Interviews with Bleeding Black Noise

Prior to Amelia Ishmael’s upcoming curatorial project at Sector, she interviewed a number of the contributing artists. We compiled those interviews below. Bleeding Black Noise opens this coming Friday from 6-9pm.
Gast Bouschet & Nadine Hilbert http://wavelengths.ameliaishmael.com/2011/11/22/an-interview-with-gast-bouschet-vibrations-of-light-and-sound-to-trigger-seismic-molecular-events-to-shake-the-wall-to-break-down-barriers/
 
Faith Coloccia   http://wavelengths.ameliaishmael.com/2012/08/07/an-interview-with-faith-coloccia-sympathetic-magic-visual-scores-archives-and-memory/
Niels Geybels http://wavelengths.ameliaishmael.com/2013/01/03/an-interview-with-niels-geybels-sequences-monoliths-and-beneath-the-earth/

Michaël Sellam   http://wavelengths.ameliaishmael.com/2013/04/18/an-interview-with-michael-sellam-black-metal-forever-radical-transformations-and-reptilian-squamate/

Aldo Tambellini 
http://wavelengths.ameliaishmael.com/2014/03/31/an-interview-with-aldo-tambellini-going-back-again-forward-suspended-in-space-circular-forms-broadcasting-signals-into-spirals/
and
http://wavelengths.ameliaishmael.com/2012/09/13/an-interview-with-aldo-tambellini-black-zero-avant-garde-jazz-and-the-cosmic-void/
Jon Cates http://wavelengths.ameliaishmael.com/2013/08/29/an-interview-with-jon-cates-water-noises-datastreams-memory-glitches-dirty-new-media-lake-swimming/
Stephen O’Malley http://wavelengths.ameliaishmael.com/2011/12/05/an-interview-with-stephen-omalley-of-descent-burning-witch-hyperion-ensemble-sunn-o-imagery-concept-and-sound/
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10 Years at Roots & Culture Part 1: ROOTS

with 40000, artledge, duchess, & Green Lantern

Feb 12 – Mar 05, 2016

Opening Reception on Fri, Feb 11 @ 6-9pm
1034 N Milwaukee Ave., Chicago IL 60622

“Roots & Culture is emphatically thrilled to announce ROOTS, the first of its 10th Anniversary exhibitions (the second, predictably titled show, CULTURE will open June 25th, stay tuned for more info). In the spirit of a sort of active nostalgia, I decided to look backwards to the scene that set the stage for Roots and invite four of my favorite, most influential spaces from the greater Wicker Park area of the mid-aughts to stage new projects at the gallery.  Though retired (or reconfigured), these four programs, 40000, artLedge, duchess, and Green Lantern, inspired energies of possibility, inclusivity, and hybridity that continue to reverberate in the halls of R&C today. Each space is mounting a new project within the exhibition. Tying the show together is a selection of works by artists who overlapped with programming at R&C including Mike Andrews, Amanda Browder, Howard Fonda, Brian McNearney, Heather Mekkelson, Jamisen Ogg, Carmen Price, Shannon Stratton, Alexander Stewart, and more.” — Eric May, Executive Director
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MOTHERNISM at The Contemporary Austin

GLP Author Lise Haller Baggesen goes to Texas

On View at the Gatehouse Gallery at the Betty & Edward Marcus Sculpture Park
at Laguna Gloria
&
Organized by Julia Hendrickson

Lise Haller Baggesen (Danish, born 1969 in Aarhus; lives and works in Chicago) opens her book Mothernism (Poor Farm Press/Green Lantern Press, 2014)—a potent, purple object edged in the crisp silver of a fresh Wrigley’s gum wrapper—with an account of a long drive on the German Autobahn, followed by an ode to Donna Summer’s sultry disco style and lyrics from David Bowie’s 1979 song “Fantastic Voyage.” 1979 was the International Year of the Child, the heyday of disco, and for Baggesen, the touchstone for her multifaceted project, situated (as she describes it) at “the intersection of feminism, science fiction, and disco.” At The Contemporary Austin, Baggesen presents Mothernism in a new, site-specific iteration, the artist’s first solo museum presentation of this project and her first exhibition in Texas.” — Julia Hendrickson, Registrar & Assistant Curator for Special Projects, The Contemporary Austin.

Mothernism is also included in a group show, The Let Down Reflex, opening at the Elisabeth Foundation (323 W. 39th St, 2nd floor, NYC) on January 30th and running until March 12, 2016.
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Heading East This Summer : Imperceptibly & Slowly Opening

VOX POPULI, Philadelphia (May 05-Jun 18, 2016)
&
REVERSE (July 08-July 30, 2016)
The Green Lantern Press is pleased to announce that two variations of its fall show about plants, Imperceptibly & Slowly Opening, are travelling to the East Coast this summer. From May 05-June 18, 2016 one iteration of the show will take place in Philadelphia at Vox Populi. From July 08-July 30th, a second iteration will occur in Chelsea, New York at REVERSE. An exhibition catalogue will be available for those iterations; details of participating artists and affiliated programming is forthcoming.

Responding to a new field of critical thought, Imperceptibly and Slowly Opening uses the group exhibition format to explore the strangeness of plants and algae, and how they trouble human structures. Vegetal life forms are banal in their ubiquity. Undeniably alive, yet silent, they creep upwards, their roots submerged and out of human sight. Like anarchists protesting order, weeds break through concrete. Plants challenge theoretical logic as well; they can be both one and many: Aspen trees growing on a hillside share a single root system. Plants have occupations and desires: engaged in constant growth, they spread out with a will to consume and occupy space. Studies confirm that plants communicate and activate built-in chemical defense mechanisms to ward off predators. Some even move visibly: Mimosa plants close in on themselves when touched by a human finger. This would suggest some kind of sentience, but what would the character of that sentience be? How do we quantify it? Imperceptibly and Slowly Opening highlights the inaccessible subjectivity that plants possess.

           

Scenes from the Festival of Poets Theater

Towards the end of the fall season at Sector, Patrick Durgin (Kenning Editions) and Devin King (The Green Lantern Press) joined forces to curate a Festival of Poets Theater. What follows are some photographs from those four jam-packed and wonderful days. You can also download a PDF of the newspaper publication we produced in tandem with the festival here. In that lush, tabloid you’ll find cover art by Trauma Dog, poetic essays by Eleanor Antin, Carla Harryman, Roberto Harrison, David J. Getsy and Judith Malina writing about Scott Burton’s Behavior Tableaux, + centerfold art by Mark Booth, all tied up in a bow of color and typography by dream team design duo, Sonnenzimmer.

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Devin King introducing the first night of Festival of Poets Theater at Sector 2337. Photo by Amelia Charter.

 

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“The ordinary flows itself together over forms.” Ingrid Becker and Hannah Brooks-Motl perform “Ordinary Isadora,” still from performance, Festival of Poets Theater, Sector 2337, 2015. Photo by Amelia Charter.

 

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Ingrid Becker and Hannah Brooks-Motl perform “Ordinary Isadora,” still from performance, Festival of Poets Theater, Sector 2337, 2015. Photo by Amelia Charter.

 

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“Where were you born? A shrimp cocktail? A lamb chop? Do you know Robert?” Josh Rios and Anthony Romero, “I Am American: I Speak English, ” still from performance, Festival of Poets Theater, Sector 2337, 2015. Photo by Amelia Charter.

 

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Josh Rios and Anthony Romero, “I Am American: I Speak English, ” still from performance, Festival of Poets Theater, Sector 2337, 2015. Photo by Amelia Charter.

 

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Josh Rios and Anthony Romero, “I Am American: I Speak English, ” still from performance, Festival of Poets Theater, Sector 2337, 2015. Photo by Amelia Charter.

 

Patrick Durgin, co-curator of the Festival of Poets Theater, introduces Eleanor Antin, Sector 2337, 2015. Photo by Amelia Charter.

Patrick Durgin, co-curator of the Festival of Poets Theater, introduces Eleanor Antin, Sector 2337, 2015. Photo by Amelia Charter.

 

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Eleanor Antin, “The Adventures of a Nurse” (1976), still from screening, The Festival of Poets Theater, Sector 2337, 2015. Photo by Caroline Picard.

 

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Emily Hooper Lansana (director), “The Walmart Republic,” still from a performative adaptation of of Quraysh Ali Lansana’s book of poems, Festival of Poets Theater, Sector 2337, 2015. Photo by Amelia Charter.

 

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“We laughed in the face of history.” Emily Hooper Lansana (director), “The Walmart Republic,” still from a performative adaptation of of Quraysh Ali Lansana’s book of poems, Festival of Poets Theater, Sector 2337, 2015. Photo by Amelia Charter.

 

“We laughed in the face of history.” Emily Hooper Lansana (director), “The Walmart Republic,” still from a performative adaptation of of Quraysh Ali Lansana’s book of poems, Festival of Poets Theater, Sector 2337, 2015. Photo by Amelia Charter.

 

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“This is a story about protecting the nation from foreign invasions.” Daniel Borzutzky, “El Gato Pussycat Proteja Your Gringo Cheese,” still from a neo-benshi performance, Festival of Poets Theater, Sector 2337, 2015. Photo by Amelia Charter.

 

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“There’s a man outside our bodies making comments about our perspective.” Daniel Borzutzky, “El Gato Pussycat Proteja Your Gringo Cheese,” still from a neo-benshi performance, Festival of Poets Theater, Sector 2337, 2015. Photo by Amelia Charter.

 

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Sharon Lanza (director), “Who Is React?” still from the staged reading of a Flarf piece by K. Silem Mohammad, Festival of Poets Theater, Sector 2337, 2015. Photo by Amelia Charter.

 

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Sharon Lanza (director), “Who Is React?” still from the staged reading of a Flarf piece by K. Silem Mohammad, Festival of Poets Theater, Sector 2337, 2015. Photo by Amelia Charter.

 

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Devin King and John Tipton, “Nero’s Ghosts,” performance still from Seneca (with combined translations  by Kristina Chew & John Tipton), Festival of Poets Theater, Sector 2337, 2015. Photo by Amelia Charter.

 

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Devin King and John Tipton, “Nero’s Ghosts,” performance still from Seneca (with combined translations by Kristina Chew & John Tipton), Festival of Poets Theater, Sector 2337, 2015. Photo by Amelia Charter.

 

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Devin King and John Tipton, “Nero’s Ghosts,” performance still from Seneca (with combined translations by Kristina Chew & John Tipton), Festival of Poets Theater, Sector 2337, 2015. Photo by Amelia Charter.

 

avery r. young (director) “Home On the Range,” still from the play by Amiri Baraka, Festival of Poets Theater, Sector 2337, 2015. Photo by Amelia Charter.

 

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avery r. young (director) “Home On the Range,” still from the play by Amiri Baraka, Festival of Poets Theater, Sector 2337, 2015. Photo by Amelia Charter.

 

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“I am a prostitute of the 21st century, metaphors are not enough.” TRAUMA DOG (Cassandra Troyan & Rachel Ellison) , “The Arm Collector,” performance still, Festival of Poets Theater, Sector 2337, 2015. Photo by Amelia Charter.

 

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“When you dream of appliances, who do you think made you?” TRAUMA DOG (Cassandra Troyan & Rachel Ellison) , “The Arm Collector,” performance still, Festival of Poets Theater, Sector 2337, 2015. Photo by Amelia Charter.

 

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Patrick Durgin, “Interference,” still from a remote controlled performance piece inspired by Scott Burton’s infamous “Behavior Tableaux,” Festival of Poets Theater, Sector 2337, 2015. Photo by Amelia Charter.

 

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Patrick Durgin, “Interference,” still from a remote controlled performance piece inspired by Scott Burton’s infamous “Behavior Tableaux,” Festival of Poets Theater, Sector 2337, 2015. Photo by Amelia Charter.

 

Joel Craig (director), “The Gunfight,” still from a play by Brent Cunningham, Festival of Poets Theater, Sector 2337, 2015.

 

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Joel Craig (director), “The Gunfight,” still from a play by Brent Cunningham, Festival of Poets Theater, Sector 2337, 2015. Photo by Amelia Charter.

 

Joel Craig (director), “The Gunfight,” still from a play by Brent Cunningham, Festival of Poets Theater, Sector 2337, 2015. Photo by Amelia Charter.

 

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Joel Craig (director), “The Gunfight,” still from a play by Brent Cunningham, Festival of Poets Theater, Sector 2337, 2015. Photo by Amelia Charter.

 

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Ira S. Murfin, “Figures of Speech and Figures of Thought (re-visited): Encounters from David Antin’s 80 Langdon Street talk re-performed,” still from a David Antin reenactment , Festival of Poets Theater, Sector 2337, 2015. Photo by Amelia Charter.

 

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Ira S. Murfin, “Figures of Speech and Figures of Thought (re-visited): Encounters from David Antin’s 80 Langdon Street talk re-performed,” still from a David Antin reenactment , Festival of Poets Theater, Sector 2337, 2015. Photo by Amelia Charter.

 

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Ira S. Murfin, “Figures of Speech and Figures of Thought (re-visited): Encounters from David Antin’s 80 Langdon Street talk re-performed,” still from a David Antin reenactment , Festival of Poets Theater, Sector 2337, 2015. Photo by Amelia Charter.

 

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Richard Foreman (director), “The Birth of the Poet,” still from a screening of performance documentation of a play written by Kathy Acker, with music by Peter Gordon, and sets by David Salle, Festival of Poets Theater, Sector 2337, 2015. Photo by Amelia Charter.

 

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Richard Foreman (director), “The Birth of the Poet,” still from screened documentation of a staged play by Kathy Acker, with music by Peter Gordon, and sets by David Salle, Festival of Poets Theater, Sector 2337, 2015. Photo by Amelia Charter.