and nonhuman organisms. Mediated with sensors and algorithms, the work materializes as texts written in collaboration with trees, video performances of attempted dialogues with the landscape, and sound installations of distant and displaced forests. French has exhibited and presented work at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago, the Chicago Cultural Center, the Pico House Gallery in Los Angeles, Flying Object in Hadley, MA and in conjunction with the International Symposium of Electronics Arts in both Albuquerque and Vancouver. Her work has been featured in essays in Leonardo, the Midwest Society for Acoustic Ecology, and in podcasts on Creative Disturbance. French currently teaches courses that explore new media practices and site specific research at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Life-of-Mels_Book-Two-View_long

Mel Keiser’s work has been included in the Detroit Center for Photography’s New Directions and Catherine Edelman Gallery’s The Chicago Project.  She was named a finalist for the 2015 Luminarts Fellowship and in 2014 was invited to The New York Times 2nd Annual Portfolio Review.  Her work has been published in Newcity Art, Feature Shoot, People’s Photography,  A+, and Manifest Gallery’s International Photography Annual.  Keiser lives and works in Chicago, IL.

snail screening

"Plants, Machines, Animals, and Objects!"

Friday Night Screening

Everywhere we turn, we find a territory of nonhuman things. It is impossible to escape the trace of others—from material structures (plants, machines, animals and objects) to those all but invisible bodies outside the bounds of human perception (atoms, molecules, pollution, viruses, satellites, planets, etc.). To further explore a line of research established by its affiliated reading group Following Nonhuman Kinds, The Green Lantern Press presents a juried screening with cinematic examples of the subjective potential of nonhuman kinds. 

PREVIEW

1. Himali Singh Soin (in collaboration with Dario Villanueva), “The Particle and the Wave” (12:47)

PROGRAM BEGINS
2. Chloë Brown, “Dialogue: Panthera Leo” (3:16)
3. Laura Aish, “The Machine”, (5:14)
4. Laura Cinti “Nanomagnetic Plants” (1:55)
5. Peter Matthews, “The Ocean Moves Through It” (11:34)
6. Matthew C. Wilson, “Forecast” (2:52)
7. Quiet ensemble, “Orienta” (2:45)
8. Sonia Levy, “I Roam” (3:16)

INTERMISSION

9. Max Stocklosa, “More World Material”(15:32)
10. localStyle, “Chew”, (3:33)
11. Gillian Wylde, “A as in Animal” (2:46)
12. NEOZOON, “BUCK FEVER” (5:54)
13. NEOZOON, “MY BBY 8L3W” (3:03)
14. Linda Tegg, “Sheep Actress” (2:58)
15. Filip Kwaitkowski, “Tiera” (2:47)
16. Chloë Brown & Ines Lechleitner, “The Hum” (3:19)
17. Smriti Mehra, “Authanakoota (Banquet)” (13:58)

About the Participants:

Laura Aish is an emerging experimental filmmaker and sound artist based in the Southwest of the UK. Her work utilizes a multidisciplinary approach, often exploring intersections between filmmaking, sound design and performance practice. She is particularly interested with notions surrounding experience and the production of meaning, as well as the process of editing in both sound and film. |

Chloë Brown is an artist and Senior Lecturer/Course Leader in Fine Art at Sheffield Hallam University. She has an MA in Sculpture from Chelsea College of Art, London (1994),and a BA in Fine Art from the University of Reading (1987). She has exhibited widely internationally and from 1995 to 2013 she was a member of The Research Group for Artists Publications (RGAP). |

Dr Laura Cinti is an award-winning research-based artist working with biology, co-founder and co-director of C-LAB—a transdisciplinary bio art collective and organization. C-LAB has been invited to range of international conferences, exhibitions and continues to contribute in publications to broker discussions on the intersections of art and science. Laura has been involved in art projects, exhibitions and workshops with support from the European Commission, scientific institutes, pharmaceutical companies, councils, universities, cultural institutes and commercial partners. Laura has a PhD from UCL (Slade School of Fine Art in interdisciplinary capacity with UCL Centre of Biomedical Imaging), a Masters in Interactive Media: Critical Theory & Practice (Distinction) from Goldsmiths College, University of London and BA (Hons) Fine Art (First Class) from University of Hertfordshire. |

Filip Kwiatkowski was born in Warsaw, Poland and grew up in New York City. After working as a photographer for several years he received his MFA from Art Center College of Design in 2013.  He recently completed a fellowship at the Academy of Media Arts Cologne.  Filip lives and works in Los Angeles, California.|

Sonia Levy is a French artist living in London. After graduating from Villa Arson, École des Beaux–Art de Nice she undertook a post-graduate course in moving images at École Nationale Supérieure des Arts Décoratifs in Paris. Her practice operates at the intersection of art and the natural sciences, and focuses mainly on the nonhumans – nonhuman animals and inorganic others. Currently she is in North-Iceland, hosted by the Húsavík Cetaceans Research Centre at the University of Iceland, working on a project that explores and interrogates human relationships to whales through their residual bones. |

The collaborative localStyle was founded in Amsterdam in 2000 by Marlena Novak and Jay Alan Yim. Using high and low tech means, their intermedia practice includes video, sound installation, interactive installations, live performance with electronics, and audience participation. Their projects explore how territories and boundaries—whether physical or intangible—are constructed, interpreted, and negotiated, via themes as varied as issues of trespass, the mating behavior of hermaphroditic marine flatworms, the sonification of electric fish from the Amazon, and experimental Eurasian blackbird grammar. These works have been presented in festivals, museums, galleries, and alternative venues in more than three dozen cities worldwide (a.o. Amsterdam, Amersfoort, Barcelona, Beijing, Belgrade, Berlin, Boston, Brussels, Budapest, Camden, Chicago, Cologne, Duluth, Eindhoven, Den Haag, Huddersfield, Jerusalem, Linz, London, Mexico City, New York, the Orkney Islands, Richmond, Santa Barbara, Santa Fe, São Paolo, Sarasota, Shanghai, Sittard, Sydney, Szczecin, Tel Aviv, Torino, Toronto, Valencia, and Warsaw). Festival presentations have included the National Art Museum of China’s (NAMOC) TransLife Triennial, STRP Festival, Visioni dal Futuro, Taipei Digital Art Festival and others. Recent projects have been presented in Amsterdam’s Amstelpark, the Muziekgebouw aan ‘t IJ, Caochangdi, Chicago, London, and Shanghai.

Peter Matthews works in solitude in the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. His work explores a contemporary human relationship with the landscape which often sees him working directly in the ocean for hours at a time. His works on paper are typically identified as a scrawling matrix of dynamic layers of lines and text which attempts to record what is to be human in a world which, behind him on dry land, is rapidly changing and living out of synch with nature. His work has been shown in numerous group exhibitions which explore notions of time, place, space, the landscape. Matthews has shown his work at the Drawing Center, NY, the Pratt Manhattan Gallery, NY, the North Carolina Museum of Contemporary Art, the Künstlerhaus Dortmund, Germany and the Forum Factory, Berlin among others museums and galleries. He has had solo shows at the James Cohan Gallery, NY, Mendes Wood DM, Sao Paulo and Beers London, London, UK. Peter Matthews reached his BA Fine Art and MFA from the Nottingham Trent University, England. |

Smriti Mehra is a video artist who lives and works in Bangalore, India. She completed her MFA in Media Art from NSCAD University in Canada with a scholarship from the AAUW Educational Foundation. She is presently an artist-in-residence at the Centre for Experimental Media Art and she also teaches at the Srishti School of Art, Design and Technology where she studied as an undergraduate. Smriti’s more recent pre-occupation has been with flowers and tracing their journeys. In doing so she uncovers the economic, aesthetic, emotional and transcendental spaces they occupy. The trail also acquaints us with the plethora of people whose hands they pass through and their rituals of labour. Her video works have played at many festivals including ‘Voices from the Waters’ in Bangalore, ‘The Images Festival’ and ‘Monitor’ in Toronto, the ‘Made in Video’ festival in Denmark and ‘Images De l Inde’ at the Centre Pompidou in France. |

NEOZOON, founded 2009 is a female art collective based in Germany and France. |

The research of Quiet ensemble goes through the observation of the balance between chaos and control, nature and technology, creating subjects that perfectly merges the those elements, elements that take form from the relation of organic and artificial subjects, moving the attention to insignificant and wonderful elements, like the movement of a fly or the sound of trees. The interest is connected to those technologies that explores the aesthetic and conceptual possibilities deriving from interactivity techniques, approaching the newest technological discoveries as if they would be the tools for creation, like the brush for the painter. Working on the relation between time and space, sound and image the work of Quiet ensemble changes and develops in time, relating to the space, changing it. Emphasizing the unexpected events, refuting the apparent immobility of shapes and melting the appearing opposition of forces in nature. Concrete and abstract shapes are sectioned and remodeled in hybrid forms and balances, parallel giving great importance to the pure aesthetics of forms. Quiet ensemble is born in 2009 from the meeting between Fabio Di Salvo | Bernardo Vercelli. |

Himali Singh Soin is a collective that utilizes the word in various mediums. As a poet, she renders language in space and often beyond the page. Her work has been published in journals and anthologies worldwide, including The Yellow Nib, published by the Seamus Heaney Centre for Poetry, Prairie Schooner, Eclectica among others. She has self-published a book of poems supported by The India Foundation for the Arts. As a literary curator, she has constructed shows around literary traditions such as the Oulipo and the practice of writing aesthetic manifestos. As a critic, she writes for Artforum, Bomb, Artslant, Vogue and Take on Art among others. Selected credits as a text artist include Hoax Journal online, Kona and Devi Art Foundation in Delhi and forthcoming at Ha Ha Gallery, Sector 2337 and Bucharest  Art Week. She will be at the ICA in Moscow this autumn on a space mission. |

Max Stocklosa was born and bred in the former East Berlin. Studied art at the UDK Berlin and Emily Carr University, Vancouver. 2006 Co-founder of the publishing collective AKV Berlin. 2012 Co-founder of the research group STRATAGRIDS. In 2012 a residency at the Center For Land Use Interpretation was executed. In 2014 he took part in the Anthropocene project at HKW Berlin as well as the Anthropocene Curriculum. |

Linda Tegg’s work investigates the contingent viewing conditions through which we orient our place in the world. Often mixing direct experience with its representation, Tegg investigates how we arrive at our understanding of the natural and the artificial. The Artist was the Samstag Scholar of 2014, The Georges Mora Foundation Fellow of 2012 and has been the recipient of numerous Australia Council for the Arts and Arts Victoria Grants. She has degrees from The University of Melbourne and RMIT University and is currently an MFA candidate at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Recent Solo exhibitions include; Grasslands, The State Library of Victoria, Melbourne, 2014; Choir, WestSpace, Melbourne 2014; Coexistence, MARSO Galleria, Mexico City, 2012. Selected group exhibitions include; Don’t Talk to Strangers, Random Institute, New York, 2014 and NEW13, Australian Centre for Contemporary Art, Melbourne, 2013. |

Gillian Wylde makes performative work for video and installation. Central to her work is a critical engagement with new technologies and the mediated. Processes of appropriation and post-production are constants through most of the work like perhaps a savage smell or hairy logic. Gillian Wylde is an artist and Senior Lecturer at Falmouth University, UK. |

Matthew C. Wilson is an artist based in New York who works in a variety of media including installation, sculpture, video, and site specific action. His work distills constellations extracted from entwined natural, historical, cultural, and economic processes. Wilson received an MFA in Visual Arts from Columbia University, has been a fellow in the Whitney Museum of American Art’s Independent Study Program, and participated in residencies at the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture and Fondazione Antonio Ratti’s CSAV – Artists Research Laboratory, among others. He is currently working on a long-term collaborative project in association with Jan Van Eyck Academie (Maastricht, NL), Leiden University (Leiden, NL), and the German Archaeological Institute (Berlin, DE). 

 

About the Jurors:

In 1995 Giovanni Aloi obtained his first degree in Fine Art – Theory and Practice, in Milan and moved to London in 1997 where he furthered his studies in Visual Cultures (MA) at Goldsmiths University of London. From 1999 to 2004 he worked at Whitechapel Art Gallery and as a film programmer at Prince Charles Cinema in London whilst continuing to work as freelance photographer. Today he is a Lecturer in History of Art and Visual Cultures at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Sotheby’s Institute of Art London and New York, and Tate Galleries. He lectures on subjects of modern and contemporary art with an emphasis on the representation of nature and animals. In 2006, he founded Antennae, the Journal of Nature in Visual Culture of which he is Editor in Chief. Counting thousands of readers around the world, the Journal is today the international reference point for the debate on animals in the arts. (www.antennae.org.uk) Aloi completed his PhD on ‘taxidermy in contemporary art’ at Goldsmiths University of London in 2014. Art & Animals, his first book part of the series ‘Art &…’ by IB Tauris, was published in November 2011.

Kathleen Kelley is a PhD candidate in philosophy at the New School for Social Research. Her dissertation, Automatism is a Humanism, uses Stanley Cavell’s philosophy to reimagine the status of medium and modernism for current practices. She is also a visiting instructor at Pratt Institute, where she teaches classes on aesthetics, photography, and animals. She lives in Brooklyn with one human, two animals, and six plants.

Trevor Perri received a PhD in philosophy from the University of Leuven in Belgium in 2013. His research has primarily focused on theories of habit, memory, imagination, and art in nineteenth- and twentieth-century continental philosophy. He currently teaches philosophy courses at Loyola University Chicago and works as Associate Editor at The Green Lantern Press.

Caroline Picard is the Executive Director of The Green Lantern Press, and Co-Director of Sector 2337.

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Book Releases for Daniel Borzutzky, Johannes Göransson, Sade Murphy, & Nikki Wallschlaeger

On Friday June 5th at 7pm, we will celebrate new books from Daniel Borzutzky, Johannes Göransson, Sade Murphy, and Nikki Wallschlaeger will give readings. Doors open at 6:30 pm. This event is free.

Daniel Borzutzky is the author of In the Murmurs of the Rotten Carcass Economy (2015), The Book of Interfering Bodies (2011), The Ecstasy of Capitulation (2007) and Arbitrary Tale (2005) His work has been anthologized in, among others, A Best of Fence: The First Nine Years, Seriously Funny, and Malditos Latinos Malditos Sudacas: Poesia Iberoamericana Made in USA. He has also translated books of poetry from Spanish.  He lives in Chicago.
Johannes Göransson is the author of six books, including most recently The Sugar Book (just out from Tarpauin Sky Press), as well as the translator of such Swedish and Finland-Swedish poets as Aase Berg, Johan Jönson and Henry Parland. He teaches at the University of Notre Dame and edits Action Books.
Sade Murphy was raised in Houston but she lives in South Bend. Her poems have recently been published in Lit and Action, Yes. Her first book, Dream Machine, was published by Co*im*press this past winter.
Nikki Wallschlaeger is the author of two chapbooks, Head Theatre (2007) and “I Would Be The Happiest Bird” (2014). Her work has been pubished in Nervehouse, Coconut Poetry, Word Riot, Spork, DecomP and other journals. Her book “Houses” was just published by Horse Less Press. She is currently working on her first full-length manuscript of poems called Crawlspace. She lives in Milwaukee with her spouse and son.
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Hannah B. Higgins, Shawn Michelle Smith, & Ellen Rothenberg in Conversation

on the subject of elsetime

Join us for a conversation about Ellen Rothenberg’s exhibition, elsetime, featuring Rothenberg, Shawn Michelle Smith, and Hannah B. Higgins on May 30th from 5:00-6:30pm. The conversation will be an informal gallery talk and is free and open to the public.

Hannah B. Higgins has been teaching at UIC since 1994. Her research and course topics examine twentieth century avant-garde art with a specific interest in Dadaism, Surrealism, Fluxus, Happenings, performance art, food art and early computer art. Her books and articles argue for the humanistic value of multimodal aesthetic experiences. Higgins is solo author of Fluxus Experience (University of California Press, 2002) and The Grid Book (MIT Press, 2009) and co-editor of with Douglas Kahn of Mainframe Experimentalism: Early Computing and the Foundations of Digital Art (University of California Press, 2012). She has received the UIC University Scholar Award, DAAD, Getty and Philips Collection Fellowships and is co-executor of the Estate of Dick Higgins and the Something Else Press.

Shawn Michelle Smith is Professor of Visual and Critical Studies at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.  She has published several books on the history and theory of photography and gender and race in visual culture. Her most recent book, At the Edge of Sight:  Photography and the Unseen (Duke 2013), won the 2014 Lawrence W. Levine Award for best book in American cultural history from the Organization of American Historians, and the 2014 Jean Goldman Book Prize from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She is currently working on Photographic Returns, a book about contemporary photography invested in the past, and completing a co-edited book with Sharon Sliwinski called Photography and the Optical Unconscious.

Ellen Rothenberg’s work is concerned with the politics of everyday life and the formation of communities through collaborative practices. Her installations and public projects often employ the iconography of social movements and their residual documents to interrogate the mechanisms underlying contemporary political engagement and social dialogue. Her work—architecturally scaled installations, public projects, performance, collaborations, and writing —uncovers histories embedded in the present, particularly those of women, labor, and feminism. Her approach to form and material is informed by these concerns, and inflect meaning beyond their historical conventions. Her work has been presented in North America and Europe at The Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; The Museum of Fine Arts and The Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston; The Museum of London, Ontario; The Contemporary Jewish Museum, San Francisco; The Neues Museum Weserburg, Bremen; Royal Festival Hall, London; The Brukenthal National Museum, Sibiu, Romania; among others. Awards include NEA Regional Fellowships, The Bunting Institute Fellowship Radcliffe College Harvard University, Illinois Arts Council Fellowships, The Massachusetts Artist Foundation Fellowships, and grants from CEC Artslink, The Charles Engelhard Foundation, The LEF Foundation, and NEA Artists Projects. Rothenberg teaches at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago and at the Vermont College Fine Arts Graduate Program.

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Not To Be Taken

Saturday performances from May 16th-June 20th, 2015

As part of Ellen Rothenberg’s current exhibition, elsetimeThe Green Lantern Press presents Not to be Taken a series of Saturday actions.

Not to be Taken Performance Series invites select artists and thinkers to publicly use elsetime as a generative studio space in which she can engage questions about legacy and politics, place and time, through discrete actions; these subjective, ephemeral responses momentarily transform the exhibition with the performer’s unique potential.

Saturday May 16th at 3pm : Tim Kinsella

Saturday May 23rd at 3 pm : Alexandria Eregbu

Saturday May 30th at 3 pm : Dao Nguyen

Saturday June 06 at 3 pm : CLOSED

Saturday June 13 at 3pm : Mark Booth & Becky Grajeda

Saturday June 20th at 3pm : Terri Kapsalis & Anne Elizabeth Moore

Images from previous Not to Be Taken Performances:

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Tim Kinsella, “Not to be Taken,” Performance Still, Sector 2337, May 2015. Photo by Caroline Picard.

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Tim Kinsella, “Not to be Taken,” Performance Still, Sector 2337, May 2015. Photo by Caroline Picard.

Alexandria Eregbu, "Not to be Taken," Performance Still, Sector 2337, May 2015. Photo by Deanna Ledezma .

Alexandria Eregbu, “Not to be Taken,” Performance Still, Sector 2337, May 2015. Photo by Deanna Ledezma .

Alexandria Eregbu, “Not to be Taken,” Performance Still, Sector 2337, May 2015. Photo by Deanna Ledezma .

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Dao Nguyen, “Not to be Taken,” Performance Still, Sector 2337, May 2015. Photo by Caroline Picard.

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Dao Nguyen, “Not to be Taken,” Performance Still, Sector 2337, May 2015. Photo by Caroline Picard.

Not to be Taken Participants:

Mark Booth is an interdisciplinary artist, sound artist, writer, and musician. His work in text, image, and sound explores the material qualities of language, as well as the ways that language functions (and does not function) to describe human experience. Having learned to read and navigate the world as a dyslexic, Booth uses his work to make sense of his own disjointed experience with words and meaning. His art is simultaneously grandiose in scope (attempting (and failing, of course) to describe the entire spectrum of human existence) and comically quotidian. Booth is on the faculty of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. He has exhibited and performed his work in Chicago, nationally, and internationally in a variety of known and obscure venues.

Alexandria Eregbu is a visual artist, whose work often takes shape in the form of performance, programming, and curatorial practices. Her concerns frequently address community, materiality, performativity, and visibility of racialized and gendered bodies in space. In 2012, Eregbu was commissioned by Out of Site Chicago to perform 11/10/10, a project that confronted the physical and geographical boundaries of the city of Chicago. The following year in 2013, Eregbu curated Marvelous Freedom/Vigilance of Desire, Revisited at Columbia College Chicago. This curatorial project reexamined the first Marvelous Freedom/Vigilance of Desire— a Surrealist exhibition that took place in Chicago in 1976. Eregbu’s work has been featured in two solo exhibitions and several group exhibitions including Seminar (New York); Exodus at the University of Chicago’s Arts Incubator in Washington Park; and Mythologies at Sullivan Galleries (Chicago). Eregbu was a recipient of the Propeller Fund Grant (2013), a 2014-2015 Resident Curator with HATCH Projects at Chicago Artists Coalition, and a Public Studio Artist in Residence at the Chicago Cultural Center. Eregbu received her BFA from the School of the Arts Institute of Chicago.

Becky Grajeda is a sound artist, sound designer and sound engineer based in Chicago. Her works of sound assemblage, multi-channel installation and performance frequently include field recordings of the sounds of machinations and/or in involve abstracting vocal inflection, intonation, and intended meaning in speech. She has exhibited and performed her sound work in Chicago, the UK, Finland, and in the Czech Republic. She recently received a grant from the City of Chicago’s Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events to document three of her performative sound works.

Terri Kapsalis is a writer, performer, and cultural critic whose work appears in such publications as Short Fiction, Denver Quarterly, Parakeet, The Baffler, New Formations and Public. She is the author of Jane Addams’ Travel Medicine Kit (Hull-House Museum), The Hysterical Alphabet (WhiteWalls) and Public Privates: Performing Gynecology from Both Ends of the Speculum (Duke University Press) and the co-editor of two books related to the musician Sun Ra. As an improvising violinist, Kapsalis has a discography that includes work with Tony Conrad, David Grubbs, and Mats Gustafsson, and she is a founding member of Theater Oobleck. She works as a health educator at Chicago Women’s Health Center and teaches at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Tim Kinsella is the author of two novels, Let Go and Go On and On (2014, Curbside Splendor) and The Karaoke Singer’s Guide to Self-Defense (2011, Featherproof Books). He has also recently become the publisher and editor at Featherproof Books. Since 1996 his band Joan of Arc and its related projects have released dozens of albums and they continue to tour internationally on a regular basis. Recent projects include multiple commissions for the MCA Chicago and The Museum of Contemporary Photography.

Anne Elizabeth Moore is an internationally renowned cultural critic. Fulbright scholar, UN Press Fellow, USC Annenberg/Getty Arts Journalism Fellow and part of the team behind The Ladydrawers, she has written and edited several award-winning books. Cambodian Grrrl (Cantankerous Titles, 2011) received a Lowell Thomas Travel Journalism Award for best book from the Society of American Travel Writers Foundation in 2012. Hey Kidz, Buy This Book(Soft Skull, 2004) made Yes! Magazine‘s list of “Media That Set Us Free” and Reclaim the Media’s 2004 Media and Democracy Summer Reading List. The first Best American Comics made both Entertainment Weekly‘s “Must List” and Publishers Weekly‘s Bestsellers List. Unmarketable (The New Press, 2007) made Reclaim the Media’s 2007 Media and Democracy Summer Reading list and was named a Best Book of the Year by Mother Jones. Her recent book New Girl Law (Cantankerous Titles, 2013), the follow-up to Cambodian Grrrl, was called “a post-empirical proto-fourth-wave feminist memoir” by BustMoore herself was recently called a “general phenom” by the Chicago Reader and “one of the sharpest thinkers and cultural critics bouncing around the globe today” by Razorcake. More here.

Dao Nguyen is a Chicago-based artist. She choreographs thought experiments, play apparatuses, obstacle courses, and rituals for transformation. A score becomes a map is a situation where objects, actions, and bodies encounter philosophical questions concerning communication, connection, and ontology. Her name is a homophone for the Vietnamese word for knife. She is the compact, red Leatherman multi-tool your aunt gave you for Christmas ten years ago. On sale at Marshall’s. Versatility and hidden strength in a small package at a discount. Stealthy enough to pass through security checkpoints on three continents on four separate occasions. She can cut, screw, file, saw, and open your beer. Bonus applications include carving miniature graphite figurines, picking locks, and sculpting tofu. Nguyen has exhibited and performed in backyards, bathrooms, stairwells, highways, and gallery spaces, including Defibrillator, Hyde Park Art Center, Sullivan Galleries, Los Angeles Municipal Gallery, Brea Art Gallery, The Foundry Arts Centre, and Irvine Fine Arts Center. She received an MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and was recently an Artist-in-Residence at ACRE and Elsewhere: A Living Museum.

Patient Sounds

Patient Sounds + Patient Presses

An Evening / Release Party

At 7pm on May 22nd, we will celebrate new releases from Patient Sounds + Patient Presses. Here will be shared several new releases, some new cassettes, a new chapbook, as well as performances, readings, and live music. Doors open at 6:30pm. This event is free.

Patient Sounds + Patient Presses is a private press record label + book publisher, established in Fort Collins, Colorado in 2009 ~ currently based in Chicago, Illinois. Established first as a means to self-release audio recordings in allegiance to some naive renegade spirit punk ethos, Patient Sounds + Patient Presses has evolved into a project about publishing media in various formats with the same vision. More than 70 cassettes, 6 chapbooks, 4 vinyl releases…

 

Performers:

Tonight, Patient Sounds will release Patient Sounds Audio Poesis Cassettes from the following writers/artists/performers. Along with celebrating the release of these cassettes, several will also be showing, reading, and performing works.
Galen Bebee is a writer and artist based out of Chicago. She is a founder of Etc. Gallery, a digital gallery for web-native experimental narratives, and its imprint, Etc. Press. Find her at etc-gallery.com and @galenbeebe
Elizabeth Bertch writes poems and bakes pies.  She is interested in hybrid movement, performance, and poetry projects.  She is originally from Iowa.
David Hall is an MFA candidate in Writing at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. He is from Los Angeles. He is concerned with exhaustion and failure.
Hannah Keene lives as an indigo bunting. Her work is an unfurling of anti-memoir, an alchemical reaction between myth, landscape, and trauma.
Paula Nacif was born on 19.9167° south of the Equator and 43.9333° west of the Prime Meridian (Cancer rising, ascendant). Now, she is an artist and organizer (1-800-SPACE; g(URL)_FREAX) living in the mid(west)dle and working with digital media, performance and writing. Her work has been shown online and off. She has controlled crowds in Chicago, Illinois.
Willy Smart is an artist and reader currently studying and producing Visual Culture and Sound at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Willy directs the conceptual music label Fake Music.
Grant Souders is a writer and artist from the Rocky Mountain West, and he holds an MFA in Poetry from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop. He is the author of the chapbook, Relative Yard (Patient Sounds, 2013), and a collaborative book with Nathaniel Whitcomb and Matthew Sage, A Singular Continent (Palaver Press, 2014). His work has appeared in the Boston Review, jubilat, Denver Quarterly, and other venues. His first full length collection, SERVICE, is forthcoming from Tupelo Press.
Sammi Skolmoski is a human (we ran tests). More specifically she’s an MFA candidate at
the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, working in writing and fiber and material studies. She likes sounds and sometimes makes them.

 

Music & Sound:

M. Sage is Matthew Sage. He is a weird son of West America. He is an MFA writing candidate at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. His audio experiments explore mixed media sound collage, ambient sound, field recordings, plunderphonics and hauntology as processed by computer interface. He runs Patient Sounds with his wife, Lynette Sage. He writes about dust and mountains and data​.​
The Variable Why is Nick Sherman. He makes music using computer-processed guitar, creating lush and orchestral digital arrangements that evoke deep space atmospheres. He is based in Chicago, but has coordinates set for the sun.

 

Chapbook Release:

Patient Presses are proud to announce the release of “Bodies Found” by Kylie McLaughin. This was the entry that won the first ever Patient Presses Poetry Chapbook Contest.
Kylie McLaughin grew up in Somerville, Massachusetts, and holds a BA in English from Harvard College, as well as an MFA in Poetry from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop. Recent poems of hers can be found in DIAGRAM and CutBank. Her first chapbook, BODIES FOUND, is available through Patient Sounds, Intl.
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Devin Johnston and Ted Mathys

Poetry Reading

At 7pm on May 21st, Devin Johnston and Ted Mathys will read from their new books–Far-Fetched and Null Set. Doors open at 6:30pm. This event is free.

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(C) Juno Gemes

Born in 1970, Devin Johnston spent his childhood in North Carolina. He is the author of four previous books of poetry and two books of prose, including Creaturely and Other Essays. He works for Flood Editions, an independent publishing house, and teaches at Saint Louis University in Missouri.

Photo: Jessica Baran

Photo: Jessica Baran

Ted Mathys is the author of two previous books of poetry, The Spoils and Forge, both from Coffee House Press. Originally from Ohio, he holds an MFA from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and lives and teaches in St. Louis.

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Chicago Review Release Party

Readings from Lisa Fishman and Chris Glomski

At 7pm on May 15th, we will celebrate the release of the new issue of Chicago Review. Lisa Fishman and Chris Glomski will give readings. Doors open at 6:30pm. This event is free.

Lisa Fishman’s most recent book is 24 Pages and other poems (Wave Books). Earlier books include F L O W E R  C A R T, Current, and The Happiness Experiment, all on Ahsahta Press. She lives in southern Wisconsin and teaches at Columbia College Chicago.

 

Chris Glomski’s most recent poetry collection, The Nineteenth Century, was published by The Cultural Society in 2011. A chapbook, Eidolon, was issued by Answer Tag Home Press in 2008. He is also the author of Transparencies Lifted from Noon (MEB / Spuyten Duyvil Press, 2005). His poems, translations, and critical writings have appeared in Notre Dame Review, The Literary Review, Jacket, A Public Space, Chicago Review, Precipitate and elsewhere. He lives in Oak Park, IL.

 

The new issue of Chicago Review is available in March/April 2015. It features: A forum on recent actions in response to sexism, misogyny, and sexual assault in literary communities; Poems by Jean Day, Tyrone Williams, Rob Halpern, Jacqueline Waters, David Hadbawnik, Joel Felix, Cole Swensen, Jacob Rakovan, Whit Griffin, and Andrea Brady; Fictionby Mika Seifert, Claire Harlan Orsi, and Lidija Dimkovska (translated by Christina E. Kramer); Essays on what lies beneath in the second Aldine Petrarch, 1514, by Alba Page, on documentary poetry by Jill Magi, on the lyric by George Albon, and on conceptual poetry by Kent Johnson; Stephanie Anderson’s interviews with Hettie Jones, Margaret Randall, and Maureen Owen on small-press poetry publishing

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Acknowledgements Book Release

Readings from Brandon Wilner and Willy Smart, Jesse Malmed, and James T. Green

At 7pm on May 14th, we will celebrate the release of Brandon Wilner and Willy Smart’s Acknowledgements, out from Publication Studio. Wilner, Smart, Jesse Malmed, and James T. Green will give readings. Doors open at 6:30pm. This event is free.

acknowledgements_pressrelease (1)Brandon Wilner and Willy Smart met in New Harmony, Indiana in the summer of 2012 and have seen each other only three times since. They co-run a reissue label called Fake Music Re-Anticipations and with their new book, Acknowledgements, they want to put you in the driver’s seat.

Jesse Malmed is an artist and curator working in video, performance, text, occasional objects and their gaps and overlaps. Various pre-occupations include: Choir Conductor, Loveable Slouch, Paranoiac Research Assistant, Comic Concierge, Junk Shop Salesman, Re-Titler, Poet-Comedian, Traffic Caller, Bootlegger, Idiot’s Idiot, Infinite Gesticulator, Pro Bono Closed Captioner and Imaginary Television Host. He has performed, screened and exhibited at museums, microcinemas, film festivals, galleries, bars and barns, including solo presentations at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, Museum of Contemporary Photography, the Portland Art Museum’s Northwest Film Center, University of Chicago Film Studies Center, Sight Unseen, Spectacle Theater, Artists’ Television Access, Microlights, Lease Agreement, Skylab Gallery and Chicago Filmmakers. In addition to his own work, Jesse programs at the Nightingale Cinema, co-directs the mobile exhibition space and artist bumper sticker project Trunk Show and has programmed work in a wide variety of contexts individually, as a member of Cinema Project and as the peripatetic Deep Leap Microcinema. His writing has appeared in Incite Journal, YA5, OMNI Reboot, Big Big Wednesday, Temporary Art Review, Bad at Sports and Cine-File. A native of Santa Fe, Jesse earned his BA at Bard College and his MFA at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He was named a “2014 Breakout Artist” by Newcity and is a 2014-15 Artistic Associate at Chicago’s Links Hall, where he is organizing LIVE TO TAPE, a week-long festival of artist television May 18-24, 2015www.jessemalmed.net

James T. Green is a designer by trade and an artist by practice–making work that explores identity through new media, writing, object-making, and performance. His work has been shown in EXPO Chicago (2012, 2013, 2014), the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art (2013), the Chicago Cultural Center (2012), and the Gene Siskel Film Center in Chicago (2013). Green is currently an artist in residence at the University of Chicago Arts & Public Life/CSRPC residency program and has completed residency programs at ACRE (2011-2012) and Chicago Artist Coalition’s HATCH Projects (2012-2013). In 2013, Green helped to organize the Filter Photo Festival in Chicago and in 2014 was selected to perform at The Chicago Home Theater Festival. http://www.jamestgreen.com/

paraecologies

PsychoEcologies: A BioSemiotic Salon

April 25th at 7pm: Please join us for a selection of final projects from the Biological Semiotics course at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, led by Andrew Yang. Collectively the class has explored the sensory and experiential worlds of various creatures —from bat echolocation to artificial intelligence, Descartes to Alan Turing.

Presentations will include readings, video, performance, and discussion:

—Biomimetic Curatorial Practice: Learning from Sociable Weaver Birds (Hannah Green, Allison Jones, and Zahri Nicole Vafaee) : Can the collective nesting habits of social birds provide a novel model for arts curation?

— The Drag-Queen Cuttlefish and other Stories (Ana Vázquez, Joanna Suhayda, and Ailsa Stevenson): Readings from an adult-children’s book about the sensory worlds of various animals.

—Form Follows Function (Madeline Vaccaro and Ryer Appledoorn): An exploration of human reasons and resonances behind animal architectures, human and non-human alike.

—Becoming Your Meaning (Connie West and Kaleigh Moynihan) : A sculptural, fabric, live performance exploring visual and physical communication human/cuttlefish.

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Swimming Pools Book Release

Readings from Jeff Sherfey and Leila Wilson

At 7pm on April 22nd, we will celebrate the release of Jeff Sherfey’s Swimming Pools, out from Polyploid Press. Sherfey and Leila Wilson will give readings. Doors open at 6:30pm. This event is free.

Jeffrey Sherfey

Jeff Sherfey is a poet currently living light on the land. He operates two projects in their inchoate form: The Library Cormorant and The Latest School of Correspondence. His first book of poetry, Swimming Pools, is published by Polyploid Press.

Leila Wilson

Leila Wilson is the author of The Hundred Grasses (Milkweed Editions, 2013), finalist for the Kate Tufts Discovery Award.  She is the recipient of a Friends of Literature Prize from Poetry Foundation, and her poems and essays have appeared in Iowa Review, Chicago Review, Poetry, A Public Space, American Letters and Commentary, and elsewhere.  She teaches creative writing and literature at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, where she also runs the Writing Center.

 

Polyploid Press is a small press that publishes poetry, experimental writing, and other curiosities, always with a discerning eye for style and aesthetic. Swimming Pools acts as the press’s debut. The book is in two parts. The first part collects nine untitled poems that explores suburban (and sometimes urban) imagery and ideology. The second part is an expansive collage poem that finds its cohesion in the Lakota figure Crazy Horse. Swimming Pools features illustrations by Chicago artist Nick Jackson.

 

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Material Immaterialities

Waveforms

Waveforms at Sector 2337 April 17th, 6-9pm

Sound is at once resolutely material — fixed in the world of things — and immaterial — less a thing than a swerve. This interdisciplinary group exhibition will investigate this flutter and the staging of sound in a visual arts context. Featuring Samantha Fickel, Rebecca Himelstein, Alix Anne Shaw, April MartinAllyson Packer, Felipe Fideles Steinberg, Erika Raberg, Zach Lovitch, Sadie Woods, Alex Drosen, Neal Markowski, and organized by Anna Orlikowska and Willy Smart. Waveforms is a semesterly event programmed by the Sound Department of SAIC.

Willy Smart is an artist and reader currently studying and producing Visual Culture and Sound at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Willy directs the conceptual music label Fake Music (fakemusic.org).

Anna Orlikowska is a visual artist based in Chicago and Amsterdam. She is currently an MFA candidate at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She exhibited her work in the Netherlands, US, Denmark, Germany and Brasil.

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Please Don’t Bury Me Alive! (Action, Lecture, Screening)

April/May Artists in Residence: Josh Rios & Anthony Romero

At 7pm on April 16th, Josh Rios and Anthony Romero will present Part One of Please Don’t Bury Me Alive!—a performative lecture that brings various gestures associated with pedagogy and theater together in a zone of imaginative investigation, a zone where diverse interests like speculative Chicana/o futures and the Othering of Modernism can co-mingle in uncommon and unpremeditated ways. Doors open at 630 pm. This event is free.

While in residence at Sector 2337, Josh Rios and Anthony Romero will present a two-part project titled Please Don’t Bury Me Alive!. Part One, a performative lecture, brings various gestures associated with pedagogy and theater together in a zone of imaginative investigation, a zone where diverse interests like speculative Chicana/o futures and the Othering of Modernism can co-mingle in uncommon and unpremeditated ways. Part Two, an installation staged in the project space, draws on vernacular forms of picture collecting and display indicative of mood boards, bulletin boards, and other casual approaches to aggregating images and objects. Specifically, the installation embraces the visual pleasure of presenting and arranging an excess of Chicana/o centered images where they would not appear otherwise.

Anthony Romero and Josh Rios, both originally from south Texas, now live and work in Chicago. Over the past several years they have been developing various performances, 2 and 3 dimensional works, curatorial projects, installations, writings, and screenings that deal with the experience of being US citizens of Mexican origin in these challenging times. Broadly speaking, their collaborative works center on contemporary Chicana/o aesthetics, the elided histories of the Chicana/o struggle, and the dismissal of Chicana/o contributions to US culture in general.

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Structures Deployed: Fo Wilson & Ira S. Murfin

Featuring two presentations & one performance

At 7pm on Friday, April 03 Ira S. Murfin and Fo Wilson will each present short talks about structure in their respective fields, and then together present Murfin’s table-performance piece, Our Theatrical Future: A Talk Duet Between Hong Kong and Chicago (Re-Performed).

Artist Talk: (Fo Wilson)

Wilson will present a few examples of her work within the context of furniture and domesticity that question the role that objects play in domestic space and how we project our own identities and desires on them. She’ll also discuss how objects can not only have function, but exhibit behavior as a reflection of the human condition.

Lecture: Talk Shows: Talk as Performance Material (Ira Murfin)

This lecture introduces the cross-disciplinary history and possibilities of talk as a performance genre. It is based in a comparative historical project exploring the use of ordinary, extemporaneous talk by artists from disparate disciplinary backgrounds working in the post-1960s American avant-garde. These artists used talk to both position themselves within disciplinary structures where their work could be received and circulated, and to remain outside the formal limitations of disciplinary traditions and expectations. By putting their minimalist tendencies into tension with the institutional and media formations that articulated and circulated their work, Murfin argues that these artists were able to both keep open and foreclose the expansive possibilities promised by avant-gardes of previous decades. The talk surveys this idiosyncratic cross-disciplinary history and gleans from it models for materializing talk in performance practice and re-imagining the role of arts categories, while also hinting at a an interrelated repertoire of talk performance circulating outside the art world in performance genres that define public life, like pedagogy, popular culture, and public discourse. Ultimately, Murfin asks if talk can be distinguished as a performance media apart from cognate examples such as dramatic text, and traces how talk performance has been identified and deployed across genres.

Performance: Our Theatrical Future: A Talk Duet Between Hong Kong and Chicago (Re-Performed)

Conceived by Ira S. Murfin

Created by Ira S. Murfin with Aaron Kahn + Guest Artists

Performed by Ira S. Murfin + Guest Artist (Fo Wilson)

Ira is a graduate student in Chicago. Aaron is a yoga instructor in Hong Kong. They have been making theatre together and not making theatre together for over 20 years. On December 10th 2014 in Chicago and December 11th 2014 in Hong Kong they had a conversation via video chat over the internet, in the way it is possible to do now. They talked about theatre they have made together and theatre they have not made together and theatre they might make together someday. At each performance of Our Theatrical Future a different Guest Performer from a distinct artistic background joins Ira onstage to re-perform his conversation with Aaron, and Ira and the guest have a conversation of their own about making art and not making art, or whatever else comes up.

 

About the Participants:

Ira S. Murfin is a Chicago-based writer, theatre artist and scholar. He is currently a doctoral candidate in the Interdisciplinary PhD in Theatre & Drama at Northwestern University, where his dissertation examines talk-based performances in the post-1960s American avant-garde. He also holds degrees in writing from New York University and the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Critical and creative writing has appeared in Theatre Topics, Theatre Journal, Theatre Research International, Review of Contemporary Fiction, 491, elimae, Fiction at Work, Chicago Art Criticism, Chicago Arts Journal, and Requited, where he is now also the Performance Editor.  His solo and collaborative performance work has been seen at MCA Chicago, Links Hall, the Rhinoceros Theatre Festival, and the Chicago Cultural Center, among other places. Ira is a member of two ongoing theatrical laboratories: The Laboratory for Enthusiastic Collaboration (LEC), a collective concerned with the unique phenomenon of the performance event, and the Laboratory for the Development of Substitute Materials (LDSM), which makes collaborative performances about cities and science. He is currently a Chicago Shakespeare Theater PreAmble Scholar and a Graduate Affiliate of the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities, this summer he will be a 2015 Humanities Without Walls Pre-Doctoral Fellow.

Fo Wilson is a maker, educator, independent curator and writer. She uses furniture forms to create experiences that reposition historical objects and/or aesthetics in a contemporary context, and offers audiences new ways of thinking about and interacting with history and objects. Fo received her MFA from the Rhode Island School of Design’s Furniture Design program in 2005 with a concentration in Art History, Theory and Criticism and is an Associate Professor at Columbia College Chicago. She has been a recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts grant, and her design work is included in the collection of The Cooper Hewitt National Museum of Design in New York.

 

 

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Her 37th Year

A Noemi Press Book Release with Suzanne Scalon & Brent Armendinger

Sat, March 28th, at 7pm, to celebrate the publication of Suzanne Scanlon’s HER 37TH YEAR, AN INDEX (Noemi Press), thirty-seven women writers, artists, actors and thinkers will gather at Sector 2337 for a polyvocal, overlapping, fragmented reading of an indexed text. Another Noemi Press author, Brent Armendinger will also read from his new book, The Ghost in Us Was Multiplying (Noemi Press).
HER 37TH YEAR, AN INDEX is the story of a year in one woman’s life. Structured as an index, the work is a collage of excerpted conversations, letters, quotations, moments, and dreams. An exploration of longing and desire, the story follows a moment of crisis in a marriage and in the life of a woman who remains haunted by an unassimilable past.
Where does one body end and another begin? In The Ghost in Us Was Multiplying, Brent Armendinger explores the relationship between ethics and desire, between what is intimate and what is public. Although grounded in lyric, these poems are ever mindful of how language falls apart in us and – perhaps more importantly – how we fall apart in language. Armendinger asks, “What ratio of news and light should a poem deliver?” This book is a continuous reckoning with that question and the ways that we inhabit each other.

Suzanne Scanlon is the author of Promising Young Women (Dorothy, 2012). She lives in Chicago.

Brent Armendinger is the author of two chapbooks, Undetectable (New Michigan Press, 2009) and Archipelago (Noemi Press, 2009). His work has recently appeared in Aufgabe, Bloom, Colorado Review, Denver Quarterly, and Web Conjunctions. Brent is a recipient of fellowships from Headlands Center for the Arts and Squaw Valley Community of Writers. He lives in Los Angeles and teaches at Pitzer College, where he is an Associate Professor of English and World Literature.

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Official Book Release for Sonnenzimmer's "Didactics"

Jack Henrie Fisher will present a draft of a slide show titled “The book as value form: 10 contradictions,” enumerating a set of cases in which the book-as-commodity produces and reflects formal ruptures in the political economy. Fisher’s talk is followed by an improvisational musical featuring Keefe Jackson (tenor sax), Jason Roebke (double bass), and Jordan Martins (pedal steel, guitar). That group will use the 18 steps of Formal Additive Programs that Sonnenzimmer printed in Didactics (basically a set of poetic instructions towards abstraction) via an improvised performance.

Jack Henrie Fisher is a graphic designer and writer who works within and against a variety of publishing platforms. He seeks in each instance of practice to locate or invent a position from which the graphic designer is compelled, or compels another, to speak. He is a partner in the design studio Other Forms and an associate professor of design at the University of Illinois at Chicago.
Keefe Jackson saxophonist/clarinetist/improvisor/composer, arrived in Chicago in 2001 from his native Fayettevile, Arkansas. He performs regularly in the U.S. and in Europe with many musicians including Pandelis Karayorgis, Tomeka Reid, Jason Roebke, Anton Hatwich, and Christoph Erb in groups such as the Fast Citizens, Project Project and Likely So. Bill Meyer, writing in the Chicago Reader, commended: “…the impeccable logic of his lines and the richness of his tone leave you wanting more… Jackson’s high-register squiggles and coarsely voiced, rippling runs push the limits of the tenor’s tonal envelope.” Frank van Herk, writing in de Volkskrant (Amsterdam), asserted that “…[Jackson] has an old-fashioned, warm-woolly sound, and a feeling for melodic lines that take their time in unfolding.” He has placed in the DownBeat Critics Poll in the Rising Star Tenor Saxophone category. Recordings are available on Delmark and Clean Feed Records.
Jordan Martins is a Chicago based visual artist, curator, educator, and musician. He received his MFA in visual arts from the Universidade Federal da Bahia in Salvador, Brazil in 2007 and has been an instructor at North Park University since 2008. He co-founded the Comfort Music series in 2011, and is currently co-director of the Comfort Station, where he oversees general programming, gestates new projects, and coordinates partnerships with outside organizations and artists. Martins’s visual work is based in collage processes, including mixed media two dimensional work, photography, video and installation. His recent work is primarily concerned with visual codes, camouflage, and gestalt theory. As a musician Martins collaborates with Angela James and Quarter Mile Thunder, in addition to improvised performances with musicians from varied backgrounds. He directed the Relax Attack Jazz Series from 2011-2013, and is currently on the programming committee for the Chicago Jazz Festival.
Jason Roebke has been a integral part of the Chicago jazz scene since locating to the city in 1999. He composes music for two ensembles, Jason Roebke Combination and the Jason Roebke Octet. Solo performance and a duo with dancer Ayako Kato are also at the forefront of his creative activities. His improvisations are intensely physical, audacious, and sparse. The Chicago Reader described his work as “a carefully orchestrated rummage through a hardware store.”
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Structures Employed: Kelly Kaczynski & Ira S. Murfin

Featuring two presentations & one performance from Kelly Kaczynski & Ira Murfin

At 7pm on Friday, March 13 Ira S. Murfin and Kelly Kaczynski will each present short talks about structure in their respective fields, and then  together present Murfin’s table-performance piece, Our Theatrical Future.

Artist Talk: (Kelly Kaczynski)

Details TBA

Lecture: Surface Aesthetics: The Table as a Site of Performance (Ira Murfin)

Proceeding from a prompt to discuss a theatrical structure, this talk takes up the recurrence of a minimalist impulse for individual artists to stage formally simple performances seated at tables. Surveying occurrences of this presentational structure across artistic disciplines, Murfin identifies an enduring theatrical format that sets non-dramatic and anti-spectacular performances in quotidian physical circumstances, which are nonetheless formally available to uniquely theatrical relationships and modes of address. Focusing on the case of Spalding Gray, whose use of the table in his autobiographical monologues helped define a performance genre, Murfin examines the development and circulation of Gray’s table performances through their mediated representations and the citational practices of the artists he influenced. More broadly, this talk places Gray’s work within a network of mutually legitimizing table performances that includes intentional artworks by cross-disciplinary performers from John Cage to Bill T. Jones, and the vernacular performance repertoire shared by newscasters, teachers, panelists, interviewers, first dates, and breakfast partners sitting, and performing, at tables. Tracked across time, context, and media the table maintains its authoritative and authenticating force, suggesting the ways that performance structures come to establish and assert themselves, sometimes without even having to settle on their own status as theatre.

Performance: Our Theatrical Future: A Talk Duet Between Hong Kong and Chicago (Re-Performed)

Conceived by Ira S. Murfin

Created by Ira S. Murfin with Aaron Kahn + Guest Artists

Performed by Ira S. Murfin + Guest Artist (Kelly Kaczynski)

Ira is a graduate student in Chicago. Aaron is a yoga instructor in Hong Kong. They have been making theatre together and not making theatre together for over 20 years. On December 10th 2014 in Chicago and December 11th 2014 in Hong Kong they had a conversation via video chat over the internet, in the way it is possible to do now. They talked about theatre they have made together and theatre they have not made together and theatre they might make together someday. At each performance of Our Theatrical Future a different Guest Performer from a distinct artistic background joins Ira onstage to re-perform his conversation with Aaron, and Ira and the guest have a conversation of their own about making art and not making art, or whatever else comes up.

 

About the Participants:

Kelly Kaczynski is an artist working within the language of sculpture. Selected exhibitions include Ortega y Gasset Projects, NY; Soap Factory, MN; Comfort Station, IL; Gahlberg Gallery, IL; threewalls, IL; Hyde Park Art Center, IL; Rowland Contemporary, IL; University at Buffalo Art Gallery, NY; Triple Candie, NY; Islip Art Museum, NY; Josee Bienvenu Gallery, NY; DeCordova Museum, MA; Boston Center for the Arts, MA. Public installations include projects with the Main Line Art Center, Haverford, PA; the Interfaith Center, NY; Institute for Contemporary Art, Boston and the Boston National Historic Parks, MA; Boston Public Library, MA. Curatorial projects include the 2014 exhibitions, Roving Room at Habersham Mills, GA and Virtually Physically Speaking at Columbia College, Chicago, IL and the 2011 exhibition Mouthing (a sentient limb) at the Hyde Park Art Center, Chicago, IL. She received an MFA from Bard College, NY and BA from The Evergreen State College, WA. She has taught with Northwestern University, University of Chicago, University of Illinois, Chicago, University of Pennsylvania and the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Kaczynski currently is a Lecturer with the School of the Art Institute, Chicago, IL.

Ira S. Murfin is a Chicago-based writer, theatre artist and scholar. He is currently a doctoral candidate in the Interdisciplinary PhD in Theatre & Drama at Northwestern University, where his dissertation examines talk-based performances in the post-1960s American avant-garde. He also holds degrees in writing from New York University and the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Critical and creative writing has appeared in Theatre Topics, Theatre Journal, Theatre Research International, Review of Contemporary Fiction, 491, elimae, Fiction at Work, Chicago Art Criticism, Chicago Arts Journal, and Requited, where he is now also the Performance Editor.  His solo and collaborative performance work has been seen at MCA Chicago, Links Hall, the Rhinoceros Theatre Festival, and the Chicago Cultural Center, among other places. Ira is a member of two ongoing theatrical laboratories: The Laboratory for Enthusiastic Collaboration (LEC), a collective concerned with the unique phenomenon of the performance event, and the Laboratory for the Development of Substitute Materials (LDSM), which makes collaborative performances about cities and science. He is currently a Chicago Shakespeare Theater PreAmble Scholar and a Graduate Affiliate of the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities, this summer he will be a 2015 Humanities Without Walls Pre-Doctoral Fellow.

 

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Olivia Cronk & Aaron Kunin

At 7pm on March 7th , Olivia Cronk and Aaron Kunin will give a poetry reading. Doors open at 6:30pm. This event is free.

Olivia Cronk’s first book was Skin Horse (Action Books, 2012). Her recent work has appeared or is forthcoming in Bone Bouquet, Deluge, Dusie, Jubilat, Newfound,  Spolia, Swine, and Tender.Some of her work will be anthologized in Electric Gurlesque. She co-edits The Journal Petra (thejournalpetra.com) with Philip Sorenson and is an instructorof Composition and Creative Writing at Northeastern Illinois University in Chicago.

Aaron Kunin’s new book of poems is Cold Genius (Fence, 2014). He lives in Los Angeles.

 

Ben Estes / Sue Tompkins: Listening Tour

Between 4:30 and 7:00 pm on March 7th, in support of the release of Illustrated Games of Patience, visitors will be able to listen to mp3 players featuring a sonic collaboration between Ben and Sue.

Ben Estes / Sue Tompkins

In support of the release of Ben’s book Illustrated Games of Patience, Ben and Sue both made audio recordings (Ben recorded himself reading from his book, Sue recorded two new pieces specifically for this project), and The Song Cave then put these recordings onto a group of mp3 players to be shipped to each destination.

Ben Estes is the author of the chapbooks Lamp like l’map (Factory Hollow Press), Cymbals (The Song Cave), and 8 Poems (Engineered Garments), and Illustrated Games of Patience (The Song Cave). He currently lives in New York.

Sue Tompkins is an artist and a musician. Using a range of media including collage, painting, performance and typewritten text, her visual practice explores the subtleties of language, relying on an approach akin to concrete poetry. Tompkins’ works have been described as “strung-out exercises in associative free thought: performance poetry that moves from the page to the voice, from speech to song, from song to signal, from signal to pure sound.” Her work has been shown in the 29th Sao Paolo Biennale, at the Hayward Gallery, London, MACBA, Barcelona, ICA, London, Kunsthalle Basel, Tate Modern, London, and many others. Sue lives and works in Glasgow, Scotland.

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T.S. Eliot: Reading Group

Winter/Spring 2015

In tandem with the 100th anniversary of the publication of The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock, Sector 2337 is holding a monthly reading group focusing on the work of T.S. Eliot. The group is still open, and members may drop in and out as they please. For more information please contact Devin at: devin at sector2337 dot com.

The full schedule of dates is: 2/28, 4/4, 4/25, 5/23, and 6/20.

Reading List:

1. 2/28:

Prufrock and Other Observations (1917)

Poems (1920)

Tradition and the Individual Talent

2. 4/4:

The Waste Land (1922)

Hamlet and his Problems

Dante

Blake

3. 4/25:

The Hollow Men (1925)
Ash-Wednesday (1930)
Choruses from ‘The Rock’ (1934)

4. Note time and day change: 6/16 at 6pm:

Murder in the Cathedral (1935)

The Cocktail Party (1949)

Poetry and Drama (1951) 

Anthony Opal & Snežana Žabić

At 7pm on February 27th, Punctum Book authors Anthony Opal and Snežana Žabić will read from their forthcoming books, ACTION and Broken RecordsDoors open at 6:30pm. This event is free.

Anthony Opal

Anthony Opal (b. 1983) is the author of ACTION and founding editor of The Economy. His poems can be found in various magazines and journals: Poetry, Boston Review, Harvard Divinity Bulletin, and elsewhere. He lives near Chicago with his wife and daughter.

Anthony Opal, ACTION

About ACTION “Anthony Opal’s series of unrhymed (or off-rhymed) sonnets begins with a prayer to everything or anything—from a lower case “god” to a “compassionate sloth” and a “homeless zoo keeper.” In these poems reverence and rebellion, desperation and control joust. Then they dance. Opal’s lines are consistently surprising (if that’s possible) and, more important, they make me believe them.” -RAE ARMANTROUT, author of Just Saying and recipient of the Pulitzer Prize

“If you’ve ever opened the hood of a car and found a motor of flowers or opened a closet and out flew a flock of waxwings, monarchs, and philosophers, you’ll be prepared for these poems. Otherwise, reader, get ready for the brilliant onslaught of these prayerful evocations, these rollercoaster sonnets, these radiant affirmations of life and art.” -DEAN YOUNG, author of Bender: New and Selected Poems

“’I write sonnets empty of everything yet containing all things…’ goes a visual and philosophical echo of the unutterable ‘G–d’ ACTION interrogates, prods. Such slippery refrains drive this lively book’s composition and arguments. Birds fall throughout, echoing the rough descent of haloed, winged things; the speaker wrestles an angel by a river and, in a later poem, a father by a sink; prophets stumble about stripped of epic context, conscripted to a world of Doritos bags, iPhones, and prescription meds. Indeed, religion and the sacred’s place in the contemporary are on Opal’s mind. For as much as, say, ‘Out of the Whirlwind’ might aver otherwise, these adroit and contemplative poems don’t only fuck with ‘ideas of the holy,’ they seek them out. -DOUGLAS KEARNEY, author of Patter and The Black Automaton

“Opal’s eye mocks its own seeing. With a ‘strange mercy that pulls us inward,’ these poems glint from the threads tethering private myth to a larger one. Taut with hope and balancing a heavy humor, this is language carved of a voice that wants to shout lullabies: ‘I want to sing / a song to myself in the silence of / myself.'” -EMILY KENDAL FREY, author of Sorrow Arrow and The Grief Performance

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Snežana Žabić is the author of the short story collection U jednom životu (In a Lifetime), and the bilingual poetry collection Po(eat)ry/Po(jest)zija written with Ivana Percl and illustrated by Dunja Janković. She edits Packingtown Review, and occasionally blogs at Spurious Bastard.

About Broken Records (Forthcoming from Punctum Books, Winter 2015)
In 1991, Snežana Žabić lost her homeland and most of her family’s book and record collection during the Yugoslav Wars that had been sparked by Slobodan Milošević’s relentless pursuit of power. She became a teenage refugee, forced to flee Croatia and the atrocities of war that had leveled her hometown of Vukovar. She and her family remained refugees in Serbia until NATO bombed Belgrade in 1999.

After witnessing the first nights of NATO’s bombing, Žabić took flight again. She moved from country to country, city to city, finally settling in Chicago. She realized — reluctantly, because she didn’t want to relive the past — that she had to write about what had happened, what she had left behind, and what she had lost. Broken Records is the story of this loss, told with unflinching honesty, free of sentimentality or sensationalism. For the very first time, we learn how it felt to be first a regular teenager during the breakup of Yugoslavia and the ensuing wars, and then a 30-something adult, perennially troubled by one’s uprooted existence.

Broken Records is not a neat narrative but a bit of everything — part bildungsroman, part memoir, part political poetry, part personal pop culture compendium. And while Žabić represents a Yugoslav diasporan subject, her book also belongs to an international generation whose formative years straddle the Cold War and the global reconfiguration of wealth and power, whose lives were spent shifting from the vinyl/analog era to the cyber/digital era. This generation knows that when they were told about history ending, they were told a lie.

Punctum Books is an open-access and print-on-demand independent publisher dedicated to radically creative modes of intellectual inquiry and writing across a whimsical para-humanities assemblage.

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Following Nonhuman Kinds: Reading Group

Winter/Spring 2015

Following Nonhuman Kinds, a reading group that started at Latitude last September, will continue through June at Sector 2337. Although the group is now closed, you can follow and participate with us via our online forum designed to run in tandem with the offline meetings. The group is hosted on Facebook where the readings are supplied to all group members. Please join to contribute your thoughts and responses. The final session, on Friday June 19th, is open to the general public featuring a few readings and select presentations from members of the group; details TBD. A direct link to the online group is HERE.

Topic: Everywhere we turn, we find a territory of nonhuman things. It is impossible to escape the material din of others—from material structures: plants, robots, animals and objects, to those all but invisible bodies outside the bounds of human perception: atoms, molecules, pollution, viruses, satellites, planets et al. While humanity has historically identified itself as something categorically superior to all else, this reading group examines texts, theories, and works of art that challenge the theoretical terms with which we engage our landscape. Following Nonhuman Kinds pursues the complicated strangers among us, ignoring hierarchical conventions in order to reframe and reconsider the interstitial, interspecies web we inhabit. Organized by Caroline Picard, with texts suggested by members of the reading group and co-curated by Rebecca Beachy, Karsten Lund, and Andy Yang, the reading group will discuss the work of Jane Bennett, Bruno Latour, Timothy Morton, Jennifer Moxely, Gertrude Stein, Vanessa Watts, Apichatpong Weerasethakul, and others. Following Nonhuman Kinds is a direct continuation of a symposium that took first place in Bourges, France in April of 2014, and continued at Latitude last fall.

Schedule: The first meeting will take place on Thursday, February 19th. After that, meetings will take place on alternating Wednesdays starting March 4th, except for April 28th, which is a Tuesday. The final meeting will be on Friday, June 19th with artist presentations by Marissa Benedict, Lindsey French, and Mel Keiser. The full list of dates is: 2/19, 3/4, 3/18, 4/1, 4/15, 4/28, 5/13, 5/27, 6/10, and 6/19. All meetings take place from 7:30-9:30 PM.

Readings: These will be emailed to participants in PDF format in advance of each session. Additionally, participants can should plan on procuring 5 books included on this list (indicated by an “*”) on their own.

1. Thursday, February 19th @7:30 pm: There Are Things We Live Among,  Jennifer Moxley, Flood Editions.*

2. Wednesday, March 4th @7:30pm
– Tropical MaladyApichatpong Weerasethakul (film)
-“Romanticism and the life of Things: Fossils, Totems and Images,” WJT Mitchell
-“How The Light Gets Out,” Michael Graziano

3. Wednesady, March 18th @ 7:30pm:
-“Play of Signification: Coyotes Sing in the Margins,” Natasha Seegert
-“Why Look at Animals,” John Berger

4. Wednesday, April 1st @ 7:30pm:
– “The Movement and Habits of Climbing Plants,” Darwin
– “An introduction to phytosemiotics: Semiotic botany and vegetative sign systems,” Kalevi Kull

5. Wednesday, April 15th @ 7:30pm
– “Lives of the Monster Plants,” T.S. Miller
– “Should Trees Have Standing?” Christopher Stone
– “Biocommunication of Plants,” Witzany/Baluska
– “Botanically Queer,” Catriona Sandilands (vimeo)

6.Tuesday,  April 28th @ 7:30pm:  Steven Shaviro, The Universe of Things (University of Minnesota Press)*

7. Wednesday, May 13th @ 7:30pm
-“Decolonial Dreams,” Zoe Todd
-“Mountain/s: An Object Oriented Reading” Anthony Opal
-“Indigenous place-thought & agency amongst humans and non-humans (First Woman and Sky Woman go on a European world tour!),” Vanessa Watts

8. Wednesday, May 27th @ 7:30pm
– The Spell of the Sensuous: Perception and Language in a More-Than-Human World, David Abrams*
–  The Enchantment of Modern Life, Jane Bennett*

9. Wednesady, June 10th @ 7:30pm:  Hyper Objects, Timothy Morton*

10. Friday,  June 19th (Final Meeting) @ 7:30 pm
Tender Buttons, Gertrude Stein (emphasis on Objects and Food sections)
– “Telling Friends from Foes in the Time of the Anthropocene,” Bruno Latuor
– With select artist presentations from Marissa Lee Benedict, Mel Keiser,  and others.

About the organizers:

Born in Denver, Colorado, Rebecca Beachy is a recipient of both an MFA in Studio Arts and an MA in Art History from the University of Illinois at Chicago. In Chicago, her sculptures, interventions and installations have been exhibited at Iceberg Projects, 6018NORTH, the Southside Hub of Production, and Gallery 400, among other spaces. A recent artist in residence at the FRISE Künstlerhaus of Hamburg’s Altona, Rebecca has since been collaborating on a new Chicago residency for German artists through Chicago/Hamburg Sister Cities Exchange. Her written work has been published with literary journal Puerto del Sol and will be included in the Center for Humans & Nature’s upcoming City Creatures compilation (Univ. of Chicago Press, Spring 2014). In addition to teaching at ChiArts, she works as a volunteer specimen preparator and educator, where she demonstrates taxidermy to the public at the Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum for the Chicago Academy of Sciences, Department of Collections.

Karsten Lund has worked as a curator, writer, and artist since 2007, after completing an MA at the University of Chicago. He is currently a Curatorial Assistant at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, where he has organized multiple exhibitions, including the forthcoming Chicago Works: Sarah and Joseph Belknap, and assisted on a dozen others, including The Way of the Shovel: Art as Archaeology and This Will Have Been: Art, Love & Politics in the 1980s. Alongside his work at the MCA, Karsten pursues a wide array of independent projects, often as a means to explore experimental approaches, collaborative structures, or more open-ended propositions. Most recently, he guest curated Phantoms in the Dirt, for the Museum of Contemporary Photography at Columbia College Chicago (July 24-October 5). Past projects have been presented at the Hyde Park Art Center, Peregrine Program, and an immense factory shortly before its demolition, among other locations. As a writer and editor, Karsten has a strong interest in the essay as a creative form and he continues to explore new directions and alternative formats for exhibition catalogues and artist-driven publications.

Caroline Picard is an artist, writer and curator who explores the figure in relation to systems of power though on-going investigations of inter-species borders, how the human relates to its environment and what possibilities might emerge from upturning an anthropocentric world view. To further accent the porousness of borders and bounds, Picard’s projects manifest in a variety of cross-disciplinary mediums including curation, painting, video, administrative practices, interviews with artists, works of fiction, comics, and critical essays. She writes regularly for the Art21, Artslant, and Art Forum, and was the 2014 Curatorial Fellow at La Box, ENSA in Bourges France for her project, Ghost Nature.

Andrew Yang’s research practice explores a range of themes across the evolution & development of form and natural history. His work can be found in journals such as Biological Theory and Gastronomica, and exhibited in Germany, Japan, and throughout the US. He studied zoology and philosophy of science at Duke University (PhD) and visual arts and the Lesley University College of Art and Design (MFA). He is an Associate Professor at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago a Research Associate at the Field Museum of Natural History.

 

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Daviel Shy & The Ladies Almanack

A Presentation from Dec/Jan Artist-in-Residence

On February 18th at 7pm, Daviel Shy will give a short presentation about the work she did during her winter residency at Sector 2337  for her forthcoming feature film The Ladies Almanack.

 

For three weeks between 2014 and 2015, Daviel Shy was a resident artist at Sector 2337. During that time she developed the storyboards, props, and costumes for her forthcoming feature length film adaptation of The Ladies Almanack by Djuna Barnes. In March, principal photography for the film commences in Paris and will continue this summer in Chicago. The project features artists, writers, and thinkers like Hélène Cixious (as herself), Eileen Myles (as Monique Wittig), Guinevere Turner (as Liane de Pougy), and more.

The Ladies Almanack is a feature-­length experimental narrative film (now in pre-production) written & directed by Daviel Shy, based on the novel of the same title by Djuna Barnes. The film is a kaleidoscopic tribute to women’s writing through the friendships, jealousies, flirtations and publishing woes of authors and artists in 1920’s Paris. Here you will find profiles of the artists who make up the film’s cast and crew.

Daviel Shy —a writer, performer, and filmmaker, born on April 14, 1984 in Panorama City, California, she grew up on the west and east coasts with five siblings, spending her childhood with them playing ongoing imagination games like “Teen Hall” that would last years, or otherwise drawing all the time and locking herself up in the family RV with a My Little Pony coloring book, coming out of the vehicle parked in the hot Los Angeles driveway, sweat-drenched but with a beautifully finished book ! As an Aries rising Pisces, she possesses the trademark fire qualities of high Energy, Ambition, and Impatience, pinballing across the intersection of a Six-corner Fever and slowing necessarily, deliberately, into privacy, where thoughts often make behind-the-scenes progress until they are ready to Appear, or Shine. In every piece of work is a dedication, implicit or explicit, and in hers, they are clearly love songs for women who have been continuously left out of the story. Her approach begins with historical research and ultimately seeks to revise the canon, blending in her own experiments and fictions, and holding strong to luddite beliefs that aged tools are not dead tools. Daviel currently lives and works in Chicago, hosts a monthly film screening called Lesbian Movie Night Ongoing Project (L.M.N.O.P.), will eventually complete her tattoo series of five wolves, and is working on a novel. She is the Writer and Director of The Ladies Almanack, which will be her first feature film.

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Michael Heller, Peter O'Leary, & Wendy Lee Spacek

On February 5th, @ 7pm, poets Michael Heller, Peter O’Leary, and Wendy Lee Spacek will read. This event is free.

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Michael Heller has published over twenty volumes of poetry, essays, memoir and fiction.  His most recent works are This Constellation Is A Name: Collected Poems 1965-2010 (2012), Beckmann Variations & other poems (2010) and Speaking the Estranged: Essays on the Work of George Oppen(2008, expanded edition, 2012).  His collaborations with the composer Ellen Fishman Johnson include the multimedia works Constellations of Waking (2000), based on the life of Walter Benjamin,This Art Burning (2008) and Out of Pure Sound (2010).  A new collection of poems, Diánoia, is forthcoming in 2016.

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Peter O’Leary’s most recent book is Phosphorescence of Thought, a book-length poem about the evolution of consciousness. A new book of criticism, Thick and Dazzling Darkness: Religious Poetry in a Secular Age, and a new book of poetry, The Sampo, are forthcoming. He lives in Oak Park and teaches at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and at the University of Chicago. He edits Verge Books.

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Wendy Lee Spacek is a poet from Indianapolis, IN. She is a graduate of the Writing Program at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She curates a reading series called the Soft River and works as an arts administrator at a community art school. Her poetry has been published in LVNG Magazine and online through MonsterHousePress.com.

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The New [New] Corpse Film Screening

Curated by Christy LeMaster

Friday, December 19th:: Doors open at 7pm / Program begins at 7:30 / All Sector 2337 events are free

There are three types of possible bodies in the cinema. There is the subject body onscreen, there is the camera as an imaginary body- a conduit body made up mainly of eyes choosing what we will see, and there is us, the audience bodies that do the watching through a system of involuntary physiological processes and cognitive responses that make up human perception.

 

To celebrate the closing of SECTOR 2337’s inaugural exhibition The New [New] CorpseChristy LeMaster of The Nightingale curates a program of the same name and inquiry featuring six moving image works that frustrate our usual experience of bodies onscreen. These works subvert the traditional mode of watching bodies in narrative action, or as objects of sexual desire, or as merely characters. Rather these works use body as conceptual site, performative metaphor, or abstracted modular component.

Program Details: 
THE NEW NEW CORPSE: (1971-2014, various formats, TRT 59 min)
>> BOUNCING IN THE CORNER #36DDD by Dara Greenwald (1999, USA, video, 3 min)
>> BABY ! LOVE YOUR BODY ! EPISODE 1 (ENGLISH) by Poussy Draama & Fannie Sosa (2014, France, HD video, 7 min)
>> AFFECTION by Blair Bogin and Danya Gross (2014, USA,HD video, 1 min)
>> CUT by Matthias Müller and Christoph Girardet (2013, Germany, digital, 13 min)
>> DEEP SLEEP by Basma Alsharif (2014, Malta/Greece/France/Palestine. HD video, 13 min)
>> NINE GATES by Paweł Wojtasik (2012, United States,  12 min)

>> TWO FACES by Hermine Freed (1972, United States, 6 min)

Special Thanks to VIDEO DATA BANK for their support in presenting this program.

The Dead Weight Performance Series

featuring Jesse Malmed, Carlos Martiel, Jefferson Pinder, & Amelia Charter

December 18, 2014 @ 7:30pm | Amelia Charter & Jefferson Pinder  | Doors open @ 7pm

CHICAGO, 2014 — The Dead Weight Performance Series will present two evenings of performance by four invited artists, bookending the inaugural exhibition group show The New [New] Corpse, at Sector 2337. The exhibition regards a return to the figure. This trend echoes the earlier “crisis of the figure” theme in representational painting, while also resonating with newer questions of posthumanism, capitalist critiques, and the transformation of hierarchies, precipitating a “return” of a figure that seems distorted, grotesque, modified, or emphatically absent.The performance series, in conversation with the exhibit, considers the human as a non-human event. Philosopher Isabelle Stengers defines humans as “those whose souls are moved by the erotic power of Ideas. What makes us human is not ours: it is the relation we are able to entertain with something that is not our creation.” An Idea, writes Stengers, causes us to “think, feel, and hesitate.” The word cause does not imply a simple formula of cause and effect. Rather the nonhuman element (Idea), accessed by way of a practice, engenders the thinking, feeling, and hesitation that define us as human to and for ourselves. In the sense that these nonhuman elements can be said to, as apprehensions, inhere “inside” the human body, we propose the theme of the human as nonhuman event. Conversely, the body, like an anti-Idea, at times becomes as a physical encumbrance, what Emerson called the giant I always take with me. Performance, like the body in this formulation, may carry a similar weight of responsibility, often seeming to be more trouble than it’s worth – maximal effort for minimal returns – but inescapable. The law of the body is the law, like the law of gravity. If the human can be considered a nonhuman event, is the weight of performance living or dead? Does it oscillate between the poles of animate and inanimate? How will these four artists reveal that oscillation as apparent, visible, necessary, and performable?

DECEMBER ARTISTS

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Amelia Charter is a performance artist, teacher, and writer. Her interdisciplinary practice cultivates a bridge suspended between human presence, matter, and site. Her performances arrive out of embodiment investigations, body-mind practices, improvisation, sculptural configurations, and experimental writing. Her garments, furniture and installations hybridize functional and poetic qualities, bringing multiple meanings to everyday objects through sonic and tactile play. Her work often concerns motherliness, disobedience, dwelling, and the utilitarian. Charter regularly performs one-on-one, and both her solo and collaborative work has been featured at Defibrillator Gallery, Mana Contemporary, Co-Prosperity Sphere, with Second-Floor Rear, and at the Bits and Pieces monthly Salon in Chicago, and in artist-run organizations and larger curations in New York, Philadelphia, Denver and internationally in India. She earned her BA in Performance and Directing, was co-founder of Denver Performance Research, and received an MFA and fellowship in Performance from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Charter is currently working with artists KJ Holmes, Precious Jennings, and Elizabeth Watt, and is a sponsored artist this fall at Links Hall. She also offers private creative restorative sessions, and for over four years has coordinated a movement improvisation laboratory.

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Jefferson Pinder, a Chicago based video/performance artist, seeks to find identity through the most dynamic circumstances. His experimental videos and films feature minimal performances that reference music videos and physical theatre. Pinder’s work provides personal and social commentary in accessible and familiar format. Inspired by soundtracks, he utilizes hypnotic popular music and surreal performances to underscore themes dealing with Afro-Futurism, physical endurance and blackness.

His work has been featured in numerous group and solo shows including exhibitions at The Studio Museum in Harlem, the Wadsworth Athenaeum Museum of Art in Hartford, Connecticut, Showroom Mama in Rotterdam, Netherlands, The High Museum in Atlanta and the Zacheta National Gallery in Warsaw, Poland. Pinder’s work was featured at the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery exhibition Recognize. In the spring of 2012 his action packed endurance performance Ben-Hur was featured at the Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, DC. Most recently he’s been grappling with segregation and music in Alabama with a large ensemble performance titled Belly of the Beast in downtown Birmingham, a commission sponsored by The
Birmingham Museum of Art.

Jefferson received his BA in Theatre from the University of Maryland, and studied at the Asolo Theatre Conservatory in Sarasota, FL. In 2001, Jefferson returned to the University of Maryland to receive his MFA in Mixed Media. Currently he is an Associate Professor in the Contemporary Practices department at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

OCTOBER ARTISTS

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Jesse Malmed is an artist and curator working in video, performance, text, occasional objects and their gaps and overlaps. His various pre-occupations include: Choir Conductor, Loveable Slouch, Paranoiac Research Assistant, Comic Concierge, Junk Shop Salesman, Re-Titler, Poet-Comedian, Traffic Caller, Bootlegger, Idiot’s Idiot, Infinite Gesticulator, Pro Bono Closed Captioner and Imaginary Television Host. He has performed, screened and exhibited at museums, microcinemas, film festivals, galleries, bars and barns, including the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, Museum of Contemporary Photography, the Portland Art Museum’s Northwest Film Center, Light Industry, the Shanghai Biennial, Crossroads, Milwaukee Underground Film Festival and Chicago Underground Film Festival. In addition to his own work, Jesse programs at the Nightingale Cinema, co-directs the mobile exhibition space and artist bumper sticker project Trunk Show and has programmed work in a wide variety of contexts individually, as a member of Cinema Project and as the peripatetic Deep Leap Microcinema. His writing has appeared in Incite Journal, YA5, OMNI Reboot, Big Big Wednesday, Temporary Art Review, Bad at Sports and Cine-File. A native of Santa Fe, Jesse earned his BA at Bard College and his MFA at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He was named a “2014 Breakout Artist” by Newcity and is a 2014-15 Artistic Associate at Links Hall.

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Carlos Martiel (born in Havana) is a controversial Cuban artist specializing in performance. His works focus on specific political events and on social injustices that occurr inside and outside his country of origin. Martiel’s performances reflect on the relations of power between the individual and the different contexts in which he or she operates. He graduated from the National Academy of Fine Arts “San Alejandro,” Havana in 2009. Between the years of 2008-2010, he studied in the Catedra de Arte Conducta, directed by the artist Tania Bruguera. Martiel’s works have been included in: Havana Biennial (2009), Pontevedra Biennal (2010), Liverpool Biennial ( 2010), Biennial “La Otra,” Bogotá ( 2013); International Performance Art Biennale, Houston,(2014). He has had solo exhibitions at the Contemporary Art Center “Wifredo Lam,” Havana (2012); Nitsch Museum, Naples (2013); Axeneo 7, Montreal (2013); Lux Gallery, Guatemala City (2013); and Steve Turner Contemporary, Los Angeles (2014). He has received several awards, including “CIFOS Grants & Commissions Program Award” in Miami, 2014; “Arte Laguna” in Venice, Italy, 2013; “Close Up Award” in Vallarta, Mexico, 2012. His work has been exhibited in Estonian Museum of Art and Design in Tallinn, Estonia; Museum of Modern Art of Buenos Aires in Argentina; Bellevue Museum of Arts, Washington; The 8th floor in New York, Arocena Museum in Mexico, among others.

PRODUCERS

Every house has a door was formed in 2008 by Lin Hixson, director, and Matthew Goulish, dramaturge, to convene project-specific teams of specialists, including emerging as well as internationally recognized artists. Drawn to historically or critically neglected subjects, Every house creates performances in which the subject remains largely absented from the finished work. The performances distill and separate presentational elements into distinct modes – recitation, installation, movement, music – to grant each its own space and time, and inviting the viewer to assemble the parts in duration, after the fact of the performance, to rediscover the missing subject. Works include Let us think of these things always. Let us speak of them never. (2009) in response to the work of Yugoslavian filmmaker Dušan Makavejev, Testimonium (2013) a collaboration with the band Joan of Arc in response to Charles Reznikoff’s Testimony poems, and the on-going project 9 Beginnings based on local performance archives. In 2014, Hixson and Goulish shared a Foundation for Contemporary Arts fellowship in recognition of their work with Every house, and expanded their mission to
include curation.

Founded in 2005, The Green Lantern Press is an artist-run, non-profit press focused on emerging or forgotten texts in order to bridge contemporary experience with historical form. Head quartered at Sector 2337, the press produces contemporary art exhibitions and unique print publications that are noncommercial in nature. We celebrate the integration of artistic mediums. We celebrate the amateur, the idealist and those who recognize the importance of small independent practice. In a cultural climate where the humanities must often defend themselves, we provide intimate examples of creative thought.

Aeschylus' Seven Against Thebes

On December 13th, at 7:00 pm, Ecstatic Ritual Theater presents Aeschylus’ Seven Against Thebes, a reading for four voices of a new translation by John Tipton. This event is free.

Ecstatic Ritual Theater presents Aeschylus’ Seven Against Thebes : a reading for four voices of a new translation by John Tipton : directed by Devin King

Situated between the events of Oedipus the King and Antigone, Eteocles prepares to face his brother Polyneices in the encounter that will destroy them both. The play unfolds a complex lattice of opposing signs–brother/enemy, son/father, male/female, reason/rage, freedom/fate, life/oblivion–in one of the most striking spectacles in all of Greek tragedy.

John Tipton has two books, a translation of Sophocles’ Ajax and surfaces, a collection of his own verse, both published by Flood Editions. A translation of Aeschylus’ Seven Against Thebes and a new collection, Paramnesia, are forthcoming from Flood. He is the publisher of Verge Books and lives in Chicago with his wife Stephanie and son Levi.

Laura Goldstein’s first collection of poetry, loaded arc, was released by Trembling Pillow Press in 2013 and her second collection, awesome camera was published by Make Now Press in 2014. She has also published six chapbooks as well as numerous poems and essays in magazines in print and online. She currently teaches at Loyola University and co-curates the Red Rover Reading Series.

Patrick Morrissey is the author of the poetry collection The Differences (Pressed Wafer) and the chapbook Transparency (Cannibal Books).  His poems have appeared in New American Writing, Harp & Altar, The Cultural Society, and other journals.  He lives in Chicago and is the poetry editor of Chicago Review.

Suzanne Scanlon is the author of Promising Young Women (Dorothy, 2012), and the forthcoming Her 37th Year, An Index (Noemi Press, 2015). New fiction has appeared in Spolia, Hobart and MAKE. She reviews theater for the Chicago Reader and Time Out and teaches writing at Columbia College and in the MFA program of Roosevelt University.

Devin King helps run Sector 2337 and The Green Lantern Press with his wife Caroline Picard. A long poem CLOPS is out from The Green Lantern Press, and a new chapbook These Necrotic Ethos Come the Plains is out from Holon Press.

Co-occupations

Cultural Reproducers Zine Launch + Readings from the Division of Labor Reading Room

December 10th:: Doors open at 7pm / Program begins at 7:30 / All Sector 2337 events are free

 

To further explore modes, instances, and insights parenthood has on an artists’ work, practice and career, Sector 2337 hosts a reading and curated bookshelf in tandem with Glass Curtain Gallery’s group exhibition, Division of Labor: Chicago Artist Parents, curated by Christa Donner and Thea Liberty Nichols. This robust event — with readings and artist presentations from seven significant Chicago creators — is additionally intended as a book launch for the Cultural Reproducers zine (Temporary Services/Half Letter Press, 2014), in a cumulative celebration for the complexity and richness of artistic parenting.

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Organized in conjunction with Columbia College’s group exhibition, Division of Labor, this reading explores personal reflections on the impact of parenthood on an artist’s creative practice and professional career. Readers will present works and reflections from personal experience that highlight the reciprocal and typically private relationship between family and professional life. During the month of December, Sector 2337 hosts a bookshelf co-curated by Nichols and Donner with readings linked to the intersection of creative practice and family life.

Readers include Cándida Alverez, Claire Ashley, Christa Donner, Lise Haller Baggesen, Thea Liberty Nichols, Keiler Roberts and Fred Sasaki. Cultural Reproducers, Donner’s ongoing creative platform for parents in the arts, engages reproduction on a whole new level with the release of the zine Cultural ReProducers: Propositions, Manifestos and Experiments, a risographed think-tank of text and images from 28 international artists published in glorious duotone by the collective Temporary Services. The Speers will finish the evening off with a musical performance. This event celebrates both the exhibition and the zine, offering visitors a chance to bring home bound copies of artistic parental skillsharing and utopian visions for the future.

141112_divisionoflaborDivision of Labor examines direct links between the aesthetics, materiality and meaning of an artists work in relation to parenthood. By and for artist parents, it also raises larger, universally applicable questions about what constitutes a sustainable artistic practice.

Cándida Alvarez was born and raised in Brooklyn, New York. Alvarez received a BA from Fordham University and an MFA from the Yale School of Art in Painting and Printmaking. She is an alumnus of the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture and was an artist-in-residence at the Studio Museum of Harlem, and PS1 Long  Island City, Queens. Her work has been shown in museums and galleries around the world and is represented in numerous public and private collections, including The Addison Gallery of American Art, The Whitney Museum of American Art, The Studio Museum in Harlem, and El Museo del Barrio. Reviews of her work have appeared in various publications, including Art in America, Art News, and The New    York Times. Alvarez has taught at the School of the Art Institute since 1998, where she is a tenured professor in the Painting and Drawing Department. Alvarez served as Interim Graduate Dean for years 2010-2012.

Claire Ashley received her MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago(Chicago, IL), and her BFA from Gray’s School of Art (Aberdeen, Scotland). Originally from Edinburgh, Scotland, Ashley is now Chicago based. Currently, she teaches at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in the Department of  Contemporary Practices, and the Department of Painting and Drawing. She is represented by Galleri Urbane Marfa + Dallas, TX, and ROR Contemporary, Miami, FL.

Christa Donner is an artist, writer and curator whose multimedia projects are exhibited internationally. She is a founding member of Cultural ReProducers, a creative platform supporting cultural workers who are also working it out as parents.

Lise Haller Baggesen left her native Denmark for the Netherlands in 1992, to study painting at the Academy of Art and Industrial Design in Enschede and the Rijksacademy in Amsterdam. In 2008, she relocated with her family to Chicago, where she graduated from the School of the Art Institute in 2013 with an MA in Visual and Critical Studies. Over time, her painting practice evolved into a hybrid production, including teaching, curating, writing, and multimedia installation work. She has shown internationally in galleries and museums including Overgaden in Copenhagen, the Municipial Museum in the Hague, MoMu in Antwerp, Württembergischem Kunstverein in Stuttgart, CAEC in Xiamen, The Poor Farm in Manawa, Wisconsin, 6018 North, Chicago and the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago. MOTHERNISM (Green Lantern Press, 2014) is her first book.

Colin Palombi is a teaching artist and initiator of projects. He enjoys working collaboratively though video, animation, and printmaking. He maintains a blog of his work at colinpalombi.com ­

Thea Liberty Nichols is a curator, writer, and arts administrator from Chicago.

Keiler Roberts teaches at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and DePaul University. Her autobiographical comic, Powdered Milk has received three Ignatz nominations and was included in The Best American Comics 2014 Notables List. Her work has been published in The Chicago Reader, Mutha  Magazine and Newcity. She was special guest at Chicago Zine Fest 2013, a panelist at CAKE 2011, and performed at Brainframe.

Fred Sasaki is art director for Poetry magazine and a gallery curator for the Poetry Foundation. He also co-founded Homeroom Chicago’s “101” lecture series in which artists and professionals explore pop and subculture in front of a drinking crowd. With his son and late father he is the author of the zine series, FRED SASAKI’S & FREDSASAKI’S FOUR-PAGER GUIDE TO: HOW TO FIX YOU, a series of instructional pamphlets featuring the art and wisdom from three generations of family. Titles include “How to Stretch,” “How to Make Friends,” and “Prelude to Healthy Sex.”

The Speers are a husband/wife experimental music duo, currently based out of Chicago.  The group began as a guitar/bass feedback project, creating spontaneous compositions of shifting timbres and overwhelming volume.  More recently, the Speers (either solo, as a duo or in any of the many groups the perform in) have shifted their focus and primarily perform with their collections of library LPs and modular synthesizers, utilizing live sampling and signal processing to find the hypnotic patterns hidden in ordinary sounds. A recent performance can be heard here: https://soundcloud.com/peter_speer/the-speers-at-quimbys-mp3 The group has a CDr and a Cassette out on the Colonial Recordings USA label.

Patrick Morrissey & Hannah Brooks-Motl

On December 6th, @ 7pm, poets Patrick Morrissey and Hannah Brooks-Motl will read in celebration of Morrissey’s new book The Differences, out from Pressed Wafer. This event is free.

Patrick Morrissey

Patrick Morrissey is the author of the poetry collection The Differences (Pressed Wafer) and the chapbook Transparency (Cannibal Books).  His poems have appeared in New American Writing, Harp & Altar, The Cultural Society, and other journals.  He lives in Chicago and is the poetry editor of Chicago Review.

Hannah Brooks-Motl

Hannah Brooks-Motl is the author of the full-length poetry collection The New Years (Rescue Press) and the chapbook The Montaigne Result (Song Cave). Her poems and criticism have appeared in Best American Experimental Writing, Bookforum, Fence, and the Kenyon Review Online, among others. She currently lives in Chicago.

Trevor Perri and Nathan Hoks

Poetry and Theory #3: Brakhage and Circles

Our 3rd Poetry and Theory event pairs a philosopher exploring perception in the works of Stan Brakhage and a poet using circles to converse between inner and outer experience.

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Trevor Perri received a PhD in philosophy from the University of Leuven in Belgium in 2013. His research focuses on theories of habit and memory in nineteenth and twentieth century continental philosophy, and he currently teaches philosophy courses at Loyola University Chicago. Most recently, he has published “Image and Ontology in Merleau-Ponty” in Continental Philosophy Review and “Bergson’s Philosophy of Memory” in Philosophy Compass.

Sounding the Depths of the Visible: The Films of Stan Brakhage as Philosophy of Perception: In his early manifesto Metaphors on Vision the avant-garde filmmaker Stan Brakhage asserts that our perception is ordinarily limited and disfigured by language and learned laws of perspective. Although he does not think that we can simply undo this limitation and return to some original perception, Brakhage does suggest that it is possible to overcome this condition by developing our “optical mind” or “visual understanding.” And further, Brakhage suggests that it is possible to make visible what we have learned in “cinematic experiences.” Focusing on his early film Anticipation of Night (1958), Perri will consider what it is that Brakhage succeeds in showing in his films (which may be different than what he himself writes), and will also ask what a philosophy that aims to account for vision and perception might learn from Brakhage’s work.

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Nathan Hoks is the author of two books of poetry, Reveilles and The Narrow Circle, which was a winner of the 2012 National Poetry Series and published by Penguin. He is an editor and letterpress printer for the micro-press Convulsive Editions and currently works as a tutor at Truman College and as a lecturer at the University of Chicago.

Following Nonhuman Kinds: Final Meeting on December 2014

On December 3rd at 7:00pm, the Latitude reading group, Following Nonhuman Kinds, will meet for their final potluck discussion at Sector 2337, where co-organizers, Rebecca Beachy, Karsten Lund, Caroline Picard, and Andrew Yang will present their own work in relation to how humankind engages its nonhuman kin. An informal disucssion will thereafter open up, during which participants are invited to consider Jennifer Moxley’s There are Things We Live Among, & the final half of Reza Negarestani’s Cyclonpedia. This meeting is open to the public. Please RSVP to caroline@sector2337, indicating whether or not you’d like to bring some food for the group to share.

 

About the reading group: Everywhere we turn, we find a territory of nonhuman things. It is impossible to escape the material din of others – from material structures: plants, robots, animals and objects, to those all but invisible bodies outside the bounds of human perception: atoms, molecules, pollutions, viruses, satellites, planets et al. While humanity has historically identified itself as something categorically superior to all else, this reading group examines texts, theories, and works of art that challenge the theoretical terms with which we engage our landscape. Following Nonhuman Kinds pursues the complicated strangers among us, ignoring hierarchical conventions in order to reframe and reconsider the interstitial, interspecies web we inhabit. Organized by Caroline Picard, with texts co-curated by Rebecca Beachy, Karsten Lund, and Andrew Yang, the reading group will discuss the work of Jane Bennett, Ian Bogost, Isabelle Stegner, Reza Negarestani, Timothy Morton, Mel Y Chen, and others. Following Nonhuman Kinds: Ongoing Investigation is a direct continuation of a symposium of that same name that took place in Bourges, France in April of 2014.

About the organizers:

Born in Denver, Colorado, Rebecca Beachy is a recipient of both an MFA in Studio Arts and an MA in Art History from the University of Illinois at Chicago. In Chicago, her sculptures, interventions and installations have been exhibited at Iceberg Projects, 6018NORTH, the Southside Hub of Production, and Gallery 400, among other spaces. A recent artist in residence at the FRISE Künstlerhaus of Hamburg’s Altona, Rebecca has since been collaborating on a new Chicago residency for German artists through Chicago/Hamburg Sister Cities Exchange. Her written work has been published with literary journal Puerto del Sol and will be included in the Center for Humans & Nature’s upcoming City Creatures compilation (Univ. of Chicago Press, Spring 2014). In addition to teaching at ChiArts, she works as a volunteer specimen preparator and educator, where she demonstrates taxidermy to the public at the Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum for the Chicago Academy of Sciences, Department of Collections.

Karsten Lund has worked as a curator, writer, and artist since 2007, after completing an MA at the University of Chicago. He is currently a Curatorial Assistant at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, where he has organized multiple exhibitions, including the forthcoming Chicago Works: Sarah and Joseph Belknap, and assisted on a dozen others, including The Way of the Shovel: Art as Archaeology and This Will Have Been: Art, Love & Politics in the 1980s. Alongside his work at the MCA, Karsten pursues a wide array of independent projects, often as a means to explore experimental approaches, collaborative structures, or more open-ended propositions. Most recently, he guest curated Phantoms in the Dirt, for the Museum of Contemporary Photography at Columbia College Chicago (July 24-October 5). Past projects have been presented at the Hyde Park Art Center, Peregrine Program, and an immense factory shortly before its demolition, among other locations. As a writer and editor, Karsten has a strong interest in the essay as a creative form and he continues to explore new directions and alternative formats for exhibition catalogues and artist-driven publications.

Caroline Picard is an artist, writer and curator who explores the figure in relation to systems of power though on-going investigations of inter-species borders, how the human relates to its environment and what possibilities might emerge from upturning an anthropocentric world view. To further accent the porousness of borders and bounds, Picard’s projects manifest in a variety of cross-disciplinary mediums including curation, painting, video, administrative practices, interviews with artists, works of fiction, comics, and critical essays. She writes regularly for the Art21, Artslant, and Art ltd. Magazines, and was the 2014 Curatorial Fellow at La Box, ENSA in Bourges France for her project, Ghost Nature. This October she will be the Co-Director of Sector 2337, an experimental gallery and bookstore with Devin King. www.sector2337.com

Andrew Yang’s research practice explores a range of themes across the evolution & development of form and natural history. His work can be found in journals such as Biological Theory and Gastronomica, and exhibited in Germany, Japan, and throughout the US. He studied zoology and philosophy of science at Duke University (PhD) and visual arts and the Lesley University College of Art and Design (MFA). He is an Associate Professor at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago a Research Associate at the Field Museum of Natural History.

Narcissus

Monica Westin & John Tipton

Poetry and Theory #2: Philostratus and Paramnesia

Our second Poetry and Theory event pairs a discussion of early ekphrasis with a poet attending to paramnesia and translation. This event is free.

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Monica Westin is an arts writer and historian of rhetoric based in Oakland. Her dissertation explores the role of mental images in rhetorical theory from Aristotle through the Second Sophistic. A regular contributor to Artforum.com, Monica‘s criticism and essays on art and aesthetics have appeared in The Believer, BOMB, The Brooklyn Rail, along with other publications that don’t start with the letter B.

During the “Crisis of the Third Century AD” that marked the end of Classical Antiquity in Imperial Rome, the Greek sophist and writer Philostratus the Elder produced a long, strange book containing only descriptions of imaginary paintings. Westin’s talk will present Philostratus’ ekphrases both as artifacts of creativity during catastrophe and as evidence of an understudied shift in historical models of the imagination. Westin will first contextualize these ekphrases in their literary period of the “Second Sophistic” (1st-4th centuries AD), when writers identified with and attempted to return to the great rhetoric of Classical Greece, and yet were deeply engaged in the creation of new forms and genres, including the earliest Western fictional novels. She will give an account of how the role of description/ekphrasis shifted and grew from a simple rhetorical device and into a key element of these first Greek novels, where long descriptions, far from being digressive, provided the first systems for what we now think of as literary interpretation. Westin’s ultimate argument is that the novels’ use of description/ekphrasis to engage readers in searches for hidden meaning grew out of a conception of fictionality that the field of rhetoric, through Philostratus and other sophists, developed during this period. She will end by suggesting that Philostratus’ ekphrases also offer an alternative history of art criticism, one anchored not in art history but in the history of phantasia.

John Tipton has two books, a translation of Sophocles’ Ajax and surfaces, a collection of his own verse, both published by Flood Editions. A translation of Aeschylus’ Seven Against Thebes and a new collection, Paramnesia, are forthcoming from Flood. He is the publisher of Verge Books and lives in Chicago with his wife Stephanie and son Levi.

Sarah Fox, Justin Petropoulos, & Paul Martinez Pompa

On November 21st, @ 7pm, poets Sarah Fox, Justin Petropoulos, & Paul Martinez Pompa will read. This event is free.

Sarah Fox

Sarah Fox is the author of Because Why and The First Flag, both from Coffee House Press. She lives in Chicago.

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Justin Petropoulos is the author of two collections of poetry, Eminent Domain (Marsh Hawk Press 2011), selected by Anne Waldman for the 2010 Marsh Hawk Press Poetry Prize and <legend>   </legend> (Jaded Ibis Press 2013), a collaborative work with multimedia artist, Carla Gannis. His poems have appeared in American Letters & Commentary, Borderlands: Texas Poetry Review, Columbia Poetry Review, Crab Creek Review, Gulf Coast, Mandorla, Portland Review, and Spinning Jenny. Justin is a contributing editor for Entropy magazine and the program director of an after-school program for at-risk, elementary age children. He is also an adjunct faculty member at New Jersey City University, where he teaches composition and creative writing.

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Paul Martinez Pompa is the author of a book of poems. His work has also appeared in some journals and some anthologies. He lives far, far away from Logan Square.

Danger on Peaks

Joel Felix: Fool for Love

A talk testing the privileges of the lyric field in models of the beloved, the erotic, and the holy fool

On November 20th, @ 7pm, Joel Felix will give a talk titled Fool for Love: a talk testing the privileges of the lyric field in models of the beloved, the erotic, and the holy fool. This event is free.

Joel Felix was born and raised in the Downriver Detroit area. As an adult, he settled in Chicago where he co-edited LVNG magazine for ten years. He holds an MFA from Bard College and presently serves as an Associate Director of Curriculum in the University of Washington’s School of Public Health. He lives in the Lake City area of Seattle with Candice Rai and their son Sanchaman. Limbs of the Apple Tree Never Die is his first book of poetry.
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Mathias Svalina, Andrea Rexilius, Mairead Case, & Joel Craig

On November 15th, @ 7pm, poets Mathias Svalina, Andrea Rexilius, Mairead Case, & Joel Craig will read. This event is free.

Mathias Svalina is the author of four books, most recently Wastoid from Big Lucks Books. Civil Coping Mechanism will release The Depression, a collaboration with photographer Jon Pack, in the future. He is an editor for Octopus Books & lives in Denver, Colorado. 

Andrea Rexilius is the author of  New Organism (Letter Machine, 2014), Half of What They Carried Flew Away (Letter Machine, 2012), and To Be Human Is To Be A Conversation (Rescue Press, 2011).  She is an Assistant Professor of Writing & Poetics at Naropa University’s Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics, where she is also the Summer Writing Program Coordinator, co-coordinator of the What/Where Reading Series, and the co-founder and coordinator (with Michelle Naka Pierce) of the biennial conference [Dis]Embodied

After a decade working in Chicago at independent presses and public events, and with youth at the Poetry Foundation and Louder Than a Bomb, Mairead Case now lives in Colorado where she is a PhD student at the University of Denver, a columnist at Bookslut, and a project editor. Her first book, See You In the Morning, comes out from featherproof in October 2015.

Joel Craig is the author of The White House (Green Lantern Press, 2012), and the chapbook Shine Tomorrow (Lost Horse, 2009). He co-founded and curates The Danny’s Reading Series and edits poetry for MAKE Literary Magazine. He lives, in Chicago.

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Rodney Koeneke and Trisha Low

This event is sponsored by Kenning Editions with help from Poets & Writers. Admission is free and the venue is ADA accessible.

Rodney Koeneke’s Etruria is just out from Wave Books. Earlier collections include Musee Mechanique (BlazeVOX, 2006) and Rouge State (Pavement Saw, 2003). Recent work can be found in The Brooklyn Rail, Fence, Granta, Gulf Coast, The Nation, and at Harriet, where he was August’s Featured Writer. A longtime resident of the San Francisco Bay Area, he currently lives in Portland, Oregon, where he teaches British and World History.

Trisha Low is committed to wearing a shock collar because she has so many feelings. She is the author of The Compleat Purge (Kenning Editions, 2013). Remote controls are available at Gauss PDF, Against Expression: An Anthology of Conceptual Writing, Troll Thread and others. She lives in New York City.

 

Partial

Partial and Billie Howard

On Friday, November 7th, Billie Howard will be performing a solo score of Joseph Clayton Mills, and Partial will be improvising with objects.

Partial is the collaborative project of Noé Cuéllar and Joseph Clayton Mills. Their first full-length recording, LL, was released in 2014 by Another Timbre.

Noé Cuéllar is a sound composer working with focus on bellowed and pneumatic instruments and techniques for their internal preparations. Since 2009 he has poured his practice into a collaborative nexus that includes performance, installation, sculptures, and visual art with Joseph Kramer as Coppice.His work has been presented at a number of festivals, broadcasts, and venues including the Museum of Contemporary Art, Pritzker Pavilion, and Experimental Sound Studio in Chicago; and in Ireland, Iceland, and India, among others internationally.

Joseph Clayton Mills is a musician, artist, and writer who lives and works in Chicago. His text-based paintings, assemblages, and sound installations have been exhibited in Chicago, New York, and Europe and his work has appeared in numerous publications, including The New Yorker and the architectural journal Log. He is an active participant in the improvised and experimental music community in Chicago, where his collaborators have included Adam Sonderberg and Steven Hess (as Haptic), Michael Vallera (as Maar), Sylvain Chaveau, Jason Stein, Michael Pisaro, and Olivia Block, among many others. His recordings have appeared on numerous labels, including Another Timbre, Umor Rex, FSS, and Entr’acte. In 2013, in conjunction with Noé Cuéllar, he launched Suppedaneum, a label focused on releasing scores and their realizations.

Billie Howard is a Chicago-based pianist, violinist and educator. As an adjunct Professor of Piano at Concordia University, she is dedicated to sharing her pedagogical knowledge of music theory and technique as well as encouraging her students in their artistic and musical expression. As a performer, she is inspired by contemporary music on the farthest ends of the volume spectrum, ranging from the quietest sounds to fully-amplified extremes. She frequently works in collaboration, often with one of her groups: The Paver, NbN Trio, a.pe.ri.od.ic, Aptera Strings andGirl Group Chicago.

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Jane Jerardi: November Artist-in-Residence

with a looped screening of "Efficiency" (2005) in the Sector Project Space & an artist workshop on November 9th

November 07 – December 06, 2014

November 9, 2-3:30pm Artist Workshop

This event is affiliated with The New [New] Corpse

Jane Jerardi is a time-based artist working in the media of choreography, performance, and video. She has created work for a variety of contexts — from theaters and galleries to record store listening booths, public subway escalators, audio walks, and projected videos — constructing pieces that often move fluidly between media.

In addition to screening her film and organizing a workshop, while in residence Jane Jerardi will develop a new piece, with the working title Tenuous. Drawing on DeLillo’s Cosmopolis, an article about immortal jellyfish, and interviews with security guards, Jerardi’s new choreographed work explores strategies of control in every day life, and the sense of uncertainty.

“I don’t own a watch or clock. I think of time in other totalities now. I think of my personal time-span set against the vast numerations, the time of the earth, the stars, the incoherent light-years, the age of the universe, etc. World is supposed to mean something that’s self-contained. But nothing is self-contained. Everything enters something else. My small days spill into light-years.” -Don DeLillo, Cosmopolis

 

About Efficiency (2005) Video documentation from a performance work by Jane Jerardi. Efficiency originated from a Washington Post commentary that looked at our incessant desire for hyper-efficiency all in the quest for more free-time— tracing its roots to the industrial revolution and the way it permeates contemporary life. Despite more and more technological advancements and methods for speed — from smartphones to email, transportation to exercise regiments — increased efficiency never seems to quite live up to its promise of more ‘free’ time. Documentation from this work captures abstract choreography against a backdrop of fast-paced urban life in an exploration of the ordinary intimacies that crop up between strangers. It reflects on how our labors seem to disconnect us from ourselves and our relationships. Images of a swimming pool allude to some the fantasy and desire for inefficiency — removed from the office and everyday commutes. With an original score by UK experimenter Scanner (aka Robin Rimbaud) and video projections create in collaboration with Michael Wichita, the piece features Brian Buck, Jane Jerardi, and Nicholette Routhier. Efficiency was commissioned by Washington Performing Arts Society on the occasion of its 40th anniversary season, with support from the Eugene and Agnes E. Meyer Foundation. The creation of Efficiency was also funded in part by the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities, an agency supported in part by the National Endowment for the Arts.

Exercising Inefficiency : a workshop
Sunday Nov 9, from 2-3:30 pm

What if you already are everything you needed? You didn’t need to work harder, or faster, or more efficiently to ‘get ahead’? That in fact there was no getting ahead and instead you might slow down and become aware of your body to realize you are already here. You might ‘exercise inefficiency’ in a strident refusal — or subtle resistance — to everything telling you to be faster and more productive. Come practice inefficiency on Sunday Nov 9, from 2-3:30 pm. A mix of relaxation, breathing, meditation and movement exercises will aid us in traveling into body-time. Open to all – all ages, sizes, types, experience, people. While this event is free, space is limited, so please RSVP via facebook or send an email to caroline@sector2337.com

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Elizabeth Arnold & Eric Elshtain

On October 30th, the poets Elizabeth Arnold and Eric Elshtain will read @ 7pm. This event is free.

Elizabeth Arnold is the author of four books of poetry, including Life (Flood Editions, 2014). She is on the MFA faculty at the University of Maryland and lives in Hyattsville, Maryland.

On Effacement: “Elemental and unsparing, quiet and startling, Arnold’s supple syntax is a source of gravity and vertigo. It is an acute expression of a mind’s awareness of the tragedy of effacement: in burning through it, we gain a keener sense of our predicament.” John Palattella, The Nation

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Eric Elshtain, who holds a doctorate from the University of Chicago, is a homemaker and also the poet-in-residence, through the non-profit Snow City Arts, at John H. Stroger, Jr. and UIC Children’s Hospitals where he conducts poetry and art workshops with patients ranging in age from six to 21. He also teaches literature at the Better Boys Foundation in Chicago. Elshtain’s poetry, reviews, and interviews can be found in McSweeney’s, Skanky Possum, Notre Dame Review, Ploughshares, American Letters & Commentary, Interim, Salt Hill, GutCult, Denver Quarterly, Chicago Review, Fact-Simile, Kennesaw Review, and other print and on-line journals. The author of several chapbooks including The Cheaper the Crook, the Gaudier the Patter (Transparent Tiger Press, 2004) and Here in Premonition (RubbaDucky, 2006), Elshtain has a full-length book of poetry forthcoming in Spring 2014 from Verge Books. He is also the editor of Jon Trowbridge’s on-line Beard of Bees Press.

Kelly Christian and Laura Goldstein

Poetry and Theory #1: Corpse Photography and awesome cameras

Our first Poetry and Theory event pairs a historian of corpse photography and a reading from a serial poem focusing on the effect of a flourishing media in a culture comfortable at war. This event is free.

Kelly ChristianLaura Goldstein

Kelly Christian is a researcher, writer, and artist who explores cultural responses to death, and the history of postmortem and funerary photography. After photographing military funerals in Maine during the height of the Iraq War, Kelly realized that there was no turning back from the dark side. She is currently a member of The Order of the Good Death, and a staff writer for the online publication, Dilettante Army.

Christian will be engaging in a lecture exploring chronological shifts in the “labor of death”. She will speaking to how the corpse was traditionally handled prior to the professionalization/medicalization of death, and frame that in opposition to contemporary funerary practices. This will include specific examples of how the living navigated moving and posing the dead, as well as the cultural context which allowed for these practices to take place – medicine before germ theory and death as a daily reality.

Laura Goldstein’s first collection of poetry, loaded arc, was released by Trembling Pillow Press in 2013 and her second collection, awesome camera was published by Make Now Press in 2014. She has also published six chapbooks as well as numerous poems and essays in magazines in print and online. She currently teaches at Loyola University and co-curates the Red Rover Reading Series.

Goldstein’s awesome camera consists of multiple serial poems that focus in on the effect of a flourishing media in a culture comfortable at war. The poems comprise short durational experiments in seeing, reading, and performance.