Fall 2015 in Review

Since October, Sector 2337 has hosted over eighteen events produced by The Green Lantern Press and featuring the work of more than 60 poets, artists, and academics. The GLP’s nonprofit status ensures that all of those events are always free for the public, encouraging an intimate, open platform for cultural engagement. What follows is an overview of some of those programs. Help us continue this rigorous commitment to free independent culture! You can join us for our December 12th fundraiser, join our subscription program and preorder three incredible new titles due out in 2016, or simply make a tax deductible donation at the bottom of this page.

Sound Walk in Logan Square as part of the New Romantic Speculations workshop organized by Giovanni Aloy and Caroline Picard.

Sound Walk in Logan Square as part of the New Romantic Speculations workshop organized by Giovanni Aloi and Caroline Picard. Photo by Lara Schoorl.

 

Esau McGhee, "Blackitolism," installation organized with Terrain 2015.

Esau McGhee, “Blackitolism,” installation organized with Terrain 2015.

 

Alex Zak installing for Tertiary Dimensions, 2015.

Alex Zak installing for Tertiary Dimensions, 2015.

 

"Tertiary Dimentions," curated by Alexandria Eregbu at Sector 2337, 2015. Left to right: Betsy Odom, "Double Bull," 2015, leather, 6.5 x 12 x 2"; Rami George, "Untitled" (scene from still), 2014, archival pigment prints, 12.5 x 18.5"; Oli Rodriguez, "The Papi Project: Archival Image #2: Kitten Eating a Raw Chicken," 2013, archival pigment print, 29.5 x 23"; Aay PrestonMyint, "Peony Mirror (For Mark Aguhar)," 2012, color video installation, looped; Gordon Hall, "Set (X)," 2015, joint compound and pigment on wood, 17 1/4 x 17 1/4/ x 5 1/5." In front: Amina Ross, "Soft Interiors," 2014, acrylic latex paint, queen size pillows, dimensions variable. Photo by Claire Britt

“Tertiary Dimentions,” curated by Alexandria Eregbu at Sector 2337, 2015. Left to right: Betsy Odom, “Double Bull,” 2015, leather, 6.5 x 12 x 2″; Rami George, “Untitled” (scene from still), 2014, archival pigment prints, 12 1/5 x 18 1/5″; Oli Rodriguez, “The Papi Project: Archival Image #2: Kitten Eating a Raw Chicken,” 2013, archival pigment print, 29.  1/5x 23″; Aay PrestonMyint, “Peony Mirror (For Mark Aguhar),” 2012, color video installation, looped; Gordon Hall, “Set (X),” 2015, joint compound and pigment on wood, 17 1/4 x 17 1/4/ x 5 1/5.” In front: Amina Ross, “Soft Interiors,” 2014, acrylic latex paint, queen size pillows, dimensions variable. Photo by Claire Britt.

 

"Tertiary Dimensions," curated by Alexandria Eregbu at Sector 2337, 2015. Left to right: Matt Morris, Hysteria, 2015, ruched pink chiffon curtian, 77 x 117"; Rami George, Untitled (scene from a still), 2014, archival pigment prints, 12.5 x 18.5." Photo by Claire Britt

“Tertiary Dimensions,” curated by Alexandria Eregbu at Sector 2337, 2015. Left to right: Matt Morris, “Hysteria”, 2015, ruched pink chiffon curtain, 77 x 117″; Rami George, “Untitled” (scene from a still), 2014, archival pigment prints, 12 1/5  x 18 1/5.” Photo by Claire Britt.

 

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Alexandria Eregbu presents her Tertiary Dimensions screening, “Bending The Circuit.”

 

"I'm starting to understand that through a tree too one can embrace a person" Nathanaël

“I’m starting to understand that through a tree too one can embrace a person” — Nathanaël

 

"A dance of difference that resist giving over to the upper classes and their fantasy of it" Matt Morris

“A dance of difference that resist giving over to the upper classes and their fantasy of it” — Matt Morris at his book launch for The Perfect Kiss (QQ)**

 

Joan of Arc in Studio. The band Joan of Arc (TIm Kinsella, Bobby Burg, Theo Katsaounis, Melina Ausikaitis and Jeremy Boyle) used the gallery of Sector 2337 to record part of their new album.

Joan of Arc in Studio. The band Joan of Arc (TIm Kinsella, Bobby Burg, Theo Katsaounis, Melina Ausikaitis and Jeremy Boyle) used the gallery of Sector 2337 to record part of their new album.

 

"No matter the circumstance do not grant emergency powers to anyone" Joshua Clover

“No matter the circumstance do not grant emergency powers to anyone” — Joshua Clover

 

"My uterus lightbulb is driving the bus" Rachel Galvin

“My uterus lightbulb is driving the bus” — Rachel Galvin

 

"Tinkerbell she's mending all the pots & kettles / Isn't it a bit too big a task for a fairy? / Tinkerbell is hardly dressed, you know" Jenny Boully

“Tinkerbell she’s mending all the pots & kettles / Isn’t it a bit too big a task for a fairy? / Tinkerbell is hardly dressed, you know” — Jenny Boully (poster by Koen Slothouber & Sonnenzimmer)

 

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Katherine Behar, “High Hopes (Deux),” presented during “Impatient Flowers,” a performance event curated by Every house has a door, 2015. Performance still.Photo by: Soohyun Kim.

 

Katherine Behar, Performance Still, Impatient Flowers, 2015.

Katherine Behar,  “High Hopes (Deux)” presented as part of “Impatient Flowers,” an evening of performances curated by Every house has a door, 2015. Performance still. Photo by: Soohyun Kim

 

Joshua Kent, Performance Still, Impatient Flowers, 2015. Photo by:

Joshua Kent, presented as part of “Impatient Flowers,” an evening of performance curated by Every house has a door, 2015. Performance still. Photo by: Soohyun Kim.

 

Joshua Kent, Performance Still, Impatient Flowers, 2015. Photo by: Soohyun Kim

Joshua Kent, presented as part of “Impatient Flowers,” an evening of performance curated by Every house has a door, 2015. Photo by: Soohyun Kim

 

"It's as though I thought I could understand every side from the outside / even the blind side" Rebecca Wolff

“It’s as though I thought I could understand every side from the outside / even the blind side” — Rebecca Wolff

 

"You are in that era of high silliness / Trotsky on toast" Christian Schlegel

“You are in that era of high silliness / Trotsky on toast” — Christian Schlegel

 

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Installation preparations for “Imperceptibly and Slowly Opening” with Deanna Ledezma and Mayra Rodriguez Castro.

 

Linda Tegg installing for "Imperceptibly and Slowly Opening"

Installation preparations for  “Imperceptibly and Slowly Opening” with Linda Tegg.

 

“Imperceptibly and Slowly Opening,” Installation view, Sector 2337, Fall 2015. Photo by Clare Britt.

 

"Imperceptibly and Slowly Opening," Sector 2337, 2015 curated by Caroline Picard. Left to right: Sri Chowdhury, "Affected Painting," 2015, wood, linen, oil paint, concrete, plants, light gels, shadows, ceramics, dimensions variable; Katy Cowan, "Side Happens," 2015, sun-sensitive paint on cotton, grass stains, poplar frame, 35 3/4 x 21 3/4 x 2 1/2" (individually); Zoe Crosher, "LA Like: Escaped Exotics," 2015, bronze casts, dimensions variable. Photo by Clare Britt

“Imperceptibly and Slowly Opening,” Installation view, Sector 2337, Fall 2015. Photo by Clare Britt.

 

Looking at Lichen during Laurie Palmer's Lichen Walk, 2015

Looking at Lichen during Laurie Palmer’s Lichen Walk, organized as part of The Lichen Museum, an” Institution in Residence,” at Sector 2337 in 2015.

 

This walk is dedicated to Grace Lee Bogs" Laurie Palmer introduces Lichen Walk

“This walk is dedicated to Grace Lee Bogs” Laurie Palmer introduces Lichen Walk, organized as part of The Lichen Museum, an “Institution in Residence,” at Sector 2337 in  2015.

 

"While the garbage that his organs make / sublimes into profit" Rob Halpern

“While the garbage that his organs make / sublimes into profit” — Rob Halpern

 

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“Worlds are born out of oblivion” — Matvei Yankelevich

 

"Heaven has clouds and hell has mirrors" Julie Carr

“Heaven has clouds and hell has mirrors” — Julie Carr

 

On halloween we made a lawn inspired by "Imperceptibly and Slowly Opening." Photo: Linda Tegg.

On halloween we made a lawn inspired by “Imperceptibly and Slowly Opening.” Photo: Linda Tegg.

 

Kit Schluter

“The inanimate attitude is a curtain of addiction early morning the rest” — Kit Schluter,  ‘Translations of Forgetting.”

 

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“as the news that distracts from spectral sass” — Jen Scappettone,  “. . .(In Exion).”

 

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“For every pile there is a pit, for every pit, there is a pile,” Thom Donovan, The Hole.

 

“as if a larynx stretched out in a tomcat giggle could exude spiked perfumes” — Cassandra Troyan, Kill Manual

 

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“Imagery played a critical role in both establishing and resisting colonial identity” Patricia Goldsworthy-Bishop presents her talk, “Casablanca Retro,” organized by InterCcECT.

 

Mark Payne + Caroline Picard in conversation, Plant Symposium, 2015.

Mark Payne + Caroline Picard in conversation, Plant Symposium, 2015. Photo by Lara Schoorl.

 

Plant Symposium

Still from Chuck Cannon’s talk, “Tree sex: slowly, imperceptibly kinky,” Plant Symposium, 2015.

 

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“Botanical Photograms Workshop” led by Fereshteh Toosi, Plant Symposium, 2015.

 

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Attention Feeder workshop led by The Laboratory for Material Thinking, Plant Symposium, 2015.

 

Keston Sutherland

“I do not underestimate the infatuation with infinity that is reaching out…” Keston Sutherland

 

Chantal Neveu

“Lines of blood irrigate my extremities…I let out a trickle of sound. / I expire,” Chantal Neveu

 

Lansana

Adaptation of Quraysh Ali Lansana’s book of poems, The Walmart Republic, directed by Emily Hooper Lansana, Poets Theater Festival, co-produced by The Green Lantern Press + Kenning Editions w/ help from Poets and Writers.

 

Daniel Borzutzky

“El Gato Pussycat Proteja Your Gringo Cheese,” a neo-benshi piece by Daniel Borzutzky, Poets Theater Festival, co-produced by The Green Lantern Press + Kenning Editions w/ help from Poets and Writers.

 

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2015 Green Lantern Press Art Auction

The following works have been donated by artists to raise money for The Green Lantern Press. Email caroline@sector2337.com with your bids (or follow the links below to purchase artworks outright). Around 9:00pm on Dec 12, at Sector 2337 (2337 N Milwaukee Ave., Chicago IL 60647), Giovanni Aloi will begin a live auction with these same items during the First Annual GLP Fundraiser at Sector 2337. In keeping with the artist-centric model of The Green Lantern Press, 20% of all money raised from art sales go back to the artists. The remaining 80% of the proceeds from this auction will help fund three exhibitions, three books, and more in 2016. Thank you for your support! You can buy tickets to our fundraiser here: $30 for entry / $65 for entry + cup by Mark Booth + all-you-can-drink.

Assaf Evron, "Untitled (Athens and Oraibi)," 2015, pigment print, 15 x 20". $600.00 – $2000.00 email caroline@sector2337.com with your starting bid! Assaf Evron, "Untitled (Athens and Oraibi)," 2015, pigment print, 15 x 20" Starting Bid: $600 Value: $2000 (edition 2/3) Image: courtesy of the artist and Andrea Meislin Gallery, New York City

(Above) Assaf Evron, “Untitled (Athens and Oraibi),” 2015, pigment print, 15 x 20″. | Starting Bid: $600 | Value: $2000 (edition 2/3) | more details here | Image: courtesy of the artist and Andrea Meislin Gallery, New York City

Alexandria Eregbu,

Alexandria Eregbu, “Proverbs for an Unwanted Passenger,” 2015. Engraved aluminum baton, 12 in. x 1.75 in. x 1.75 in. (Edition of 6). | Starting bid: $25 | Value: $250. | more details here

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Bailey Romaine, "Building sketch #2," 2015. Linoleum flooring, house paint, wood, nails, glue. Starting Bid: $75 | Value: $300 (edition 2/3) | Visit Square for more details about this work

(Above two) Bailey Romaine, “Building sketch #2,” 2015. Linoleum flooring, house paint, wood, nails, glue. | Starting Bid: $75 | Value: $300 (edition 2/3) | more details here

Robert Burnier, "Lektrinkis," 2013, primer on aluminium, 15 x 18". Starting Bid: $750.00 | Value: $2800.00 | Visit our square site for more details.

(Above) Robert Burnier, “Lektrinkis,” 2013, primer on aluminium, 15 x 18″. | Starting Bid: $750.00 | Value: $2800.00 | more details here.

Joseph Grigely

(Above two) Joseph Grigely, “Nine Blue Conversation,” 2001. Offset Litho & pins, edition 31/100 (comes with a signed certificate). Pub. Nadine Grady, Prague, 15 x 16.5” unframed. File no. JG.01/5/31 | Starting bid: $100 | Value: $500 | more details here

Jefferson Pinder

Jefferson Pinder, “Afro-Cosmonaut/Alien (White Noise),” Still from Video, 2008. Mounted photographic print (unframed). | Starting Bid: $250 | Value: $2,500 | more details here

Mark Booth

Mark Booth, “A Substance Heated to Fluidity is Represented by a Scented Cleanser or Cleaning Fluid,” 2014. 19 x 25” (framed), gouache, acrylic, and ink on paper. | Starting Bid: $150 | Estimated Value: $1,600 | more details here

Mark Booth

Mark Booth, “A Misaligned Eye is Represented by a Row of Unidentifiable Weeds,” 2014. 19 x 25” (framed), gouache, acrylic, spray paint, and ink on paper. | Value: $1,600 | Starting Bid: $150.00 | more details here

Deb Sokolow Info: Study for Frank Lloyd Wright’s Sadistic Streak, 2015, Graphite, colored pencil, crayon, collage on paper, 8 1/8 x 6″. | Second Bid: $250 | Value: $800 | more details here

Anne Wilson + Sally Alatalo, "Imperfect Sutures"

Anne Wilson + Sally Alatalo, ” Imperfect Sutures,” 1995, artist-made book, (Now out of print). | Starting Bid: $15/ea | Value: $30 | two copies of this book are available here (A) and here (B))

Jefferson Pinder, "The Missionary Project," 2009. Wood block print, no. 7 in an edition of 25. | Starting Bid: $75 | Value: $600 | more details

Jefferson Pinder, “The Missionary Project,” 2009. Wood block print, no. 7 in an edition of 25. | Starting Bid: $75 | Value: $600 | more details

Magalie Guérin, "Punctuation and Screen 3," 2014, ink and acrylic on paper, 14x17”, (framed). Starting Bid: $250 |Value: $800 (more details here)

Magalie Guérin, “Punctuation and Screen 3,” 2014, ink and acrylic on paper, 14×17”, (framed). | Starting Bid: $250 | Value: $800 | more details here

2015_Fundraiser_EsauMghee

Esau McGhee, “Madonna and Child,” (2015). Collage of found paper, screen print, acrylic and staples. | Starting Bid: $75 | Value: $250 | more details here

Ellen Rothenberg, 2014.

Ellen Rothenberg, ” Vienna/Kobani 5,” 2015. Photo: archival print, 14.5 x 22.25”, Edition: Artist Proof. | Starting Bid: $500 | Value: $1,500 | more details here

Jeremy Bolen, “Site A Excavation #7,” September 2013, Archival Pigment Prints created from buried film. dirt from site. 13”x16” | Starting Bid: $350 | Value: $2000.00 | more details here

Sonnenzimmer, “Sun Ra Arkestra,” Sonnenzimmer (Nick Butcher & Nadine Nakanishi), 2015. 6-color screen print, 16.5 x 23.4”, Edition of 340, signed and numbered. | Starting Bid: $10 | Value: $ 40 | more details here

Alexander Valentine, "Magnets Coil"

Alexander Valentine, “Magnet’s Coil,” 2014, collage, 22 x 16″ (framed) | Starting Bid: $100 | Value: $750 | more details here

A. Laurie Palmer, “Two posters (The Lichen Museum),” 2014. Hand printed silkscreens. | Starting Bid: $40| Value: $200 | more details here

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Lise Haller Baggesen, “Mothernism Flag (MOM IS WHERE THE ART IS),” 2013. Resist and dye on polyester/flag pole + holder, 44 x 44 in (111.76 x 111.76 cm). | Starting bid: $200 | Value: $650 | more details here

Cándida Alvarez,

Candida Alvarez, “Untitled (after mom’s portrait),” 2013, pencil, marker on vellum. Drawing is 9 x 11”; frame size is: 12 1/4 x 15 ¼” |Starting Bid: $100 | Value: $1,500 | more details here

Kuras + MacKenzie, “Talented (Partner of George Michaels, Partner of Jack White, Partner of Paul Simon, Partner of George Passmore),” 2015. No. 2 in a variable edition of 10, hand colored crayon and ink on paper.| Starting Bid: $350 |Value: $1,000 | more details here

Rebecca Mir Grady

Rebecca Mir Grady, “Messier 1 / Crab Nebula,” 2012. Framed original drawing, ink on bristol board. | Starting Bid: $150 | Value: $400 | more details here

Jefferson Pinder, “Afro-Cosmonaut/Alien (White Noise),” Still from Video, 2008. Photographic print, (unframed) | Starting Bid: $75 | Value: $600 | more details

Carrie Gundersdorf, Nightsky and branches 2012. Found images/paper 10 x 12”

Carrie Gundersdorf, Nightsky and branches 2012. Found images/paper, 10 x 12” | Starting bid: $150 | Value: $800

Adam Grossi, “Little Vision,” 2013. Ultrachrome print on archival Hahnemuhle paper, #19 in an edition of 20, 2013. | Starting Bid: $50 | Value: $100 | more details here

Daviel Shy

Daviel Shy, “Sacrifice of a Caprid Sister (1 of 2),” 2012, wood, carriage bolts, brackets, fire. | Starting Bid: $75 |Value: $150 | more details here

Josh Rios & Anthony Romero

Josh Rios + Anthony Romero, “Flowers (cement cake),” 2015, cement and flowers | Starting Bid: $75 | Value: $500 | more details here

Two posters1

2015 Fundraiser Artist Profile: A. Laurie Palmer

As part of the count down to our Green Lantern Press Fundraiser on Dec 12th, we are posting interviews or articles relating to artists who have agreed to donate work for the occasion. A. Laurie Palmer donated a set of two lichen museum posters (above). An essay from her book, In The Aura of the Hole was also included in Ghost Nature (co-published by The Green Lantern Press & La Box in 2014), and installed her Lichen Museum at Sector 2337 this winter as an Institution in Residence.  On January 10, 2012 Caroline Picard conducted an interview on the Art 21 blog with Laurie. Here are some excerpts from “Ideas as Medium:

CP: You have such a multi-faceted artistic life — from writing critical art reviews, to extensive, ongoing collaborations (like Haha, for instance), to teaching at the Art Institute, and then of course your own, singular, sculptural work and book-writing. How do these different elements collude and conspire with one another?

LP: If you think of a self as a system, constituted through its connections, extending outward through those lines of connection and being fed by them, then all the things you mention (and more) create a practice that is less about constructing an (artistic) identity and more about using a body for what it can do—plugging it in, experimentally. I want to use my self, while I am here, for whatever it can do— but I am always, still, trying to learn how to do this.

Writing about other people’s work, teaching, and making my own work, including collaboratively, are all facets of the same thing. Culture is a collective project. I am moved and inspired by other people’s work and then I don’t have to make that work, because they have, but other work becomes necessary, partly in response, partly in collusion. I am in awe of my students and feel acutely the privilege of access to their creative processes. Teaching turns you inside out—this motion is exhilarating, and exhausting. Writing is portable (which has been useful over the last eight years as I negotiate a long-distance, long-term love) but it’s evaporatory. Making visual art leaves material traces, even if you unmake along the way, time becomes visible. But you have to have somewhere to put those things.

Your question taps into one of my current pressing questions, about will—what is it? Where does it reside in the body? Or is it external to the body? If I think of matter as “willful,” agentic, then how does that extend to the body I call my own? In other words, I want to collaborate on multiple levels, including with the demands of a self that wants the world to change and wants to be changed with it but a self that can’t be reduced to this willfulness, that has always something else coursing through it, exceeding knowing, and asking (too) for respect.

Laurie Palmer. "Helium," 2011. Photo-etching, 16" x 20."

Laurie Palmer. “Helium,” 2011. Photo-etching, 16″ x 20.”

CP: Is there some map you have, some idea, as to how we might save the world? 

Maybe the first step is including ourselves in it. The authors of The Coming Insurrection offer a great analysis of how we are able to ignore the environmental devastation that we have created and that we are living (in) by creating a word and a concept—“the environment”—that doesn’t include us, but is instead separate from us.

I understand “the world” as a moiling and fluxing potentiality that we have no way to fully comprehend or determine, even as there are threads and knots and vectors with inertia and direction that we can partly know, and partly predict, and perhaps learn to develop collaborative relationships with. The world is making itself always, and we are subsumed inside of that constant process. I see hope in shifting our approach from one of wanting to know and control everything to one of collaboration—giving it up to what we can’t know, including those unknowable parts of ourselves and of the social body, as well as mineral, bacterial, climactic and other systems (that we are not doing things to, but with). Which is not the same as giving up.

 

 

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2015 Fundraiser Artist Profile: Robert Burnier

Robert Burnier has kindly agreed to donated work to our 2015 auction.

In September of 2014 Caroline Picard conducted an interview with Robert. Here a couple excerpts from, “The Matter of Invisible Energy:”

Clearly Burnier is having a moment. It is exciting to witness. With a background in computer science and painting, his sculptural works interrogate material and philosophical concerns. In one ongoing series, he begins with a flat piece of aluminum, folding it methodically until further folds are no longer possible. The resulting elegantly crumpled objects are covered with a layer of matte paint, and thereafter appear like crumpled balls of thick paper; they evoke the residue of vibrant energies — sitting like cast aside experiments whose original purpose is not longer accessible. Burnier’s work reintroduces the process of thinking as a final object in and of itself.

CP: I’m reminded of a Levi Bryant quote you shared with me: “As always, the battles that swirl around epistemology are ultimately questions of ethics and politics. As Bacon noted, knowledge is power. And knowledge is not simply power in the sense that it allows us to control or master the world around us, but rather knowledge is also power in the sense that it determines who is authorized to speak, who is authorized to govern, and is the power to determine what place persons and other entities should, by right, occupy within the social order.”

RB: I look at that quote as being an accurate statement about the inevitable outcome of some epistemology, whatever the intent. Bryant’s The Democracy of Objects regards a so-called “flat ontology.” It gives me a sense of release to imagine a world of radically absent hierarchy being just the way it is. It’s clear that histories of race, gender and social status can be looked at through a lens like that. I’ve also written and said before that in art anything is fair game if it’s done thoughtfully enough. So I try to be inclusive in terms of approach. Critical theory and reflection have taught us a great deal. But sometimes it also feels like we were painted into a corner or exiled to an island of denials. Bryant et. al. make a concerted study of this. Not that denials aren’t part of a process to figure things out. But eventually, don’t you run out of islands to escape to?

20140915151348-Burnier_Aferon_Kvar_B_webRobert Burnier; Courtesy of the artist and Andrew Rafacz Gallery

CP: I imagine you thinking about islands in your studio while folding aluminum, or cutting the corners off a wooden box…

RB: When I’m actually working on things, this is all sort of in the background. One thing I’m looking for above all else is to just partake in the huge openness of things while not forgetting I’m among them and so are my ideas. I want to see and respond to a surprise and have that be recorded for someone else to see. It’s like seeing it matters more than knowing it. That is, something that’s not only a remix of culture but is an occurrence to be regarded.

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