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Thank you!

 Thanks to everyone for coming out to The Green Lantern Press fundraiser this last Saturday. It was a great evening, the success of which was due to the incredible convergence of goodwill from performers, food and drinks donated, donated goods and services, art works offered to the GLP’s live auction and artworks purchased, combined with the generous contributions of visitors and long distance subscribers, and the dedication of volunteers, board members, and staff. All of which is to say, Thank you for your support! With your help, the GLP’s 2016/2017 season promises to be a great second year at Sector 2337.

After Wednesday, Dec 16th, Sector 2337 will close for the holidays until February when it reopens for The Sea is Represented by an Irregular Shape,  a durational opera by Mark Booth in the main gallery, and Bleeding Black Noise, a group show in the project space curated by Amelia Ishmael.

Although the fundraiser has passed, you can still join our subscription program, buy a pair of pint glasses by Mark Booth, or  make a tax deductible donation before the end of the year here.

THANK  YOU!

Bang Bang Pie / Cowgirl Creamery / Marian Runk / Maverick Wine Group / Marz Community Brewing /Giovanni Aloi / Olivia Cronk / Tim Kinsella / Christy LeMaster / Jordan Martins / Ethan White /

Cellar Door Provisions / Fleur /  Marnie Galloway / The Hideout / JAM / Latitude / Lillstreet / Paper Monument / Michael Moody / Meg Onli / Rebuilding Exchange /

Candida Alvarez / Lise Haller Baggesen / Jeremy Bolen / Mark Booth / Robert Burnier / Alexandria Eregbu / Assaf Evron / Joseph Grigely / Adam Grossi / Carrie Gundersdorf / Kuras + MacKenzie / Esau McGhee / A. Laurie Palmer / Jefferson Pinder / Josh Rios + Anthony Romero / Bailey Romaine / Ellen Rothenberg / Daviel Shy / Deb Sokolow / Alexander Valentine / Philip von Zweck / Fo Wilson / Anne Wilson + Sally Alatalo /

Mayra Rodriguez Castro / Amelia Charter / Jane Jerardi / Devin King / Thea Liberty Nichols / Trevor Perri / Lara Schoorl / Stephen Williams /

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2015 Fundraiser Artist Profile: Jeremy Bolen

On February 26th, 2013 Caroline Picard conducted an interview with Jeremy Bolen, who kindly agreed to donate work to our 2015 auction. Here are some excerpts from “The Stage of Scientific Reproduction:”

CP: That sort of leads me to my next question—this idea of the photograph as a performance. I feel like you tend to you use photographic film as a membrane that records its own experience. You bury film underground, or use a lake as a camera—can you say more about that? And what does it mean to capture an image or trace of anti-matter?

JB: Yes, I love the idea of the photograph being a record of a performance, and in many instances [my pictures] function in that way. Diving into a lake to use that lake as a camera, digging holes to bury film to record radiation; there are modes of recording through performance and interference used in a lot of my work. The water shifts in Lake Geneva actually alter the shape of the LHC, so that performance of sorts is exactly what I am talking about here. Much of this work merges the trace of a performance with the document of a space or non-space.

I am drawn to working with photography as it can act as an extension of our human senses, and when that can be taken a step further, where it becomes an extension of perception, and a collaboration with the environment it is recording, there is a completeness that I really enjoy. And the film does act as a membrane of sorts, a malleable membrane that can record interactions with light, invisible phenomena and material simultaneously. Creating work in this way creates this really interesting play between planning and chance. Robert Smithson once said, “Planning and chance almost seem to be the same thing,” which is something I have been considering lately.

Jeremy Bolen. "CERN" 2013.

Jeremy Bolen. “41.70230º -87.91234º (buried at site a, with the first nuclear reactor) #7,” 2012. Archival pigment print with dirt from site, 20 x 25 in. Courtesy the artist.

CP: My last question is about authenticity. You also add material to your photographs—dirt from the site the image was taken, or you’ll wash a photo in a bath from Lake Geneva—how important is it that the material (the grass, the dirt, the water) be taken from its site of origin? And why?

JB: It is imperative that the material is taken from the site of origin. Absolutely. I want there to be an actual presence from the site: the smell, the entropy of the material, the way it interacts with the photographic image. I want there to be a first order experience, and a tension between the real and simulated, the actual and the representational. So I guess I do have some of my own rules.

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2015 Fundraiser Artist Profile: Ellen Rothenberg

On January 17th of 2011 I conducted an interview with Ellen. Here are a couple excerpts from, “How To Stretch an Arm Through a Gap.” Ellen Rothenberg has kindly agreed to donated work to our 2015 auction; she also had a solo exhibition at Sector last spring called elsetime, and participated in Field Static, an early Devin King/Caroline Picard curatorial endeavor at The Co-Prosperity Sphere in 2011.

While Ellen Rothenberg works in a range of scale and material, there is a tactile quality to her work–a directness that calls attention to the body. I always think of organic bodies, bodies that don’t recognize an essential authority in our human structures. Like a climbing vine or water, her work seems to stretch through and around expectations. There are cracks in the street where weeds grow. The roof boasts an almost mystical, wandering leak. Ellen investigates literal and psychological structures, delving into the tension between what we take for granted and what has been overlooked. She activates the porousness of an assumption, nestling into its marginalized areas in order to produce new, self-reflexive spaces.

Caroline Picard: I’m interested in how you choose the material you work with–whether that is text, fiber, performance, or installation?

Materials aren’t neutral — they carry meaning along with their histories of production and use. Perhaps this preoccupation with materials is a pre-digital sensibility?   I’m interested in the inflection of meaning that occurs through the materials’ specificity.  In Berlin this past summer, I exhibited Constellations, an installation which employed 5 and 10 cent store price tags from the 40s. At the gallery the price tags were arranged in loose clusters along with arrow signs indicating direction or possible locations. The work referenced economies – – an economy of scale, of transport (the work could be packed in a small suitcase and brought to Europe in an overhead rack) but most importantly, the work spoke to this moment of global economic crisis and the oblique and often indecipherable relationships between interwoven economic forces that shape our options on the most elemental level… the price of bread.  With their archaic prices: 7 cents, 11 cents, 29 cents, 12 for $1.79, the bright red tags with their worn surfaces and minute sums arranged in seeming infinite clusters spoke to me of the indecipherability of the global economic crisis.

I don’t think of performance or installation as a material, but a methodology or a form necessitated by the content of the work.

Ellen Rothenberg, "Constellations," Schalter, 2010, Berlin

Ellen Rothenberg, “Constellations,” Schalter, 2010, Berlin

CP: Do you feel like there are expectations for an “artist” in the world? How have you/do you negotiate/d those?

ER: Expectations are directed at artists from both outside and within the art world; the artists’ job is to address and challenge them. Some expectations are historically inflected — during college there was a common assumption that the “real” or “best” artists were men and  just working against this assumption was political. One of the most radical acts in my career was to have a child, because family doesn’t figure into most notions of who artists are and how they’re supposed to live.  With the relentless, myopic cultural focus on youth and the “new,” just continuing to work as an artist is an ongoing act of resistance.

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2015 Fundraiser Artist Profile: Cándida Alvarez

Looking back over the years it seems amazing to have interviewed so many of incredible artists about their work. Always, I’m reminded by the cultural wealth of this city. In this case, I had the chance to talk to Cándida Alvarez not only about her show at The Hyde Park Art Center, mambomountain, but a number of preceding projects as well. Alvaraz kindly agreed to donated work to our 2015 auction, and this interview provides a little context to Alvarez’s practice. What follows is an excerpt from an interview between Alvarez and myself,  “Mashed Up and Shredded into Space,” originally published on the Art21 blog in January 2014. (Check out an overview of our auction here)

Caroline Picard: Can you talk a little bit about how you think about a painting’s relationship to space? Partly, I ask because I read about your show, For Sol Lewitt, where the work seems to intervene marginalized space directly, whether by placing works in an upper corner, or by projection beams of light. (Is that accurate? I only saw photos.) Your show at Hyde Park Art Center is taking similar factors into consideration, even though it might be less apparent as the works are primarily large canvases hung on the wall.

Candida Alvarez: My paintings intervene within a space. They participate and bring into conversation what lies between, above, below, behind, and in front. It is the excitement of taking paintings out of the studio and leading them towards a conversation that can be totally unexpected.

At the Hyde Park Art Center, I created a study room. By adding color and suspending two overlapping portable walls, the dimensions and the mood of the room changed as it heightened a sense of intimacy, which juxtaposed against the larger viewing space, gives those paintings more breathing space.

On the outside wall of the front gallery, there is a monitor that locates me inside my studio space, as you hear me talking about my painting process. I wanted to create an alternative to a wall text in order to possibly grab the attention of the teenagers that roam this community space, who are mostly indifferent to what is on the walls.

Mambo Mountain is an imaginary place, as are these paintings. I grew up in the projects, I rode the elevators up to the 14th floor, and I loved to look out the windows. That is where my mountain started and it has spread to the mountains that my parents grew up on, and live on to this day in Puerto Rico.

“DaDaDahlia,” 2005-08. Acrylic on canvas. 6ft x 7ft. Courtesy of the artist and Hyde Park Art Center.

“DaDaDahlia,” 2005-08. Acrylic on canvas. 6ft x 7ft. Courtesy of the artist and Hyde Park Art Center.

Fall 2015 in Review

Since October, Sector 2337 has hosted over eighteen events produced by The Green Lantern Press and featuring the work of more than 60 poets, artists, and academics. The GLP’s nonprofit status ensures that all of those events are always free for the public, encouraging an intimate, open platform for cultural engagement. What follows is an overview of some of those programs. Help us continue this rigorous commitment to free independent culture! You can join us for our December 12th fundraiser, join our subscription program and preorder three incredible new titles due out in 2016, or simply make a tax deductible donation at the bottom of this page.

Sound Walk in Logan Square as part of the New Romantic Speculations workshop organized by Giovanni Aloy and Caroline Picard.

Sound Walk in Logan Square as part of the New Romantic Speculations workshop organized by Giovanni Aloi and Caroline Picard. Photo by Lara Schoorl.

 

Esau McGhee, "Blackitolism," installation organized with Terrain 2015.

Esau McGhee, “Blackitolism,” installation organized with Terrain 2015.

 

Alex Zak installing for Tertiary Dimensions, 2015.

Alex Zak installing for Tertiary Dimensions, 2015.

 

"Tertiary Dimentions," curated by Alexandria Eregbu at Sector 2337, 2015. Left to right: Betsy Odom, "Double Bull," 2015, leather, 6.5 x 12 x 2"; Rami George, "Untitled" (scene from still), 2014, archival pigment prints, 12.5 x 18.5"; Oli Rodriguez, "The Papi Project: Archival Image #2: Kitten Eating a Raw Chicken," 2013, archival pigment print, 29.5 x 23"; Aay PrestonMyint, "Peony Mirror (For Mark Aguhar)," 2012, color video installation, looped; Gordon Hall, "Set (X)," 2015, joint compound and pigment on wood, 17 1/4 x 17 1/4/ x 5 1/5." In front: Amina Ross, "Soft Interiors," 2014, acrylic latex paint, queen size pillows, dimensions variable. Photo by Claire Britt

“Tertiary Dimentions,” curated by Alexandria Eregbu at Sector 2337, 2015. Left to right: Betsy Odom, “Double Bull,” 2015, leather, 6.5 x 12 x 2″; Rami George, “Untitled” (scene from still), 2014, archival pigment prints, 12 1/5 x 18 1/5″; Oli Rodriguez, “The Papi Project: Archival Image #2: Kitten Eating a Raw Chicken,” 2013, archival pigment print, 29.  1/5x 23″; Aay PrestonMyint, “Peony Mirror (For Mark Aguhar),” 2012, color video installation, looped; Gordon Hall, “Set (X),” 2015, joint compound and pigment on wood, 17 1/4 x 17 1/4/ x 5 1/5.” In front: Amina Ross, “Soft Interiors,” 2014, acrylic latex paint, queen size pillows, dimensions variable. Photo by Claire Britt.

 

"Tertiary Dimensions," curated by Alexandria Eregbu at Sector 2337, 2015. Left to right: Matt Morris, Hysteria, 2015, ruched pink chiffon curtian, 77 x 117"; Rami George, Untitled (scene from a still), 2014, archival pigment prints, 12.5 x 18.5." Photo by Claire Britt

“Tertiary Dimensions,” curated by Alexandria Eregbu at Sector 2337, 2015. Left to right: Matt Morris, “Hysteria”, 2015, ruched pink chiffon curtain, 77 x 117″; Rami George, “Untitled” (scene from a still), 2014, archival pigment prints, 12 1/5  x 18 1/5.” Photo by Claire Britt.

 

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Alexandria Eregbu presents her Tertiary Dimensions screening, “Bending The Circuit.”

 

"I'm starting to understand that through a tree too one can embrace a person" Nathanaël

“I’m starting to understand that through a tree too one can embrace a person” — Nathanaël

 

"A dance of difference that resist giving over to the upper classes and their fantasy of it" Matt Morris

“A dance of difference that resist giving over to the upper classes and their fantasy of it” — Matt Morris at his book launch for The Perfect Kiss (QQ)**

 

Joan of Arc in Studio. The band Joan of Arc (TIm Kinsella, Bobby Burg, Theo Katsaounis, Melina Ausikaitis and Jeremy Boyle) used the gallery of Sector 2337 to record part of their new album.

Joan of Arc in Studio. The band Joan of Arc (TIm Kinsella, Bobby Burg, Theo Katsaounis, Melina Ausikaitis and Jeremy Boyle) used the gallery of Sector 2337 to record part of their new album.

 

"No matter the circumstance do not grant emergency powers to anyone" Joshua Clover

“No matter the circumstance do not grant emergency powers to anyone” — Joshua Clover

 

"My uterus lightbulb is driving the bus" Rachel Galvin

“My uterus lightbulb is driving the bus” — Rachel Galvin

 

"Tinkerbell she's mending all the pots & kettles / Isn't it a bit too big a task for a fairy? / Tinkerbell is hardly dressed, you know" Jenny Boully

“Tinkerbell she’s mending all the pots & kettles / Isn’t it a bit too big a task for a fairy? / Tinkerbell is hardly dressed, you know” — Jenny Boully (poster by Koen Slothouber & Sonnenzimmer)

 

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Katherine Behar, “High Hopes (Deux),” presented during “Impatient Flowers,” a performance event curated by Every house has a door, 2015. Performance still.Photo by: Soohyun Kim.

 

Katherine Behar, Performance Still, Impatient Flowers, 2015.

Katherine Behar,  “High Hopes (Deux)” presented as part of “Impatient Flowers,” an evening of performances curated by Every house has a door, 2015. Performance still. Photo by: Soohyun Kim

 

Joshua Kent, Performance Still, Impatient Flowers, 2015. Photo by:

Joshua Kent, presented as part of “Impatient Flowers,” an evening of performance curated by Every house has a door, 2015. Performance still. Photo by: Soohyun Kim.

 

Joshua Kent, Performance Still, Impatient Flowers, 2015. Photo by: Soohyun Kim

Joshua Kent, presented as part of “Impatient Flowers,” an evening of performance curated by Every house has a door, 2015. Photo by: Soohyun Kim

 

"It's as though I thought I could understand every side from the outside / even the blind side" Rebecca Wolff

“It’s as though I thought I could understand every side from the outside / even the blind side” — Rebecca Wolff

 

"You are in that era of high silliness / Trotsky on toast" Christian Schlegel

“You are in that era of high silliness / Trotsky on toast” — Christian Schlegel

 

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Installation preparations for “Imperceptibly and Slowly Opening” with Deanna Ledezma and Mayra Rodriguez Castro.

 

Linda Tegg installing for "Imperceptibly and Slowly Opening"

Installation preparations for  “Imperceptibly and Slowly Opening” with Linda Tegg.

 

“Imperceptibly and Slowly Opening,” Installation view, Sector 2337, Fall 2015. Photo by Clare Britt.

 

"Imperceptibly and Slowly Opening," Sector 2337, 2015 curated by Caroline Picard. Left to right: Sri Chowdhury, "Affected Painting," 2015, wood, linen, oil paint, concrete, plants, light gels, shadows, ceramics, dimensions variable; Katy Cowan, "Side Happens," 2015, sun-sensitive paint on cotton, grass stains, poplar frame, 35 3/4 x 21 3/4 x 2 1/2" (individually); Zoe Crosher, "LA Like: Escaped Exotics," 2015, bronze casts, dimensions variable. Photo by Clare Britt

“Imperceptibly and Slowly Opening,” Installation view, Sector 2337, Fall 2015. Photo by Clare Britt.

 

Looking at Lichen during Laurie Palmer's Lichen Walk, 2015

Looking at Lichen during Laurie Palmer’s Lichen Walk, organized as part of The Lichen Museum, an” Institution in Residence,” at Sector 2337 in 2015.

 

This walk is dedicated to Grace Lee Bogs" Laurie Palmer introduces Lichen Walk

“This walk is dedicated to Grace Lee Bogs” Laurie Palmer introduces Lichen Walk, organized as part of The Lichen Museum, an “Institution in Residence,” at Sector 2337 in  2015.

 

"While the garbage that his organs make / sublimes into profit" Rob Halpern

“While the garbage that his organs make / sublimes into profit” — Rob Halpern

 

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“Worlds are born out of oblivion” — Matvei Yankelevich

 

"Heaven has clouds and hell has mirrors" Julie Carr

“Heaven has clouds and hell has mirrors” — Julie Carr

 

On halloween we made a lawn inspired by "Imperceptibly and Slowly Opening." Photo: Linda Tegg.

On halloween we made a lawn inspired by “Imperceptibly and Slowly Opening.” Photo: Linda Tegg.

 

Kit Schluter

“The inanimate attitude is a curtain of addiction early morning the rest” — Kit Schluter,  ‘Translations of Forgetting.”

 

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“as the news that distracts from spectral sass” — Jen Scappettone,  “. . .(In Exion).”

 

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“For every pile there is a pit, for every pit, there is a pile,” Thom Donovan, The Hole.

 

“as if a larynx stretched out in a tomcat giggle could exude spiked perfumes” — Cassandra Troyan, Kill Manual

 

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“Imagery played a critical role in both establishing and resisting colonial identity” Patricia Goldsworthy-Bishop presents her talk, “Casablanca Retro,” organized by InterCcECT.

 

Mark Payne + Caroline Picard in conversation, Plant Symposium, 2015.

Mark Payne + Caroline Picard in conversation, Plant Symposium, 2015. Photo by Lara Schoorl.

 

Plant Symposium

Still from Chuck Cannon’s talk, “Tree sex: slowly, imperceptibly kinky,” Plant Symposium, 2015.

 

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“Botanical Photograms Workshop” led by Fereshteh Toosi, Plant Symposium, 2015.

 

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Attention Feeder workshop led by The Laboratory for Material Thinking, Plant Symposium, 2015.

 

Keston Sutherland

“I do not underestimate the infatuation with infinity that is reaching out…” Keston Sutherland

 

Chantal Neveu

“Lines of blood irrigate my extremities…I let out a trickle of sound. / I expire,” Chantal Neveu

 

Lansana

Adaptation of Quraysh Ali Lansana’s book of poems, The Walmart Republic, directed by Emily Hooper Lansana, Poets Theater Festival, co-produced by The Green Lantern Press + Kenning Editions w/ help from Poets and Writers.

 

Daniel Borzutzky

“El Gato Pussycat Proteja Your Gringo Cheese,” a neo-benshi piece by Daniel Borzutzky, Poets Theater Festival, co-produced by The Green Lantern Press + Kenning Editions w/ help from Poets and Writers.

 

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